Matching articles for "Dextroamphetamine"

In Brief: Alternatives to Adderall

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 28, 2022;  (Issue 1664)
The short-acting formulation of mixed amphetamine salts (Adderall, and generics) FDA-approved for treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy, is currently in short supply...
The short-acting formulation of mixed amphetamine salts (Adderall, and generics) FDA-approved for treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy, is currently in short supply in the US. Until an adequate supply is restored, patients may be looking for alternatives.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Nov 28;64(1664):191-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for ADHD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 27, 2020;  (Issue 1590)
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic neurodevelopmental disorder that has been diagnosed in up to 10% of school-age children in the US and frequently persists into adulthood. A study...
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic neurodevelopmental disorder that has been diagnosed in up to 10% of school-age children in the US and frequently persists into adulthood. A study in a large Danish cohort found that ADHD was associated with higher mortality rates in children, adolescents, and adults, mainly due to accidents. Pharmacologic treatment of ADHD in children has been reported to decrease the risk of substance abuse in adolescents, and use of ADHD medications in adults has been associated with a reduced risk of serious traffic accidents and criminal behavior.4-6 Drugs approved by the FDA for treatment of ADHD are listed in Table 1.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Jan 27;62(1590):9-15 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

A New Amphetamine Oral Suspension (Adzenys ER) for ADHD (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 18, 2018;  (Issue 1549)
The FDA has approved an extended-release oral suspension formulation of amphetamine (Adzenys ER – Neos) for treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in patients ≥6 years old. The...
The FDA has approved an extended-release oral suspension formulation of amphetamine (Adzenys ER – Neos) for treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in patients ≥6 years old. The same extended-release amphetamine product is available as an orally disintegrating tablet and is marketed as Adzenys XR-ODT. Another extended-release oral suspension formulation of amphetamine, Dyanavel XR, was approved earlier.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Jun 18;60(1549):e106-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Two New Amphetamines for ADHD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 20, 2016;  (Issue 1497)
Two new extended-release amphetamine products have been approved by the FDA for once-daily treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in patients ≥6 years old: Adzenys XR-ODT (Neos...
Two new extended-release amphetamine products have been approved by the FDA for once-daily treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in patients ≥6 years old: Adzenys XR-ODT (Neos Therapeutics), an orally distintegrating tablet, and Dyanavel XR (Tris Pharma), an oral suspension.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Jun 20;58(1497):80-1 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Racemic Amphetamine Sulfate (Evekeo) for ADHD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 28, 2015;  (Issue 1478)
The FDA has approved racemic amphetamine sulfate (Evekeo – Arbor) for oral treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children ≥3 years old. It was also approved for treatment of...
The FDA has approved racemic amphetamine sulfate (Evekeo – Arbor) for oral treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children ≥3 years old. It was also approved for treatment of narcolepsy in patients ≥6 years old and for short-term treatment of obesity in patients ≥12 years old.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Sep 28;57(1478):137-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for ADHD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 16, 2015;  (Issue 1464)
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a disruptive behavior disorder that has been diagnosed in up to 10% of school-age children in the US, most often in boys, and frequently persists into...
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a disruptive behavior disorder that has been diagnosed in up to 10% of school-age children in the US, most often in boys, and frequently persists into adulthood. A recent study in a large Danish cohort found that ADHD was associated with increased mortality in children, adolescents, and adults, mainly due to accidents. Pharmacologic treatment of ADHD has been reported to lower the risk of serious traffic accidents and criminal behavior.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Mar 16;57(1464):37-40 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Treatment of ADHD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 1, 2011;  (Issue 105)
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a disruptive behavior disorder that occurs in about 5% of school-age children, most often in boys, and frequently persists into young...
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a disruptive behavior disorder that occurs in about 5% of school-age children, most often in boys, and frequently persists into young adulthood.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2011 May;9(105):23-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (Vyvanse) for ADHD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 16, 2007;  (Issue 1265)
Lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (Vyvanse - Shire), a prodrug in which d-amphetamine is covalently bonded to L-lysine, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in...
Lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (Vyvanse - Shire), a prodrug in which d-amphetamine is covalently bonded to L-lysine, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children 6-12 years old. It was designed to have less potential than amphetamine itself for abuse, diversion or overdose toxicity. Like methylphenidate and amphetamines, lisdexamfetamine is a Schedule II controlled substance.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2007 Jul 16;49(1265):58-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

A New Indication for Gamma Hydroxybutyrate (Xyrem) in Narcolepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 30, 2006;  (Issue 1227)
Gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a central-nervous-system depressant notorious for its use in "date rape", was approved by the FDA in 2002 as sodium oxybate (Xyrem - Jazz Pharmaceuticals) for oral treatment of...
Gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a central-nervous-system depressant notorious for its use in "date rape", was approved by the FDA in 2002 as sodium oxybate (Xyrem - Jazz Pharmaceuticals) for oral treatment of cataplexy in patients with narcolepsy. Now it has also been approved for treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) in these patients. Xyrem is a Schedule III controlled substance.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2006 Jan 30;48(1227):11-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Adderall

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 28, 2005;  (Issue 1205)
On February 9, 2005, Health Canada suspended the marketing of Adderall XR (Shire), a mixture of amphetamine salts used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (Med Lett Drugs Ther 1994;...
On February 9, 2005, Health Canada suspended the marketing of Adderall XR (Shire), a mixture of amphetamine salts used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (Med Lett Drugs Ther 1994; 36:109). The immediate-release form of Adderall was never marketed in Canada. The withdrawal was based on 20 reports internationally of sudden death in patients taking the drug. These deaths, 14 of them in children, were not linked to overdose or abuse. The FDA decided that the number of sudden deaths was no greater than expected among the large number of people taking the drug, but because 5 of the children who died had structural heart defects, added a warning against using the drug in such patients. There is no evidence that Adderall offers any advantage over methylphenidate (Ritalin, and others) or dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine, and others), but some patients who do not respond satisfactorily to these drugs may respond to Adderall. Medical Letter consultants see no need to discontinue Adderall in patients who are taking it and doing well. For patients with a heart defect or a family history of sudden unexpected cardiovascular death, methylphenidate might be a better choice.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Mar 28;47(1205):28 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Atomoxetine (Strattera) for ADHD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 3, 2003;  (Issue 1149)
Atomoxetine (Strattera - Lilly) is the first non-stimulant drug to be approved by the FDA for treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Unlike other drugs approved for use in ADHD, it is not...
Atomoxetine (Strattera - Lilly) is the first non-stimulant drug to be approved by the FDA for treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Unlike other drugs approved for use in ADHD, it is not a controlled substance and is approved for use in adults as well as children. Older non-stimulant drugs that have been used to treat ADHD, although not FDA-approved, include the alpha2-agonist clonidine (Catapres, and others) and the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine (Norpramin, and others) (Medical Letter 1996; 38:109).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Feb 3;45(1149):11-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Gamma Hydroxybutyrate (Xyrem) for Narcolepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 9, 2002;  (Issue 1145)
The FDA has approved use of gamma hydroxybutyrate (sodium oxybate is the official generic name; Xyrem - Orphan Medical) for oral treatment of cataplexy in patients with narcolepsy. Gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB),...
The FDA has approved use of gamma hydroxybutyrate (sodium oxybate is the official generic name; Xyrem - Orphan Medical) for oral treatment of cataplexy in patients with narcolepsy. Gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a metabolite of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), is a central-nervous-system depressant marketed in Europe for use in general anesthesia. In recent years it has been notorious for its use in "date-rape" (Medical Letter 2002; 44:21). Xyrem is a Schedule III controlled substance.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Dec 9;44(1145):103-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Acute Reactions to Drugs of Abuse

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 4, 2002;  (Issue 1125)
Acute toxic reactions to drugs of abuse continue to be important problems. Some patients may have mixed intoxications with complex combinations of signs and...
Acute toxic reactions to drugs of abuse continue to be important problems. Some patients may have mixed intoxications with complex combinations of signs and symptoms.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Mar 4;44(1125):21-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

A New Long-acting Methylphenidate (Concerta)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 4, 2000;  (Issue 1086)
Methylphenidate (Ritalin, and others) is now available in a new extended-release formulation (Concerta--Alza) for treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder...
Methylphenidate (Ritalin, and others) is now available in a new extended-release formulation (Concerta--Alza) for treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 Sep 4;42(1086):80-1 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 14, 1998;  (Issue 1033)
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: first, non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, some drugs not usually...
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: first, non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, some drugs not usually thought of as analgesics, which act as adjuvants when given with NSAIDs or opioids, or have analgesic activity of their own in some types of pain.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1998 Aug 14;40(1033):79-84 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Acute Reactions to Drugs of Abuse

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 10, 1996;  (Issue 974)
Acute toxic reactions to drugs of abuse continue to be important problems. Since the last Medical Letter article on this subject (volume 32, page 92, 1990), new reactions and new approaches to treating them...
Acute toxic reactions to drugs of abuse continue to be important problems. Since the last Medical Letter article on this subject (volume 32, page 92, 1990), new reactions and new approaches to treating them have been reported.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1996 May 10;38(974):43-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 8, 1993;  (Issue 887)
Three types of analgesic drugs are available in the USA: first, aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, drugs not usually thought of as...
Three types of analgesic drugs are available in the USA: first, aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, drugs not usually thought of as analgesics, which act as adjuvants when given with NSAIDs or opioids, or have analgesic activity of their own in some types of pain. (American Pain Society, Principles of analgesic Use, 3rd ed, Skokie, illinois: American pain society, 1992).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1993 Jan 8;35(887):1-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Acute Reactions to Drugs of Abuse

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 5, 1990;  (Issue 828)
...
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1990 Oct 5;32(828):92-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Methylphenidate Revisited

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 6, 1988;  (Issue 765)
Methylphenidate (Ritalin and others), a Schedule II controlled substance in the USA, is a short-acting central-nervous-system stimulant widely used for treatment of children with school performance or...
Methylphenidate (Ritalin and others), a Schedule II controlled substance in the USA, is a short-acting central-nervous-system stimulant widely used for treatment of children with school performance or behavior problems, or what is now called Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder, or AD-HD (American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, third ed., revised [DSM-III R], Washington, DC:authors, 1987, p 50). Some studies have estimated that more than 3% of elementary school students are taking methylphenidate, and one parents' group has brought a lawsuit against the American Psychiatric Association alleging that the drug is overused and has caused permanent damage to children (Wall St Journal, January 15, 1988, p 21).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1988 May 6;30(765):51-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction