Matching articles for "GERD"

Addendum: Dexlansoprazole for GERD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 16, 2022;  (Issue 1650)
A reader commented that our recent article on Drugs for GERD and Peptic Ulcer Disease did not include enough information on dexlansoprazole (Dexilant, and generics), a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) claimed to...
A reader commented that our recent article on Drugs for GERD and Peptic Ulcer Disease did not include enough information on dexlansoprazole (Dexilant, and generics), a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) claimed to provide "all-day and all-night relief from heartburn". Dexlansoprazole recently became available generically, but it is much more expensive than other generic PPIs.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 May 16;64(1650):79-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for GERD and Peptic Ulcer Disease

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 4, 2022;  (Issue 1647)
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common GI condition encountered in the outpatient setting; it affects about 20% of people in the...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common GI condition encountered in the outpatient setting; it affects about 20% of people in the US.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Apr 4;64(1647):49-56 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Table: H2-Receptor Antagonists and PPIs (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 4, 2022;  (Issue 1647)
...
View the Comparison Table: H2-Receptor Antagonists and PPIs
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Apr 4;64(1647):e56-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for GERD and Peptic Ulcer Disease

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 15, 2018;  (Issue 1538)
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most frequent GI condition encountered in the outpatient setting; it affects about 20% of the US population. Heartburn and regurgitation are the classic...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most frequent GI condition encountered in the outpatient setting; it affects about 20% of the US population. Heartburn and regurgitation are the classic symptoms of GERD.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Jan 15;60(1538):9-16 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Table: Drugs for GERD and Peptic Ulcer Disease (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 15, 2018;  (Issue 1538)
...
View the Comparison Table: Drugs for GERD and Peptic Ulcer Disease
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Jan 15;60(1538):e16-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Safety of Long-Term PPI Use

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 14, 2017;  (Issue 1527)
Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which are used for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and for prevention of upper gastrointestinal adverse effects caused by NSAIDs and aspirin, are one...
Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which are used for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and for prevention of upper gastrointestinal adverse effects caused by NSAIDs and aspirin, are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of drugs in the US. All PPIs are similarly effective and generally well tolerated, but their long-term use has been associated with a number of safety concerns. Recommendations addressing these concerns have recently been published.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Aug 14;59(1527):131-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Which PPI?

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 22, 2015;  (Issue 1471)
An article published in the New York Times on May 1, 2015 listed the 10 drugs on which Medicare Part D spent the most in 2013. The most costly ($2.53 billion) was the proton pump inhibitor (PPI)...
An article published in the New York Times on May 1, 2015 listed the 10 drugs on which Medicare Part D spent the most in 2013. The most costly ($2.53 billion) was the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) Nexium (esomeprazole magnesium), which has recently become available generically.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Jun 22;57(1471):91 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Esomeprazole Strontium

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 21, 2014;  (Issue 1447)
The FDA has approved the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) esomeprazole strontium for use in adults for the same indications as esomeprazole magnesium (Nexium): treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD),...
The FDA has approved the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) esomeprazole strontium for use in adults for the same indications as esomeprazole magnesium (Nexium): treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), prevention of NSAID-induced gastric ulcers, eradication of Helicobacter pylori, and treatment of pathological hypersecretory conditions. It was first marketed in December 2013 as a branded drug (Esomeprazole Strontium) and a month later as a generic drug.

Strontium is incorporated into bone. It is not recommended for use in children or during pregnancy because of the absence of safety data in those populations. Use of esomeprazole strontium is not recommended for patients with severe renal impairment.

Esomeprazole strontium is the seventh PPI to become available as a single agent in the US. No new clinical trials were required for its approval, which was based on earlier clinical trials with esomeprazole magnesium. All of the PPIs appear to be equally effective.1

  1. Drugs for peptic ulcer disease and GERD. Treat Guidel Med Lett 2014; 12:25.


Download complete U.S. English article

Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Jul 21;56(1447):64 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Asthma and COPD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 1, 2013;  (Issue 132)
INHALATION DEVICES — Metered-dose inhalers (MDIs) require coordination of inhalation with hand-actuation of the device. Valved holding chambers (VHCs) or spacers help some patients, especially young...
INHALATION DEVICES — Metered-dose inhalers (MDIs) require coordination of inhalation with hand-actuation of the device. Valved holding chambers (VHCs) or spacers help some patients, especially young children and the elderly, use MDIs effectively. VHCs have one-way valves that prevent the patient from exhaling into the device, minimizing the need for coordinated actuation and inhalation. Spacers are tubes or chambers placed between the canister and a face mask or mouthpiece, which also avoids the need to coordinate actuation and inhalation. Both VHCs and spacers retain the larger particles emitted from the MDI, decreasing their deposition in the oropharynx and leading to a higher proportion of small respirable particles being inhaled.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Aug;11(132):75-86 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

PPIs and Fracture Risk

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 18, 2013;  (Issue 1410)
Use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been associated with an increase in the risk of fractures. The FDA now requires that the labels of all prescription...
Use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been associated with an increase in the risk of fractures. The FDA now requires that the labels of all prescription PPIs include a warning about an increased risk of fractures with long-term use.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2013 Feb 18;55(1410):15-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Asthma

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 1, 2012;  (Issue 114)
Inhalation is the preferred route of delivery for most asthma drugs. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which have ozone-depleting properties, are being phased out as propellants in metered-dose inhalers....
Inhalation is the preferred route of delivery for most asthma drugs. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which have ozone-depleting properties, are being phased out as propellants in metered-dose inhalers. Non-chlorinated hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) propellants, which do not deplete the ozone layer, are being used instead.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2012 Feb;10(114):11-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Peptic Ulcer Disease and GERD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2011;  (Issue 109)
Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is usually caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or by infection with Helicobacter pylori. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be caused by...
Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is usually caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or by infection with Helicobacter pylori. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be caused by transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation, reduced lower esophageal sphincter tone, hiatal hernia, delayed gastric emptying or hormonal changes due to pregnancy. Acid suppressive therapy is the cornerstone of management for both PUD and GERD.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2011 Sep;9(109):55-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Dexlansoprazole (Kapidex) for GERD and Erosive Esophagitis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 23, 2009;  (Issue 1308)
The FDA has approved the proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) dexlansoprazole (Kapidex - Takeda), a delayed release formulation of the R-enantiomer of lansoprazole (Prevacid - Takeda), for treating and maintaining...
The FDA has approved the proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) dexlansoprazole (Kapidex - Takeda), a delayed release formulation of the R-enantiomer of lansoprazole (Prevacid - Takeda), for treating and maintaining healing of erosive esophagitis and for treatment of heartburn associated with non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Mar 23;51(1308):21-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Asthma

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 1, 2008;  (Issue 76)
No truly new drugs have been approved for treatment of asthma since omalizumab (Xolair) in 2003, but some randomized controlled trials of older drugs have been published, and new guidelines have become...
No truly new drugs have been approved for treatment of asthma since omalizumab (Xolair) in 2003, but some randomized controlled trials of older drugs have been published, and new guidelines have become available.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2008 Dec;6(76):83-90 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Treatment of Peptic Ulcers and GERD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 1, 2008;  (Issue 72)
Peptic ulcers caused by treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are mainly gastric ulcers. Most duodenal and other gastric ulcers are caused by the gram-negative bacillus Helicobacter...
Peptic ulcers caused by treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are mainly gastric ulcers. Most duodenal and other gastric ulcers are caused by the gram-negative bacillus Helicobacter pylori. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is caused by gastric acid reflux into the esophagus. Drugs that suppress gastric acid production are the primary treatment for GERD and peptic ulcers.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2008 Aug;6(72):55-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Proton Pump Inhibitors for GERD in Children

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 26, 2007;  (Issue 1255)
A recent advertisement for the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole (Prevacid - TAP) suggests that children who cough at night, complain of abdominal pain, refuse to eat, or have a bad taste in their mouths...
A recent advertisement for the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole (Prevacid - TAP) suggests that children who cough at night, complain of abdominal pain, refuse to eat, or have a bad taste in their mouths may all have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A Bunny's Tummy Trouble, a children's book about GERD published by TAP, is now available as a patient handout in pediatricians' waiting rooms. The use of acid-suppressive drugs in infants and children has increased markedly in recent years and many of these drugs are now available in child-friendly formulations. A table in the article lists some of the drugs used to treat GERD in children.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2007 Feb 26;49(1255):17-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

The Stretta Procedure for GERD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 4, 2006;  (Issue 1249)
Standard approaches to therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) include lifestyle changes, over-the-counter and prescription drugs, and sometimes surgery. Emerging endoscopic anti-reflux procedures...
Standard approaches to therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) include lifestyle changes, over-the-counter and prescription drugs, and sometimes surgery. Emerging endoscopic anti-reflux procedures that are less invasive than surgery are potential additions to current treatment options. An endoscopicallyguided radiofrequency (RF) energy delivery system, Stretta (Curon Medical), was approved by the FDA for treatment of GERD in 2000.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2006 Dec 4;48(1249):99-100 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Minimal Surgery for Treatment of GERD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2003;  (Issue 1164)
Laparoscopic surgery has become increasingly popular for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The usual surgical procedure, a Nissen fundoplication, prevents reflux into the esophagus. The...
Laparoscopic surgery has become increasingly popular for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The usual surgical procedure, a Nissen fundoplication, prevents reflux into the esophagus. The review compares medical treatment with a proton pump inhibitor vs. surgical therapy as well as open vs. the new laparoscopic technique. Morbidity and mortality with the procedures are discussed.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Sep 1;45(1164):69-70 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Over-the-counter Omeprazole (Prilosec OTC)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 4, 2003;  (Issue 1162)
The FDA recently approved the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole magnesium (Prilosec OTC) for over-the-counter use for treatment of frequent heartburn. It will be marketed in late September or early October. Five...
The FDA recently approved the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole magnesium (Prilosec OTC) for over-the-counter use for treatment of frequent heartburn. It will be marketed in late September or early October. Five proton pump inhibitors, including omeprazole, are available by prescription in the US (Medical Letter 2001; 43:36).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Aug 4;45(1162):61-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Pantoprazole IV (Protonix IV)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 29, 2002;  (Issue 1129)
An IV formulation of pantoprazole sodium (Protonix IV - Wyeth-Ayerst), a benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor (PPI), has been approved by the FDA for short-term treatment of Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome (ZES) and...
An IV formulation of pantoprazole sodium (Protonix IV - Wyeth-Ayerst), a benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor (PPI), has been approved by the FDA for short-term treatment of Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome (ZES) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients who cannot take oral drugs. Pantoprazole is the first PPI to be approved for IV use in the US.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Apr 29;44(1129):41-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Esomeprazole (Nexium)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 30, 2001;  (Issue 1103)
Esomeprazole magnesium (Nexium - AstraZeneca), the S-isomer of omeprazole (Prilosec), is the fifth benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor to become available in the United States. Omeprazole, which was the first,...
Esomeprazole magnesium (Nexium - AstraZeneca), the S-isomer of omeprazole (Prilosec), is the fifth benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor to become available in the United States. Omeprazole, which was the first, is going off patent this year.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2001 Apr 30;43(1103):36-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Pantroprazole (Protonix)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 24, 2000;  (Issue 1083)
Pantoprazole, the fourth benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor to become available in the United States, has been marketed for short-term oral treatment of erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease...
Pantoprazole, the fourth benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor to become available in the United States, has been marketed for short-term oral treatment of erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 Jul 24;42(1083):65-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Rabeprazole

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 19, 1999;  (Issue 1066)
Rabeprazole, a benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor similar to omeprazole and lansoprazole, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of duodenal ulcers, healing and maintenance treatment of erosive or...
Rabeprazole, a benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor similar to omeprazole and lansoprazole, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of duodenal ulcers, healing and maintenance treatment of erosive or ulcerative gastroesophageal reflux disease, and for long-term treatment of chronic hypersecretory conditions, including Zollinger-Ellison syndrome
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1999 Nov 19;41(1066):110-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction