Matching articles for "PPIs"

Naproxen/Esomeprazole (Vimovo)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 20, 2010;  (Issue 1347)
The FDA has approved the marketing of Vimovo (AstraZeneca), a fixed-dose combination of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) naproxen and the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) esomeprazole,...
The FDA has approved the marketing of Vimovo (AstraZeneca), a fixed-dose combination of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) naproxen and the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) esomeprazole, for symptomatic relief of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis and to decrease the risk of developing gastric ulcers in patients at risk for NSAID-associated ulcers.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2010 Sep 20;52(1347):74-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Primary Prevention of Ulcers in Patients Taking Aspirin or NSAIDs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 8, 2010;  (Issue 1333)
Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are common causes of peptic ulcer disease. Patients infected with Helicobacter pylori who take aspirin or another NSAID have an especially high...
Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are common causes of peptic ulcer disease. Patients infected with Helicobacter pylori who take aspirin or another NSAID have an especially high risk. Drugs that have been tried for prevention of ulcers in patients taking NSAIDs including H2-receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), aluminum- or magnesium-containing antacids, the prostaglandin misoprostol (Cytotec, and others), and antibiotics to eradicate H. pylori.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2010 Mar 8;52(1333):17-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Generic Drugs Revisited

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 19, 2009;  (Issue 1323)
The equivalence of generic drugs to their brand-name precursors continues to be controversial. The last Medical Letter review of this subject (2002) concluded that well-documented therapeutic inequivalence...
The equivalence of generic drugs to their brand-name precursors continues to be controversial. The last Medical Letter review of this subject (2002) concluded that well-documented therapeutic inequivalence between brand-name and FDA-approved generic drugs had not been reported. Is that still true? New data have become available for some drugs.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Oct 19;51(1323):81-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Encapsulated Mesalamine Granules (Apriso) for Ulcerative Colitis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 18, 2009;  (Issue 1312)
Apriso (Salix) is a new formulation of mesalamine (5-aminosalicylic acid; 5-ASA) approved by the FDA for maintenance of remission in mild to moderate ulcerative colitis (UC). Mesalamine is a locally acting...
Apriso (Salix) is a new formulation of mesalamine (5-aminosalicylic acid; 5-ASA) approved by the FDA for maintenance of remission in mild to moderate ulcerative colitis (UC). Mesalamine is a locally acting antiinflammatory agent that is widely used both to maintain and induce remission in inflammatory bowel disease. Various mesalamine formulations have been developed to target drug delivery to areas of the small intestine and colon. Most of these agents require frequent dosing and have a high pill burden. The newest products - Lialda, introduced in 2007,1 and now Apriso - can be dosed once daily.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 May 18;51(1312):38-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Dexlansoprazole (Kapidex) for GERD and Erosive Esophagitis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 23, 2009;  (Issue 1308)
The FDA has approved the proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) dexlansoprazole (Kapidex - Takeda), a delayed release formulation of the R-enantiomer of lansoprazole (Prevacid - Takeda), for treating and maintaining...
The FDA has approved the proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) dexlansoprazole (Kapidex - Takeda), a delayed release formulation of the R-enantiomer of lansoprazole (Prevacid - Takeda), for treating and maintaining healing of erosive esophagitis and for treatment of heartburn associated with non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Mar 23;51(1308):21-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

PPI Interactions with Clopidogrel Revisted

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 23, 2009;  (Issue 1306)
Current guidelines recommend use of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) to decrease the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients taking clopidogrel (Plavix) with aspirin. A recent issue of The Medical Letter...
Current guidelines recommend use of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) to decrease the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients taking clopidogrel (Plavix) with aspirin. A recent issue of The Medical Letter considered whether omeprazole (Prilosec, and others) or other PPIs could interfere with the antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel. The conclusion was that patients taking both drugs should probably continue to do so until more data became available. Several new publications require reconsideration of that recommendation.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Feb 23;51(1306):13-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

PPI Interactions with Clopidogrel

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 12, 2009;  (Issue 1303)
Clopidogrel (Plavix), which prevents arterial thrombosis by inhibiting platelet activation, is commonly prescribed (usually with aspirin) for months after acute coronary syndromes and stent implantation. It may...
Clopidogrel (Plavix), which prevents arterial thrombosis by inhibiting platelet activation, is commonly prescribed (usually with aspirin) for months after acute coronary syndromes and stent implantation. It may also, however, increase the risk of bleeding. Therefore, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) such as omeprazole (Prilosec, and others) is often given concurrently to decrease the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Some reports have suggested that omeprazole may interfere with the antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Jan 12;51(1303):2-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Proton Pump Inhibitors for GERD in Children

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 26, 2007;  (Issue 1255)
A recent advertisement for the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole (Prevacid - TAP) suggests that children who cough at night, complain of abdominal pain, refuse to eat, or have a bad taste in their mouths...
A recent advertisement for the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole (Prevacid - TAP) suggests that children who cough at night, complain of abdominal pain, refuse to eat, or have a bad taste in their mouths may all have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A Bunny's Tummy Trouble, a children's book about GERD published by TAP, is now available as a patient handout in pediatricians' waiting rooms. The use of acid-suppressive drugs in infants and children has increased markedly in recent years and many of these drugs are now available in child-friendly formulations. A table in the article lists some of the drugs used to treat GERD in children.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2007 Feb 26;49(1255):17-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Zegerid - Immediate-Release Omeprazole

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 11, 2005;  (Issue 1206)
The FDA has approved marketing of Zegerid powder for oral suspension (Santarus), an immediate-release formulation of the proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) omeprazole (Prilosec, and others). All other oral PPIs are...
The FDA has approved marketing of Zegerid powder for oral suspension (Santarus), an immediate-release formulation of the proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) omeprazole (Prilosec, and others). All other oral PPIs are delayed-release, enteric-coated formulations designed to prevent degradation of the drug by gastric acid. Each 20- or 40-mg packet of Zegerid contains 1680 mg of sodium bicarbonate, which protects the drug from gastric acid degradation. A dose of Zegerid contains 460 mg of sodium, which may be excessive for some patients. Zegerid is the first oral PPI to be approved by the FDA for reduction of risk of upper GI bleeding in critically ill patients. The drug may be useful for patients who are unable to swallow and have nasogastric (NG) tubes in place. Zegerid costs $70.00 for 14 days' treatment, compared to less than $10 for 14 tablets of Prilosec OTC.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Apr 11;47(1206):29 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

COX-2 Alternatives and GI Protection

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 8, 2004;  (Issue 1195)
With the removal of Vioxx from the market and concerns about cardiovascular toxicity with other selective COX-2 inhibitors, patients are looking for safe alternatives, and manufacturers of other drugs are...
With the removal of Vioxx from the market and concerns about cardiovascular toxicity with other selective COX-2 inhibitors, patients are looking for safe alternatives, and manufacturers of other drugs are looking for additional market share. The COX-2 inhibitors first became popular because they have less upper GI toxicity than older less selective NSAIDs, at least in the short term, in patients not taking aspirin.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Nov 8;46(1195):91-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Pantoprazole IV (Protonix IV)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 29, 2002;  (Issue 1129)
An IV formulation of pantoprazole sodium (Protonix IV - Wyeth-Ayerst), a benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor (PPI), has been approved by the FDA for short-term treatment of Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome (ZES) and...
An IV formulation of pantoprazole sodium (Protonix IV - Wyeth-Ayerst), a benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor (PPI), has been approved by the FDA for short-term treatment of Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome (ZES) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients who cannot take oral drugs. Pantoprazole is the first PPI to be approved for IV use in the US.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Apr 29;44(1129):41-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction