Matching articles for "Tylenol"

Drugs for Osteoarthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 20, 2020;  (Issue 1596)
Many different drugs are used for treatment of osteoarthritis pain, but none of them prevent progression of the disease. Nonpharmacologic approaches including weight management, exercise, tai chi, physical...
Many different drugs are used for treatment of osteoarthritis pain, but none of them prevent progression of the disease. Nonpharmacologic approaches including weight management, exercise, tai chi, physical therapy, assistive devices, and total joint arthroplasty can also be used. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has published new guidelines for the management of osteoarthritis of the hip, hand, and knee.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 20;62(1596):57-62 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Some Drugs for COVID-19

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1595)
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in...
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in treating it. Definitive answers are lacking, but some recommendations can be made. For additional information on specific drugs, see our table Some Drugs Being Considered for Treatment of COVID-19.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1595):49-50 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Table: Treatments Considered for COVID-19 (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1595)
...
View the Table: Treatments Considered for COVID-19
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1595):e1-289 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Some Drugs for COVID-19

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1919)
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in...
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in treating it. Definitive answers are lacking, but some recommendations can be made. For additional information on specific drugs, see our table Some Drugs Being Considered for Treatment of COVID-19.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1919):1 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Nonopioid Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 12, 2018;  (Issue 1540)
Nonopioid drugs can be used in the treatment of many nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. Use of opioids for pain will be reviewed in a future...
Nonopioid drugs can be used in the treatment of many nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. Use of opioids for pain will be reviewed in a future issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Feb 12;60(1540):24-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Table: Some Nonopioid Analgesics for Pain (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 12, 2018;  (Issue 1540)
...
View the Comparison Table: Some Nonopioid Analgesics for Pain
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Feb 12;60(1540):e32-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Acetylcysteine (Cetylev) for Acetaminophen Overdose

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 19, 2017;  (Issue 1523)
The FDA has approved an effervescent tablet formulation of acetylcysteine (Cetylev – Arbor) to prevent or lessen hepatic injury after acetaminophen overdose. Acetylcysteine has been available for years in...
The FDA has approved an effervescent tablet formulation of acetylcysteine (Cetylev – Arbor) to prevent or lessen hepatic injury after acetaminophen overdose. Acetylcysteine has been available for years in an IV solution (Acetadote, and generics) and an oral solution for the same indication; use of the oral solution has been limited by its unpleasant odor and taste.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Jun 19;59(1523):101-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

FDA Warns Against Use of Codeine and Tramadol in Children and Breastfeeding Women

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 22, 2017;  (Issue 1521)
The FDA has issued new warnings about the use of the opioid analgesics codeine and tramadol in children, particularly those...
The FDA has issued new warnings about the use of the opioid analgesics codeine and tramadol in children, particularly those <12 years old, and in breastfeeding women due to concerns about the risk of respiratory depression and death. The FDA previously issued warnings about these drugs in 2013 and 2015.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 May 22;59(1521):86-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Osteoarthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2014;  (Issue 1450)
Many different drugs are used for treatment of osteoarthritis pain, but none of them prevent progression of the disease. Many nonpharmacologic approaches are available as well, including weight...
Many different drugs are used for treatment of osteoarthritis pain, but none of them prevent progression of the disease. Many nonpharmacologic approaches are available as well, including weight management, exercise, physical therapy, assistive devices, and total joint arthroplasty. New guidelines for the management of osteoarthritis have recently been published.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Sep 1;56(1450):80-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 7, 2014;  (Issue 1446)
The treatment of atrial fibrillation includes anticoagulation, rate control, and rhythm control. New US guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation have recently been...
The treatment of atrial fibrillation includes anticoagulation, rate control, and rhythm control. New US guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation have recently been published.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Jul 7;56(1446):53-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2013;  (Issue 128)
Pain can be acute or chronic. The two major types of chronic pain are nociceptive pain and neuropathic pain. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less...
Pain can be acute or chronic. The two major types of chronic pain are nociceptive pain and neuropathic pain. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less responsive to opioids and is often treated with adjuvant drugs such as antidepressants and antiepileptics. Combining different types of analgesics may provide an additive analgesic effect without increasing adverse effects.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Apr;11(128):31-42 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Does Acetaminophen Increase Blood Pressure?

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 18, 2011;  (Issue 1362)
A recent article in Circulation reported that acetaminophen (Tylenol, and others; paracetamol outside the US) increased blood pressure in patients with coronary artery disease. This conclusion was based on a...
A recent article in Circulation reported that acetaminophen (Tylenol, and others; paracetamol outside the US) increased blood pressure in patients with coronary artery disease. This conclusion was based on a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial in 33 patients; acetaminophen 1 g three times daily for 2 weeks was associated with statistically significant increases in blood pressure of 2.9 mmHg systolic and 2.2 mmHg diastolic.1

NSAIDs can increase blood pressure; the mechanism is thought to be inhibition of cyclooxygenase leading to decreased renal prostaglandin activity. Acetaminophen also inhibits cyclooxygenase (primarily COX-2) and decreases prostaglandin activity.2

The small increases in blood pressure reported with acetaminophen would probably be inconsequential in low-risk patients, but might be a concern for those with cardiovascular disease. Like most drugs, acetaminophen should be used in the lowest effective doses for the shortest possible time. Mild to moderate pain due to osteoarthritis or headache generally responds to a dose of 650 mg.3

1. I Sudano et al. Acetaminophen increases blood pressure in patients with coronary artery disease. Circulation 2010; 122:1789.

2. B Hinz et al. Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor in man. FASEB J 2008; 22:383.

3. Drugs for pain. Treat Guidel Med Lett 2010; 8:25.

Download U.S. English
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Apr 18;53(1362):29 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2010;  (Issue 92)
Pain can be acute or chronic. Chronic pain has been broadly classified into two types: nociceptive and neuropathic. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less...
Pain can be acute or chronic. Chronic pain has been broadly classified into two types: nociceptive and neuropathic. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less responsive to opioids; adjuvant medicines such as antidepressants and anticonvulsants are often used to treat neuropathic pain. Combining different types of analgesics may provide an additive analgesic effect without increasing adverse effects.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2010 Apr;8(92):25-34 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Acetaminophen Safety - Deja Vu

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 13, 2009;  (Issue 1316)
Concerns have surfaced again at the FDA and in the media about the safety of acetaminophen and the multiplicity of products on the market in the US that contain various amounts of...
Concerns have surfaced again at the FDA and in the media about the safety of acetaminophen and the multiplicity of products on the market in the US that contain various amounts of it.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Jul 13;51(1316):53-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

A Diclofenac Patch (Flector) for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 14, 2008;  (Issue 1277)
Diclofenac epolamine patch 1.3% (Flector Patch - Alpharma), a topical formulation of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac, has been approved by the FDA for topical treatment of acute pain...
Diclofenac epolamine patch 1.3% (Flector Patch - Alpharma), a topical formulation of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac, has been approved by the FDA for topical treatment of acute pain due to minor strains, sprains and contusions. It is the first topical NSAID patch approved in the US. A diclofenac patch has been used in Europe since 1993. Diclofenac sodium (Voltaren, and others) is available in the US as an oral tablet, in a 1% gel for treatment of osteoarthritis (to be reviewed in a future issue), in a 3% gel (Solaraze) for treatment of actinic keratoses, and in an ophthalmic formulation.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Jan 14;50(1277):1-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antifungal Drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 1, 2008;  (Issue 65)
The drugs of choice for treatment of some fungal infections are listed in the tables. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA. Other guidelines are available from...
The drugs of choice for treatment of some fungal infections are listed in the tables. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA. Other guidelines are available from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (www.idsociety.org).
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2008 Jan;6(65):1-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2007;  (Issue 56)
Pain can be acute or chronic. Chronic pain has been broadly classified into two types: nociceptive and neuropathic. Nociceptive pain is generally treated with nonopioid analgesics and opioids. Antidepressants...
Pain can be acute or chronic. Chronic pain has been broadly classified into two types: nociceptive and neuropathic. Nociceptive pain is generally treated with nonopioid analgesics and opioids. Antidepressants and anticonvulsants have been used to treat neuropathic pain. Combining two different types of analgesics may nprovide an additive analgesic effect without increasing adverse effects.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2007 Apr;5(56):23-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Pharmaceutical Drug Overdose

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2006;  (Issue 49)
Every pharmaceutical drug is a dose-dependent poison. This article describes the clinical presentation and treatment of some dangerous overdoses commonly reported in...
Every pharmaceutical drug is a dose-dependent poison. This article describes the clinical presentation and treatment of some dangerous overdoses commonly reported in adults.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2006 Sep;4(49):61-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Acetylcysteine (Acetadote) for Acetaminophen Overdosage

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 15, 2005;  (Issue 1215)
Acetaminophen (paracetamol; Tylenol, and others) taken in overdosage can cause severe hepatic injury and death. Acetaminophen poisoning is treated with (N-)acetylcysteine. Available for many years in the US as...
Acetaminophen (paracetamol; Tylenol, and others) taken in overdosage can cause severe hepatic injury and death. Acetaminophen poisoning is treated with (N-)acetylcysteine. Available for many years in the US as a solution for inhalation therapy (Mucomyst, and others), it subsequently became available for oral use and was recently marketed in the US for intravenous (IV) use as Acetadote (Cumberland).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Aug 15;47(1215):70-1 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antifungal Drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 1, 2005;  (Issue 30)
The drugs of choice for treatment of some fungal infections are listed in the table that begins on page 8. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the...
The drugs of choice for treatment of some fungal infections are listed in the table that begins on page 8. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2005 Feb;3(30):7-14 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

NSAID Alternatives

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 17, 2005;  (Issue 1200)
Patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be asking their health care providers if they should continue, and some may be asking for alternatives. For most patients taking nonspecific...
Patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be asking their health care providers if they should continue, and some may be asking for alternatives. For most patients taking nonspecific NSAIDs, it would be reasonable to continue. For those who are taking the COX-2 selective celecoxib (Celebrex) because they cannot tolerate the gastrointestinal (GI) effects of nonspecific NSAIDs, it seems reasonable to continue at doses no higher than 100 mg b.i.d. or 200 mg once daily; at these dosages cardiovascular risk has been no higher than with placebo. All NSAIDs, including COX-2 inhibitors, can decrease renal blood flow and cause fluid retention, hypertension and renal failure, especially in the elderly and in patients who take diuretics. The unpublished study that led to an FDA alert on an increased cardiovascular risk with naproxen (Naprosyn, and others) was conducted in patients older than 70. See NSAID addendum
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Jan 17;47(1200):8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Dangerous Drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 6, 2004;  (Issue 1197)
At a US Senate hearing prompted by the withdrawal of Vioxx, an FDA officer cited 5 drugs as potentially dangerous. It may be useful to revisit Medical Letter reviews of these...
At a US Senate hearing prompted by the withdrawal of Vioxx, an FDA officer cited 5 drugs as potentially dangerous. It may be useful to revisit Medical Letter reviews of these drugs.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Dec 6;46(1197):97 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

COX-2 Alternatives and GI Protection

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 8, 2004;  (Issue 1195)
With the removal of Vioxx from the market and concerns about cardiovascular toxicity with other selective COX-2 inhibitors, patients are looking for safe alternatives, and manufacturers of other drugs are...
With the removal of Vioxx from the market and concerns about cardiovascular toxicity with other selective COX-2 inhibitors, patients are looking for safe alternatives, and manufacturers of other drugs are looking for additional market share. The COX-2 inhibitors first became popular because they have less upper GI toxicity than older less selective NSAIDs, at least in the short term, in patients not taking aspirin.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Nov 8;46(1195):91-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Do NSAIDs Interfere with the Cardioprotective Effects of Aspirin?

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 2, 2004;  (Issue 1188)
Low-dose aspirin is widely used as an antiplatelet drug to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (Medical Letter 2000; 42:18). Recent reports suggest that the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)...
Low-dose aspirin is widely used as an antiplatelet drug to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (Medical Letter 2000; 42:18). Recent reports suggest that the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ibuprofen (Motrin, and others) may decrease the efficacy of aspirin for this indication. The manufacturer of Tylenol is capitalizing on these reports by advertising that aspirin-taking patients who need pain relief should use acetaminophen instead of ibuprofen.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Aug 2;46(1188):61-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2004;  (Issue 23)
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; opioids; and adjuvant drugs that are not usually thought of...
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; opioids; and adjuvant drugs that are not usually thought of as analgesics, such as antidepressants, which can act as adjuvants when given with NSAIDs or opioids, or have analgesic activity of their own in some types of pain. Combining two different types of analgesics may provide an additive analgesic effect without necessarily increasing adverse effects.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2004 Jul;2(23):47-54 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Gabapentin (Neurontin) for Chronic Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 12, 2004;  (Issue 1180)
Gabapentin (Neurontin - Pfizer), which has been available in the US since 1994, is approved by the FDA only for treatment of partial epilepsy and postherpetic neuralgia, but is widely used off-label for a...
Gabapentin (Neurontin - Pfizer), which has been available in the US since 1994, is approved by the FDA only for treatment of partial epilepsy and postherpetic neuralgia, but is widely used off-label for a number of other indications, especially neuropathic pain syndromes. According to one report, among Medicaid recipients in Florida receiving gabapentin, 71% of prescriptions were for chronic pain and 8% for seizures and neuralgia ("The Pink Sheet" February 2, 2004; 66:30).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Apr 12;46(1180):29-31 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Acetaminophen Safety

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 28, 2002;  (Issue 1142)
An FDA panel has recommended that stronger warnings about hepatotoxicity be added to the labeling for acetaminophen (www.fda.gov, search "acetaminophen...
An FDA panel has recommended that stronger warnings about hepatotoxicity be added to the labeling for acetaminophen (www.fda.gov, search "acetaminophen hepatotoxicity").
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Oct 28;44(1142):91-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Over-the-counter (OTC) Cough Remedies

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 19, 2001;  (Issue 1100)
The number of cough remedies available in the USA continues to multiply, but most products contain the same or similar ingredients in varying combinations. Most acute coughs do not require treatment with drugs,...
The number of cough remedies available in the USA continues to multiply, but most products contain the same or similar ingredients in varying combinations. Most acute coughs do not require treatment with drugs, especially in children, and suppression of a productive cough may be harmful.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2001 Mar 19;43(1100):23-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 21, 2000;  (Issue 1085)
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: first, non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, drugs not usually thought...
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: first, non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, drugs not usually thought of as analgesics, which act as adjuvants when given with NSAIDs or opioids, or have analgesic activity of their own in some types of pain. Non-opioids can be given concurrently with opioids for an additive analgesic effect.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 Aug 21;42(1085):73-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 14, 1998;  (Issue 1033)
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: first, non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, some drugs not usually...
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: first, non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, some drugs not usually thought of as analgesics, which act as adjuvants when given with NSAIDs or opioids, or have analgesic activity of their own in some types of pain.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1998 Aug 14;40(1033):79-84 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Systemic Antifungal Drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 12, 1997;  (Issue 1009)
The drugs of choice for treatment of deep fungal infections are listed in the table below. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the...
The drugs of choice for treatment of deep fungal infections are listed in the table below. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1997 Sep 12;39(1009):86-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Acetaminophen, Nsaids and Alcohol

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 21, 1996;  (Issue 977)
An advertising war between manufacturers of over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics has led some patients to ask their physicians about the safety of taking these products if they also drink...
An advertising war between manufacturers of over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics has led some patients to ask their physicians about the safety of taking these products if they also drink alcohol.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1996 Jun 21;38(977):55-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Immune Globulin IV for Prevention of RH Isoimmunization and for Treatment of ITP

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 19, 1996;  (Issue 966)
immune globulin (human) has been available for many years in an intramuscular (IM) formulation for prevention of Rh isoimmunization in pregnant Rh-negative women (Medical Letter, 16:3, 1974). Recently, the US...
immune globulin (human) has been available for many years in an intramuscular (IM) formulation for prevention of Rh isoimmunization in pregnant Rh-negative women (Medical Letter, 16:3, 1974). Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first intravenous (IV) immune globulin preparation (WinRho SD - Univax), not only for preventing Rh isoimmunization, but also for treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in Rh-positive patients.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1996 Jan 19;38(966):6-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Tramadol - A New Oral Analgesic

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 7, 1995;  (Issue 952)
Tramadol hydrochloride (Ultram - Ortho-McNeil), a centrally-acting analgesic marketed in Germany since 1977, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for oral treatment of moderate to...
Tramadol hydrochloride (Ultram - Ortho-McNeil), a centrally-acting analgesic marketed in Germany since 1977, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for oral treatment of moderate to moderately severe pain. Despite some opioid activity, tramadol has not been scheduled as a controlled substance.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1995 Jul 7;37(952):59-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Rimantadine for Prevention and Treatment of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 26, 1993;  (Issue 910)
Rimantadine hydrochloride (Flumadine - Forest), the alpha-methyl derivative of amantadine (Symmetrel, and others), was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for prevention and treatment of...
Rimantadine hydrochloride (Flumadine - Forest), the alpha-methyl derivative of amantadine (Symmetrel, and others), was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for prevention and treatment of influenza A virus infections in adults and for prevention of influenza in children.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1993 Nov 26;35(910):109-10 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 8, 1993;  (Issue 887)
Three types of analgesic drugs are available in the USA: first, aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, drugs not usually thought of as...
Three types of analgesic drugs are available in the USA: first, aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, drugs not usually thought of as analgesics, which act as adjuvants when given with NSAIDs or opioids, or have analgesic activity of their own in some types of pain. (American Pain Society, Principles of analgesic Use, 3rd ed, Skokie, illinois: American pain society, 1992).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1993 Jan 8;35(887):1-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs For Treatment Of Fungal Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 21, 1992;  (Issue 864)
The incidence of opportunistic fungal infections continues to increase, particularly in patients who have AIDS, are taking immunosuppressive drugs, or are in intensive care units. Intravenous (IV) amphotericin...
The incidence of opportunistic fungal infections continues to increase, particularly in patients who have AIDS, are taking immunosuppressive drugs, or are in intensive care units. Intravenous (IV) amphotericin B (Fungizone, and others), sometimes given with flucytosine (Ancobon), is the drug of choice for initial treatment of most rapidly progressive, acutely life-threatening fungal infections; for less severe infections, fluconazole (Diflucan, ketoconazole (Nizoral), or itraconazole (Sporanox - an investigational drug in the (USA) may also be effective, can be taken orally, and are much better tolerated. The treatment of superficial fungal infections is not discussed here.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1992 Feb 21;34(864):14-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Etodolac

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 23, 1991;  (Issue 851)
Etodolac (Lodine - Wyeth-Ayerst), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) available in Europe for several years, was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in osteoarthritis...
Etodolac (Lodine - Wyeth-Ayerst), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) available in Europe for several years, was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in osteoarthritis and as a general-purpose analgesic. It has not been approved for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1991 Aug 23;33(851):79-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Ibuprofen vs. Acetaminophen in Children

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 15, 1989;  (Issue 807)
Since the implication of aspirin in Reye's syndrome, acetaminophen (Tylenol; and others) has become the standard drug for symptomatic treatment of fever and pain in children. Ibuprofen, a nonsteroidal...
Since the implication of aspirin in Reye's syndrome, acetaminophen (Tylenol; and others) has become the standard drug for symptomatic treatment of fever and pain in children. Ibuprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) available for many years in tables (Mortin; Advil; and others), has now become available in a suspension. The suspension will be sold by presecription for treatment of fever or arthritis in children.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1989 Dec 15;31(807):109-10 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction