Matching articles for "Colonoscopy"

Sodium Sulfate-Based Tablets (Sutab) for Colonoscopy Preparation

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 8, 2021;  (Issue 1619)
The FDA has approved an oral tablet formulation of sodium sulfate, magnesium sulfate, and potassium chloride (Sutab – Braintree) for colon cleansing prior to colonoscopy in adults. A sodium sulfate-based...
The FDA has approved an oral tablet formulation of sodium sulfate, magnesium sulfate, and potassium chloride (Sutab – Braintree) for colon cleansing prior to colonoscopy in adults. A sodium sulfate-based oral solution (Suprep) has been available in the US since 2010. Sutab is the second tablet formulation to be approved for bowel cleansing prior to colonoscopy; a sodium phosphate-based tablet (OsmoPrep) was approved earlier.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Mar 8;63(1619):33-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Correction: Plenvu

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 29, 2019;  (Issue 1577)
In our article in issue 1564 on Plenvu for colonoscopy preparation (Med Lett Drugs Ther 2019; 61:11), the comparator drug in the DAYB trial was not Prepopik, but rather Citrafleet, a similar sodium...
In our article in issue 1564 on Plenvu for colonoscopy preparation (Med Lett Drugs Ther 2019; 61:11), the comparator drug in the DAYB trial was not Prepopik, but rather Citrafleet, a similar sodium picosulfate-based preparation that is not available in the US. Also, we said that Plenvu can be taken as a single- or split-dose regimen; we should have said that it can be taken as two doses in a single day or split over two days.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Jul 29;61(1577):120 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Colorectal Cancer Screening

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2019;  (Issue 1575)
Most colorectal cancers arise from localized adenomatous polyps in a process that may take 10 years or more. Early detection and removal of a precancerous colonic lesion (polyp) can prevent cancer from...
Most colorectal cancers arise from localized adenomatous polyps in a process that may take 10 years or more. Early detection and removal of a precancerous colonic lesion (polyp) can prevent cancer from developing.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Jul 1;61(1575):97-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Plenvu - A Low-Volume PEG-Based Colonoscopy Preparation

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 28, 2019;  (Issue 1564)
The FDA has approved Plenvu (Salix), a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-containing oral powder for reconstitution, for colon cleansing prior to colonoscopy in adults. Plenvu is the first PEG-containing colonoscopy...
The FDA has approved Plenvu (Salix), a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-containing oral powder for reconstitution, for colon cleansing prior to colonoscopy in adults. Plenvu is the first PEG-containing colonoscopy preparation that requires only 1 L of water for dissolution and ingestion of 1 L of clear fluid in addition.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Jan 28;61(1564):11-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Clenpiq - A Low-Volume Sodium Picosulfate-Based Colonoscopy Preparation

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 21, 2018;  (Issue 1547)
The FDA has approved Clenpiq (Ferring), a low-volume oral solution that contains sodium picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid, for colon cleansing prior to colonoscopy in adults. The...
The FDA has approved Clenpiq (Ferring), a low-volume oral solution that contains sodium picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid, for colon cleansing prior to colonoscopy in adults. The ready-to-drink solution contains the same ingredients as Prepopik, which is supplied as a powder for reconstitution.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 May 21;60(1547):84-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

A Stool DNA Test (Cologuard) for Colorectal Cancer Screening

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 13, 2014;  (Issue 1453)
The FDA has approved Cologuard (Exact Sciences), a stool DNA test, to screen average-risk adults ≥50 years old for colorectal...
The FDA has approved Cologuard (Exact Sciences), a stool DNA test, to screen average-risk adults ≥50 years old for colorectal cancer.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Oct 13;56(1453):100-1 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Colonoscopy Preparations

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 21, 2013;  (Issue 1408)
Colonoscopy remains the preferred method of colorectal cancer screening. Many patients consider cleansing the bowel in preparation for colonoscopy the most unpleasant part of the procedure, but...
Colonoscopy remains the preferred method of colorectal cancer screening. Many patients consider cleansing the bowel in preparation for colonoscopy the most unpleasant part of the procedure, but inadequate bowel preparation significantly lowers the diagnostic yield.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2013 Jan 21;55(1408):6-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Cancer Screening

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 1, 2012;  (Issue 124)
Use of screening tests to identify cancers before they cause symptoms can lead to earlier therapy and may improve outcomes. Screening tests for some common cancers are reviewed...
Use of screening tests to identify cancers before they cause symptoms can lead to earlier therapy and may improve outcomes. Screening tests for some common cancers are reviewed below.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2012 Dec;10(124):87-94 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Propofol Revisited

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 17, 2011;  (Issue 1375)
A reader has asked us to review the use of propofol (Diprivan, and others) as a sedative agent for brief procedures, such as colonoscopy.First marketed more than 20 years ago,1 propofol has a rapid onset of...
A reader has asked us to review the use of propofol (Diprivan, and others) as a sedative agent for brief procedures, such as colonoscopy.

First marketed more than 20 years ago,1 propofol has a rapid onset of action (patients usually lose consciousness in less then one minute) and a short duration of action with a rapid recovery (3-5 minutes) that makes it highly suitable for brief ambulatory procedures. Propofol is now the most commonly used parenteral anesthetic in the US.2 The main problems with its use have been pain on injection and bacterial contamination, both related to its lipid emulsion formulation; fospropofol (Lusedra) is a water-soluble prodrug of propofol that acts similarly without pain on IV injection or a significant potential for contamination.3,4 Both propofol and fospropofol have a narrow therapeutic window; overdosing can readily induce states of deep sedation and general anesthesia, which could result in respiratory depression and loss of protective airway reflexes.

After years of use by emergency physicians and nurses, nurse anesthetists and gastroenterologists, among others, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a memo in 2010 (soon after the propofol-related death of Michael Jackson) that has generally been interpreted as limiting the use of propofol for procedural sedation to anesthesiologists. This CMS guideline for Medicare and Medicaid patients has had a ripple effect on hospital emergency departments, where propofol has been widely used for intubation, and on endoscopy suites; patients who may have had endoscopies for years without receiving bills from anesthesiologists are receiving them now.

The mortality rate associated with brief use of propofol is so low that few data are available comparing the safety of use by non-anesthesiologists with that of use by anesthesiologists.5,6

1. Propofol. Med Lett Drugs Ther 1990; 32:22.

2. PM Patel et al in LL Brunton et al, eds, Goodman and Gilman’s The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 12th ed., New York: McGraw-Hill 2011, p. 536.

3. LB Cohen et al. A randomized, double-blind, phase 3 study of fospropofol disodium for sedation during colonoscopy. J Clin Gastroenterol 2010; 44:345.

4. TJ Gan et al. Safety evaluation of fospropofol for sedation during minor surgical procedures. J Clin Anesth 2010; 22:260.

5. DK Rex et al. Endoscopist-directed administration of propofol: a worldwide safety experience. Gastroenterology 2009; 137:1229.

6. H Singh et al. Propofol for sedation during colonoscopy. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2008; 4:CD006268.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Oct 17;53(1375):84 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Correction: CT Colonography

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 12, 2009;  (Issue 1303)
(Med Lett Drugs Ther 2008; 50:94) In Table 1, "Invasive" should be "less" and "more" rather than "no" and "yes" for CT colonography and colonoscopy, respectively. In the conclusion, CT colonography should be...
(Med Lett Drugs Ther 2008; 50:94) In Table 1, "Invasive" should be "less" and "more" rather than "no" and "yes" for CT colonography and colonoscopy, respectively. In the conclusion, CT colonography should be changed to "less invasive" rather than "noninvasive".
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Jan 12;51(1303):4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Correction: CT Colonography

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 15, 2008;  (Issue 1301)
(Med Lett Drugs Ther 2008; 50:94) In table 1, "Invasive" should be "less" and "more" rather than "no" and "yes" for CT colonography and colonoscopy,...
(Med Lett Drugs Ther 2008; 50:94) In table 1, "Invasive" should be "less" and "more" rather than "no" and "yes" for CT colonography and colonoscopy, respectively.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Dec 15;50(1301):97-100 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy) Revisited

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 1, 2008;  (Issue 1300)
Options in screening for colon cancer include fecal occult blood tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, computed tomography (CT) colonography and fecal DNA tests. Since the last Medical Letter article on...
Options in screening for colon cancer include fecal occult blood tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, computed tomography (CT) colonography and fecal DNA tests. Since the last Medical Letter article on this subject, more data have become available on colonography.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Dec 1;50(1300):94-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Sodium Phosphate Colonoscopy Preps

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 22, 2006;  (Issue 1235)
Last year, a Medical Letter article reviewing colonoscopy preparations warned that oral sodium phosphate preparations, such as Fleet Phospho-Soda solution and Visicol tablets, could cause significant...
Last year, a Medical Letter article reviewing colonoscopy preparations warned that oral sodium phosphate preparations, such as Fleet Phospho-Soda solution and Visicol tablets, could cause significant electrolyte disturbances and, rarely, renal failure (Med Lett Drugs Ther 2005; 47:53). A subsequent report documented acute phosphate nephropathy and renal failure in 21 patients who had used sodium phosphate before colonoscopy (GS Markowitz et al. J Am Soc Nephrol 2005; 16:3389). Seventeen of these patients were women and 14 were taking an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB). The FDA recently issued an alert advising against use of oral sodium phosphate in patients with kidney disease or uncorrected electrolyte abnormalities and urges caution in patients taking drugs that may affect renal function such as diuretics, NSAIDs, ACE inhibitors or ARBs.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2006 May 22;48(1235):41 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Colonoscopy Preps Addendum

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 24, 2005;  (Issue 1220)
Since the publication of our article on colonoscopy preparations,1 which compared polyethylene glycol electrolyte solutions (GoLytely, and others) with sodium phosphate (Fleet Phospho-Soda, and others), some...
Since the publication of our article on colonoscopy preparations,1 which compared polyethylene glycol electrolyte solutions (GoLytely, and others) with sodium phosphate (Fleet Phospho-Soda, and others), some readers have told us that we should have included a combination of a magnesium citrate solution with bisacodyl tablets (Evac-QKwik, and others) as an alternative. In one study, such a preparation offered better cleansing and patient tolerance than a sodium phosphate regimen.2

1. Colonoscopy preparations. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2005; 47:53.

2. M Delegge and R Kaplan. Efficacy of bowel preparation with the use of a prepackaged, low fibre diet with a low sodium, magnesium citrate cathartic vs. a clear liquid diet with a standard sodium phosphate cathartic. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2005; 21:1491.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Oct 24;47(1220):88 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Screening Tests for Cancer

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2005;  (Issue 37)
Use of screening tests to identify cancers before they cause symptoms can lead to earlier therapy and may improve outcomes. Screening tests for some common cancers are...
Use of screening tests to identify cancers before they cause symptoms can lead to earlier therapy and may improve outcomes. Screening tests for some common cancers are reviewed.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2005 Sep;3(37):63-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Colonoscopy Preparations

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 4, 2005;  (Issue 1212)
Many patients consider cleansing the bowel in preparation for colonoscopy the most unpleasant part of the procedure. Several methods are...
Many patients consider cleansing the bowel in preparation for colonoscopy the most unpleasant part of the procedure. Several methods are available.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Jul 4;47(1212):53-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Virtual Colonoscopy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 14, 2005;  (Issue 1202)
Currently available techniques for colorectal cancer screening include fecal occult-blood testing, flexible sigmoidoscopy, double contrast barium enema (DCBE) and traditional optical colonoscopy. Optical...
Currently available techniques for colorectal cancer screening include fecal occult-blood testing, flexible sigmoidoscopy, double contrast barium enema (DCBE) and traditional optical colonoscopy. Optical colonoscopy requires bowel cleansing and sedation, and involves some risk, but is generally accepted as the best available method for detection of lesions and offers the advantage that polyps can be removed when they are identified. A less invasive screening tool, computed tomography (CT) colonography, also known as virtual colonoscopy (VC), offers an additional option.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Feb 14;47(1202):15-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction