Matching articles for "Stromectol"

Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 27, 2022;  (Issue 1653)
This article includes recommendations for management of most sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV and viral hepatitis. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been...
This article includes recommendations for management of most sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV and viral hepatitis. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA (see Table 1).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Jun 27;64(1653):97-104 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Table: Treatments Considered for COVID-19 (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1595)
...
View the Table: Treatments Considered for COVID-19
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1595):e1-289 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 3, 2017;  (Issue 1524)
The text and tables that follow include recommendations for management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV and viral hepatitis. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have...
The text and tables that follow include recommendations for management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV and viral hepatitis. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Jul 3;59(1524):105-12 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Head Lice

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 21, 2016;  (Issue 1508)
Head lice infestation occurs in all age groups, but especially in elementary school children. In most cases, transmission occurs by head-to-head...
Head lice infestation occurs in all age groups, but especially in elementary school children. In most cases, transmission occurs by head-to-head contact.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Nov 21;58(1508):150-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Rosacea

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 1, 2016;  (Issue 1487)
This common, chronic inflammatory facial eruption of unknown cause is more prevalent in women than in men. Rosacea is characterized by erythema and telangiectasia, and sometimes by recurrent, progressive...
This common, chronic inflammatory facial eruption of unknown cause is more prevalent in women than in men. Rosacea is characterized by erythema and telangiectasia, and sometimes by recurrent, progressive crops of acneiform papules and pustules, usually on the central part of the face. Some patients develop granulomas and tissue hypertrophy, which may lead to rhinophyma (a bulbous nose), particularly in men. Blepharitis and conjunctivitis are common. Keratitis and corneal scarring occur rarely.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Feb 1;58(1487):16-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2013;  (Issue 133)
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow include recommendations for management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis,...
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow include recommendations for management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis, and enteric infections. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Sep;11(133):87-94 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Ivermectin (Sklice) Topical Lotion for Head Lice

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 6, 2012;  (Issue 1396)
The FDA has approved the antiparasitic drug ivermectin in a 0.5% lotion (Sklice – Sanofi Pasteur) as a single-use topical treatment for head lice in patients ≥6 months old. Oral ivermectin (Stromectol...
The FDA has approved the antiparasitic drug ivermectin in a 0.5% lotion (Sklice – Sanofi Pasteur) as a single-use topical treatment for head lice in patients ≥6 months old. Oral ivermectin (Stromectol – Merck) is effective for treatment of head lice resistant to other therapies, but it has not been approved by the FDA for this indication.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2012 Aug 6;54(1396):61-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Spinosad (Natroba) Topical Suspension for Head Lice

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 27, 2011;  (Issue 1367)
The FDA has approved spinosad 0.9% suspension (Natroba – ParaPro) for topical treatment of head lice infestation in patients ≥4 years old. It is available only by...
The FDA has approved spinosad 0.9% suspension (Natroba – ParaPro) for topical treatment of head lice infestation in patients ≥4 years old. It is available only by prescription.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Jun 27;53(1367):50-1 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2010;  (Issue 95)
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow are limited to management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis and enteric...
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow are limited to management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis and enteric infections. The drugs of choice, their dosages and alternatives are listed in a table that begins on page 54. A table listing the adverse effects of some of these antimicrobials begins on page 58.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2010 Jul;8(95):53-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Benzyl Alcohol Lotion for Head Lice

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 27, 2009;  (Issue 1317)
The FDA has approved benzyl alcohol lotion, 5% (Ulesfia Lotion - Sciele) for treatment of head lice in patients ≥6 months old. The active ingredient is 5% benzyl alcohol; the vehicle is 5% mineral...
The FDA has approved benzyl alcohol lotion, 5% (Ulesfia Lotion - Sciele) for treatment of head lice in patients ≥6 months old. The active ingredient is 5% benzyl alcohol; the vehicle is 5% mineral oil.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Jul 27;51(1317):57-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2007;  (Issue 61)
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow are limited to management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis and enteric...
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow are limited to management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis and enteric infections. Guidelines are available from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with detailed recommendations for treatment of these diseases.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2007 Sep;5(61):81-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Head Lice

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 15, 2005;  (Issue 1215)
Head lice occur in all age groups, but especially in elementary school children during the winter months. Infestations are becoming more difficult to treat because of increasing resistance to the chemical...
Head lice occur in all age groups, but especially in elementary school children during the winter months. Infestations are becoming more difficult to treat because of increasing resistance to the chemical pediculicides commonly used, particularly those that are available over-the-counter (OTC).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Aug 15;47(1215):68-70 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 1, 2004;  (Issue 26)
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow are limited to management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis and enteric...
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow are limited to management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis and enteric infections. Guidelines are available from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with detailed recommendations for treatment of these diseases (MMWR Recomm Rep 2002; 51, RR-6:1). New guidelines are expected soon.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2004 Oct;2(26):67-74 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Parasitic Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 16, 2004;  (Issue 1189)
(Superseded by the 2007 version. Click here to purchase.)Parasitic infections are found throughout the world. With increasing travel, immigration, use of immunosuppressive drugs and the spread of AIDS,...
(Superseded by the 2007 version. Click here to purchase.)
Parasitic infections are found throughout the world. With increasing travel, immigration, use of immunosuppressive drugs and the spread of AIDS, physicians anywhere may see infections caused by previously unfamiliar parasites. The table below lists first-choice and alternative drugs for most parasitic infections. The brand names and manufacturers of the drugs are listed in this article
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Aug 16;46(1189):66 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drug Interactions

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 8, 2003;  (Issue 1158)
Changes caused by one drug in the absorption, distribution, metabolism or excretion of another may lead to a pharmacokinetic adverse drug interaction (DN Juurlink et al, JAMA 2003; 289:1652). Additive drug...
Changes caused by one drug in the absorption, distribution, metabolism or excretion of another may lead to a pharmacokinetic adverse drug interaction (DN Juurlink et al, JAMA 2003; 289:1652). Additive drug interactions, such as vasodilation caused by both sildenafil (Viagra) and nitrates, can also have adverse effects.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Jun 8;45(1158):46-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Parasitic Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2002;  (Issue 1127)
Superseded--purchase updated Parasitic Infections articleParasitic infections are found throughout the world. With increasing travel, immigration, use of immunosuppressive drugs and the spread of AIDS,...
Superseded--purchase updated Parasitic Infections article
Parasitic infections are found throughout the world. With increasing travel, immigration, use of immunosuppressive drugs and the spread of AIDS, physicians anywhere may see infections caused by previously unfamiliar parasites.

Note: Drugs for Parasitic Infections, revised and updated, is now available to both subscribers and nonsubscribers on our web site. This article, a bi-annual feature of The Medical Letter for many years, will not be published as a printed issue in 2002, but is included in the 16th edition of The Medical Letter Handbook of Antimicrobial Therapy. The handbook is now available and can be ordered by calling customer service at 1-800-211-2769.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Apr 1;44(1127):32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 24, 1999;  (Issue 1062)
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables [in this article] are limited to treatment of non-HIV infections associated primarily with sexual...
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables [in this article] are limited to treatment of non-HIV infections associated primarily with sexual transmission.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1999 Sep 24;41(1062):85-90 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Malathion for the Treatment of Head Lice

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 13, 1999;  (Issue 1059)
...
0.5% malathion in 78% isopropanol was recently approved by the FDA for treatment of head lice.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1999 Aug 13;41(1059):73-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction