Matching articles for "Kadian"

Opioids for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 12, 2022;  (Issue 1665)
A new CDC guideline for prescribing opioids for pain recently became available. Nonopioid drugs for pain were reviewed in a previous...
A new CDC guideline for prescribing opioids for pain recently became available. Nonopioid drugs for pain were reviewed in a previous issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Dec 12;64(1665):193-200 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Opioids for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 9, 2018;  (Issue 1544)
Use of nonopioid drugs for pain was reviewed in a previous issue. For many types of moderate to severe acute pain, acetaminophen and/or an NSAID may be as effective as an opioid. Immediate-release formulations...
Use of nonopioid drugs for pain was reviewed in a previous issue. For many types of moderate to severe acute pain, acetaminophen and/or an NSAID may be as effective as an opioid. Immediate-release formulations of full opioid agonists should generally be used for acute pain that is severe enough to require treatment with an opioid. Use of extended-release or long-acting opioid formulations initially and treatment durations >1 week have been associated with an increased risk of unintended long-term use.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Apr 9;60(1544):57-64 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Table: Some Oral/Topical Opioid Analgesics (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 9, 2018;  (Issue 1544)
...
View the Comparison Table: Some Oral/Topical Opioid Analgesics
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Apr 9;60(1544):e64-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Extended-Release Hydrocodone (Hysingla ER) for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 11, 2015;  (Issue 1468)
The FDA has approved a second extended-release (ER) formulation of the oral opioid agonist hydrocodone (Hysingla ER – Purdue) for management of pain severe enough to require continuous long-term therapy...
The FDA has approved a second extended-release (ER) formulation of the oral opioid agonist hydrocodone (Hysingla ER – Purdue) for management of pain severe enough to require continuous long-term therapy and for which alternative treatment options are inadequate. Hysingla ER tablets have abuse-deterrent properties to discourage their misuse.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 May 11;57(1468):71-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Extended-Release Hydrocodone (Zohydro ER) for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 9, 2014;  (Issue 1444)
The FDA has approved an extended-release oral formulation of the opioid agonist hydrocodone (Zohydro ER – Zogenix) for management of pain severe enough to require continuous, long-term therapy and for...
The FDA has approved an extended-release oral formulation of the opioid agonist hydrocodone (Zohydro ER – Zogenix) for management of pain severe enough to require continuous, long-term therapy and for which alternative treatment options are inadequate. Zohydro ER is the first single-ingredient hydrocodone product to be marketed in the US. Hydrocodone has been available for years in combination with acetaminophen (Vicodin, and others) or ibuprofen (Vicoprofen, and others).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Jun 9;56(1444):45 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2013;  (Issue 128)
Pain can be acute or chronic. The two major types of chronic pain are nociceptive pain and neuropathic pain. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less...
Pain can be acute or chronic. The two major types of chronic pain are nociceptive pain and neuropathic pain. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less responsive to opioids and is often treated with adjuvant drugs such as antidepressants and antiepileptics. Combining different types of analgesics may provide an additive analgesic effect without increasing adverse effects.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Apr;11(128):31-42 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2010;  (Issue 92)
Pain can be acute or chronic. Chronic pain has been broadly classified into two types: nociceptive and neuropathic. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less...
Pain can be acute or chronic. Chronic pain has been broadly classified into two types: nociceptive and neuropathic. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less responsive to opioids; adjuvant medicines such as antidepressants and anticonvulsants are often used to treat neuropathic pain. Combining different types of analgesics may provide an additive analgesic effect without increasing adverse effects.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2010 Apr;8(92):25-34 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

A Morphine/Naltrexone Combination (Embeda) for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 22, 2010;  (Issue 1334)
The FDA has approved an agonist/antagonist combination of morphine and naltrexone (Embeda – King) for treatment of chronic moderate to severe pain requiring around-the-clock analgesia for an extended period...
The FDA has approved an agonist/antagonist combination of morphine and naltrexone (Embeda – King) for treatment of chronic moderate to severe pain requiring around-the-clock analgesia for an extended period of time. The addition of naltrexone is intended to prevent abuse of morphine.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2010 Mar 22;52(1334):22-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2007;  (Issue 56)
Pain can be acute or chronic. Chronic pain has been broadly classified into two types: nociceptive and neuropathic. Nociceptive pain is generally treated with nonopioid analgesics and opioids. Antidepressants...
Pain can be acute or chronic. Chronic pain has been broadly classified into two types: nociceptive and neuropathic. Nociceptive pain is generally treated with nonopioid analgesics and opioids. Antidepressants and anticonvulsants have been used to treat neuropathic pain. Combining two different types of analgesics may nprovide an additive analgesic effect without increasing adverse effects.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2007 Apr;5(56):23-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Palladone Withdrawn

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 1, 2005;  (Issue 1214)
The Medical Letter review of Palladone (hydromorphone HCl) extended-release capsules (March 14, 2005) warned that a lethal dose could be released if the new formulation was taken with alcohol. Because of that...
The Medical Letter review of Palladone (hydromorphone HCl) extended-release capsules (March 14, 2005) warned that a lethal dose could be released if the new formulation was taken with alcohol. Because of that risk, the FDA asked the manufacturer (Purdue) to withdraw the drug from the market (FDA News. July 13, 2005; FDC Reports – “The Pink Sheet” July 18, 2005; 67:3).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Aug 1;47(1214):61 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Palladone for Chronic Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 14, 2005;  (Issue 1204)
A once-daily extended-release (ER) oral formulation of the opioid analgesic hydromorphone hydrochloride (Palladone - Purdue Pharma) has been approved by the FDA for treatment of opioid-tolerant patients with...
A once-daily extended-release (ER) oral formulation of the opioid analgesic hydromorphone hydrochloride (Palladone - Purdue Pharma) has been approved by the FDA for treatment of opioid-tolerant patients with persistent moderate to severe pain. Hydromorphone HCl, a semisynthetic congener of morphine and active metabolite of hydrocodone that has been used since the 1920s, is also available in immediate-release oral, injectable and suppository forms (Dilaudid, and others).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Mar 14;47(1204):21-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2004;  (Issue 23)
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; opioids; and adjuvant drugs that are not usually thought of...
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; opioids; and adjuvant drugs that are not usually thought of as analgesics, such as antidepressants, which can act as adjuvants when given with NSAIDs or opioids, or have analgesic activity of their own in some types of pain. Combining two different types of analgesics may provide an additive analgesic effect without necessarily increasing adverse effects.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2004 Jul;2(23):47-54 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 14, 1998;  (Issue 1033)
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: first, non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, some drugs not usually...
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: first, non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, some drugs not usually thought of as analgesics, which act as adjuvants when given with NSAIDs or opioids, or have analgesic activity of their own in some types of pain.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1998 Aug 14;40(1033):79-84 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction