Matching articles for "Menveo"

Adult Immunization

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 17, 2022;  (Issue 1661)
The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends use of certain vaccines in adults residing in the US. Routine childhood immunization has reduced the overall incidence of some of these...
The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends use of certain vaccines in adults residing in the US. Routine childhood immunization has reduced the overall incidence of some of these vaccine-preventable diseases, but many adults remain susceptible. Recommendations for vaccination against COVID-19, seasonal influenza, and monkeypox and vaccination of travelers have been reviewed separately.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Oct 17;64(1661):161-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Expanded Table: Some Vaccines for Adults (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 17, 2022;  (Issue 1661)
...
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Oct 17;64(1661):e170-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

MenQuadfi - A New Meningococcal (A, C, W, and Y) Vaccine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 17, 2021;  (Issue 1624)
The FDA has licensed MenQuadfi (Sanofi Pasteur), a quadrivalent polysaccharide conjugate vaccine that uses tetanus toxoid as a protein carrier, for prevention of invasive meningococcal disease caused by...
The FDA has licensed MenQuadfi (Sanofi Pasteur), a quadrivalent polysaccharide conjugate vaccine that uses tetanus toxoid as a protein carrier, for prevention of invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, W, and Y (MenACWY) in persons ≥2 years old.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 May 17;63(1624):78-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: New Meningococcal Serogroup B Vaccination Recommendations

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 30, 2020;  (Issue 1612)
The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has issued new recommendations for meningococcal vaccination. Booster vaccination against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB) is now recommended...
The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has issued new recommendations for meningococcal vaccination. Booster vaccination against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB) is now recommended in persons at increased risk for meningococcal disease (see Table 1). MenB booster doses were not recommended previously for any population.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Nov 30;62(1612):191-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Vaccines for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 19, 2018;  (Issue 1560)
Persons planning to travel outside the US should be up to date on routine vaccines and, depending on their destination, duration of travel, and planned activities, may also receive certain travel-specific...
Persons planning to travel outside the US should be up to date on routine vaccines and, depending on their destination, duration of travel, and planned activities, may also receive certain travel-specific vaccines. Tickborne encephalitis and dengue vaccines, which are not available in the US, are reviewed in a separate article available online. Detailed advice for travel to specific destinations is available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at www.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/list. Recommendations for administration of vaccines as part of routine adult immunization are discussed in a separate issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Nov 19;60(1560):185-92 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Tickborne Encephalitis and Dengue Vaccines (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 19, 2018;  (Issue 1560)
No vaccines against tickborne encephalitis (TBE) or dengue are available in the US, but vaccines have been licensed in some other...
No vaccines against tickborne encephalitis (TBE) or dengue are available in the US, but vaccines have been licensed in some other countries.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Nov 19;60(1560):e195 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Adult Immunization

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 7, 2018;  (Issue 1546)
The US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends routine use of the following vaccines in adults residing in the US: influenza, tetanus/diphtheria alone (Td) and in combination with...
The US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends routine use of the following vaccines in adults residing in the US: influenza, tetanus/diphtheria alone (Td) and in combination with acellular pertussis (Tdap), measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), varicella (VAR), herpes zoster (RZV; ZVL), human papillomavirus (HPV), and pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13) and polysaccharide (PPSV23) vaccines. For adults with certain medical conditions or occupational, behavioral, or other risk factors, hepatitis A (HepA), hepatitis B (HepB), meningococcal (MenACWY; MenB), and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccines are also recommended. Recommendations for vaccination against seasonal influenza and vaccination of travelers are reviewed separately.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 May 7;60(1546):73-82 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Expanded Table: Some Vaccines Recommended for Use in Adults (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 7, 2018;  (Issue 1546)
...
View the Expanded Table: Some Vaccines Recommended for Use in Adults
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 May 7;60(1546):e82-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: New Adult Immunization Recommendations

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 24, 2017;  (Issue 1519)
The 2017 adult immunization schedule approved by the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) includes some new or revised recommendations.1 The complete schedule is available on the CDC's...
The 2017 adult immunization schedule approved by the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) includes some new or revised recommendations.1 The complete schedule is available on the CDC's website (www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedule). New recommendations for use of influenza vaccine during the 2016-2017 season were included in a previous issue of The Medical Letter.2 Updated recommendations for other vaccines are summarized below. Recommendations for routine use of vaccines in adults were reviewed in an earlier issue.3

  1. DK Kim et al. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended immunization schedule for adults aged 19 years or older – United States, 2017. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2017; 66:136.
  2. Influenza vaccine for 2016-2017. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2016; 58:127.
  3. Adult immunization. Treat Guidel Med Lett 2014; 12:39.
  4. Gardasil 9 – a broader HPV vaccine. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2015; 57:47.
  5. Trumenba: a serogroup B meningococcal vaccine. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2015; 57:5.
  6. Bexsero – a second serogroup B meningococcal vaccine. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2015; 57:158.


Download complete U.S. English article

Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Apr 24;59(1519):70 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Trumenba: A Serogroup B Meningococcal Vaccine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 5, 2015;  (Issue 1459)
The FDA has approved Trumenba (Pfizer), a vaccine that protects against invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B, for use in adolescents and young adults 10-25 years...
The FDA has approved Trumenba (Pfizer), a vaccine that protects against invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B, for use in adolescents and young adults 10-25 years old.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Jan 5;57(1459):5-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Vaccines for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 24, 2014;  (Issue 1456)
Patients planning to travel to other countries should be up to date on routine immunizations and, depending on their destination, duration of travel, and planned activities, may also need to receive certain...
Patients planning to travel to other countries should be up to date on routine immunizations and, depending on their destination, duration of travel, and planned activities, may also need to receive certain travel-specific vaccines. Common travel vaccines are listed in Table 2. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at www.cdc.gov/travel. Guidelines for routine adult immunization are discussed in a separate issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Nov 24;56(1456):115-20 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Adult Immunization

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 2014;  (Issue 142)
Vaccines recommended for adults residing in the US are reviewed here. Vaccines for travel have been reviewed separately. Eight vaccines are currently recommended by the US Advisory Committee on...
Vaccines recommended for adults residing in the US are reviewed here. Vaccines for travel have been reviewed separately.

Eight vaccines are currently recommended by the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for routine use in adults at various ages...
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2014 Jun;12(142):39-48 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Meningococcal Vaccine for Infants

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 11, 2013;  (Issue 1429)
Rates of meningococcal disease are highest in infancy, but until recently no meningococcal vaccine was approved for use in this age group. MenHibrix (GSK), a new conjugate vaccine that protects against...
Rates of meningococcal disease are highest in infancy, but until recently no meningococcal vaccine was approved for use in this age group. MenHibrix (GSK), a new conjugate vaccine that protects against Neisseria meningitidis serogroups C and Y and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), has been approved by the FDA for use in infants ≥6 weeks old and Menveo, a meningococcal vaccine already approved for patients ≥2 years old that protects against serogroups A, C, Y, and W-135, is now approved for use in infants ≥2 months old.

SEROGROUPS — Five major serogroups of N. meningitidis, A, B, C, Y, and W-135, cause most of the reported cases of invasive meningococcal disease. Serogroup A is the leading cause of epidemic meningitis worldwide, especially in the meningitis belt of sub-Saharan Africa, but it is rare in the US. Serogroup B causes about 60% of all meningitis cases in infants and, together with serogroups C and Y, accounts for most of the endemic disease in the US. Serogroup W-135 has caused outbreaks worldwide, particularly among pilgrims to Mecca during the Hajj and their close contacts on arriving home. Serogroup B remains the only major serogroup for which no vaccine is available in the US. A meningococcal B vaccine (Bexsero – Novartis) is licensed in Europe and Australia for patients ≥2 months old.

IMMUNOLOGIC STUDIES — FDA approval of both MenHibrix and Menveo (for this age group) was based on immunologic studies in infants who received the vaccines at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. Both vaccines produced protective antibody responses in almost all vaccinated infants. With MenHibrix, antibody levels against Hib were non-inferior to those with 2 standard monovalent Hib vaccines.1

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR USE — The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) does not recommend routine vaccination against meningococcal disease for infants. It does recommend use of either MenHibrix or Menveo for infants who are at increased risk of meningococcal disease because of persistent complement deficiencies, functional or anatomic asplenia, or exposure to a community outbreak of disease caused by one of the serogroups in the vaccine.2 Menveo is also recommended for infants traveling with their families to the Hajj or to the meningitis belt of sub-Saharan Africa. Both vaccines can be given on a 4-dose schedule at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months, but the first dose of MenHibrix can be administered as early as 6 weeks and the last dose as late as 18 months.

1. KA Bryant et al. Immunogenicity and safety of H. influenzae type b-N meningitidis C/Y conjugate vaccine in infants. Pediatrics 2011; 127:e1375.

2. AC Cohn et al. Prevention and control of meningococcal disease: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). MMWR Recomm Rep 2013; 62(RR-2):1.

Download complete U.S. English article

Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2013 Nov 11;55(1429):92 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 2012;  (Issue 118)
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask for information about appropriate vaccines and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the Centers...
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask for information about appropriate vaccines and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at www.cdc.gov/travel. Guidelines are also available from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2012 Jun;10(118):45-56 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Adult Immunizations

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 1, 2011;  (Issue 112)
Vaccines recommended for routine use in US adults are reviewed here. Vaccines for travel have been reviewed...
Vaccines recommended for routine use in US adults are reviewed here. Vaccines for travel have been reviewed separately.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2011 Dec;9(112):75-82 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: A Booster Dose of Meningococcal Vaccine for Adolescents

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 16, 2011;  (Issue 1364)
Evidence of waning immunity by 5 years post-vaccination has led the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) to recommend, in addition to a primary dose of meningococcal conjugate vaccine at 11 or...
Evidence of waning immunity by 5 years post-vaccination has led the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) to recommend, in addition to a primary dose of meningococcal conjugate vaccine at 11 or 12 years of age, a booster dose at age 16. Adolescents who receive a first dose of the vaccine at age 13-15 should receive a booster dose at 16-18 (before college). Those who receive their first dose at ≥16 years of age do not need a booster dose. Routine vaccination of healthy persons who are not at increased risk for exposure to Neisseria meningitidis is not recommended after age 21.1

1. CDC. Updated recommendations for use of meningococcal conjugate vaccines — Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2010. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2011; 60:72.

Download U.S. English
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 May 16;53(1364):37 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

A New Conjugate Meningococcal Vaccine (Menveo)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 26, 2010;  (Issue 1343)
The FDA has approved Menveo (Novartis), a new quadrivalent conjugated polysaccharide vaccine, for protection against disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis in people 11-55 years...
The FDA has approved Menveo (Novartis), a new quadrivalent conjugated polysaccharide vaccine, for protection against disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis in people 11-55 years old.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2010 Jul 26;52(1343):59-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction