Matching articles for "Chloroquine"

IV Artesunate for Severe Malaria

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 10, 2020;  (Issue 1604)
Artesunate for injection (Amivas LLC), a semi-synthetic artemisinin derivative, is now approved by the FDA for initial (induction) treatment of severe malaria in children and adults. It has been...
Artesunate for injection (Amivas LLC), a semi-synthetic artemisinin derivative, is now approved by the FDA for initial (induction) treatment of severe malaria in children and adults. It has been available from the CDC on a compassionate use basis since 2007. Artemether/lumefantrine (Coartem), another artemisinin-based drug, was approved earlier for oral treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. IV artesunate is now the only FDA-approved injectable antimalarial drug available in the US; IV quinidine has been discontinued.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Aug 10;62(1604):121-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Some Drugs for COVID-19

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1595)
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in...
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in treating it. Definitive answers are lacking, but some recommendations can be made. For additional information on specific drugs, see our table Some Drugs Being Considered for Treatment of COVID-19.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1595):49-50 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Table: Treatments Considered for COVID-19 (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1595)
...
View the Table: Treatments Considered for COVID-19
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1595):e1-289 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Some Drugs for COVID-19

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1919)
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in...
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in treating it. Definitive answers are lacking, but some recommendations can be made. For additional information on specific drugs, see our table Some Drugs Being Considered for Treatment of COVID-19.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1919):1 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 7, 2019;  (Issue 1582)
Patients who receive pretravel advice can reduce their risk for many travel-related conditions. Vaccines recommended for travelers are reviewed in a separate...
Patients who receive pretravel advice can reduce their risk for many travel-related conditions. Vaccines recommended for travelers are reviewed in a separate issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Oct 7;61(1582):153-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 13, 2015;  (Issue 1466)
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask for information about prevention of diarrhea, malaria, and other travel-related conditions. Vaccines recommended for travelers based on their...
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask for information about prevention of diarrhea, malaria, and other travel-related conditions. Vaccines recommended for travelers based on their destination, length of stay, and planned activities were reviewed in a previous issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Apr 13;57(1466):52-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 2012;  (Issue 118)
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask for information about appropriate vaccines and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the Centers...
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask for information about appropriate vaccines and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at www.cdc.gov/travel. Guidelines are also available from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2012 Jun;10(118):45-56 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 1, 2009;  (Issue 87)
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for information about appropriate vaccines and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. Guidelines are also available from the Infectious Diseases...
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for information about appropriate vaccines and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. Guidelines are also available from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2009 Nov;7(87):83-94 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Dronedarone (Multaq) for Atrial Fibrillation

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 5, 2009;  (Issue 1322)
Dronedarone (Multaq - Sanofi-Aventis) has been approved by the FDA for oral treatment of atrial fibrillation and flutter. Amiodarone (Cordarone, and others) is the most effective drug for this indication, but...
Dronedarone (Multaq - Sanofi-Aventis) has been approved by the FDA for oral treatment of atrial fibrillation and flutter. Amiodarone (Cordarone, and others) is the most effective drug for this indication, but has considerable toxicity.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Oct 5;51(1322):78-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs That May Cause Psychiatric Symptoms

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 15, 2008;  (Issue 1301)
Many drugs can cause psychiatric symptoms, but a causal connection is often difficult to establish. Psychiatric symptoms that emerge during drug treatment could also be due to the underlying illness, previously...
Many drugs can cause psychiatric symptoms, but a causal connection is often difficult to establish. Psychiatric symptoms that emerge during drug treatment could also be due to the underlying illness, previously unrecognized psychopathology, or psychosocial factors. The withdrawal of some drugs can cause symptoms such as anxiety, psychosis, delirium, agitation or depression.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Dec 15;50(1301):100-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 1, 2004;  (Issue 21)
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for advice about immunizations and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the Centers for...
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for advice about immunizations and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) at 877-FYI-TRIP (877-394-8747) or www.cdc.gov/travel. Recommendations for the treatment of parasitic diseases are available in the public reading room of The Medical Letter's web site.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2004 May;2(21):33-40 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs That May Cause Psychiatric Symptoms

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 8, 2002;  (Issue 1134)
Many drugs can cause psychiatric symptoms, but a causal connection is often difficult to establish. Psychiatric symptoms that emerge during drug treatment may also be due to the underlying illness, previously...
Many drugs can cause psychiatric symptoms, but a causal connection is often difficult to establish. Psychiatric symptoms that emerge during drug treatment may also be due to the underlying illness, previously unrecognized psychopathology, or psychosocial factors. The withdrawal of some drugs can cause symptoms such as anxiety, psychosis, delirium, agitation or depression.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Jul 8;44(1134):59-62 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 15, 2002;  (Issue 1128)
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for advice about immunizations and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the CDC at...
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for advice about immunizations and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the CDC at 877-FYI-TRIP (877-394-8747) or www.cdc.gov/travel.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Apr 15;44(1128):33-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Atovaquone/Proguanil (Malarone) for Malaria

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 27, 2000;  (Issue 1093)
A fixed-dose combination of atovaquone and proguanil hydrochloride has been approved by the FDA for oral prophylaxis and treatment of malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum, including choloroquine-resistant...
A fixed-dose combination of atovaquone and proguanil hydrochloride has been approved by the FDA for oral prophylaxis and treatment of malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum, including choloroquine-resistant strains.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 Nov 27;42(1093):109-11 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Prevention of Malaria

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 24, 2000;  (Issue 1070)
Patients planning to travel often ask for advice on prophylaxis against malaria. None of the antimalarials used in the past for prophylaxis has been entirely...
Patients planning to travel often ask for advice on prophylaxis against malaria. None of the antimalarials used in the past for prophylaxis has been entirely satisfactory.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 Jan 24;42(1070):8-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Generic drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 21, 1999;  (Issue 1053)
When patents expire on brand-name drugs, generic formulations become available that often cost much less. Some physicians, however, hesitate to prescribe the less expensive drug because of concerns about the...
When patents expire on brand-name drugs, generic formulations become available that often cost much less. Some physicians, however, hesitate to prescribe the less expensive drug because of concerns about the quality of generic formulations.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1999 May 21;41(1053):47-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice For Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 1, 1996;  (Issue 969)
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for advice about immunizations and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the CDC at...
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for advice about immunizations and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the CDC at 877-FYI-TRIP (877-394-8747) or www.cdc.gov/travel.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1996 Mar 1;38(969):17-20 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice For Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 13, 1994;  (Issue 922)
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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1994 May 13;36(922):41-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Health Problems in the Persian Gulf

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 22, 1991;  (Issue 838)
With the deployment of hundreds of thousands of troops in Saudi Arabia, health problems endemic to the Arabian Peninsula may be coming to the attention of physicians in the USA and other...
With the deployment of hundreds of thousands of troops in Saudi Arabia, health problems endemic to the Arabian Peninsula may be coming to the attention of physicians in the USA and other areas.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1991 Feb 22;33(838):13-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Mefloquine for Malaria

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 9, 1990;  (Issue 811)
Mefloquine hydrochloride (Lariam - Roche), a new antimalarial drug chemically related to quinine, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for prevention and treatment of Plasmodium...
Mefloquine hydrochloride (Lariam - Roche), a new antimalarial drug chemically related to quinine, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for prevention and treatment of Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1990 Feb 9;32(811):13-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction