Matching articles for "Kineret"

Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 15, 2021;  (Issue 1637)
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is prevalent in 0.5% of adults in the US; it is about 2.5 times more common in women than in men. Guidelines for treatment of RA from the American College of Rheumatology were...
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is prevalent in 0.5% of adults in the US; it is about 2.5 times more common in women than in men. Guidelines for treatment of RA from the American College of Rheumatology were recently updated. The goal of treatment is to minimize disease activity and prevent irreversible joint damage.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Nov 15;63(1637):177-84 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Rilonacept (Arcalyst) for Recurrent Pericarditis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 6, 2021;  (Issue 1632)
Rilonacept (Arcalyst – Kiniksa), an interleukin-1 (IL-1) antagonist that has been available for years for treatment of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes, has now been approved by the FDA for...
Rilonacept (Arcalyst – Kiniksa), an interleukin-1 (IL-1) antagonist that has been available for years for treatment of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes, has now been approved by the FDA for treatment of recurrent pericarditis and prevention of further recurrences in patients ≥12 years old. It is the first drug to be approved in the US for this indication. Anakinra (Kineret), an IL-1 receptor antagonist FDA-approved for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, has been used off-label for years for treatment of recurrent pericarditis.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Sep 6;63(1632):143-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Table: Treatments Considered for COVID-19 (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1595)
...
View the Table: Treatments Considered for COVID-19
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1595):e1-289 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Gout

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 11, 2019;  (Issue 1567)
Drugs for gout reduce the pain and inflammation of acute flares and lower serum urate levels in order to prevent recurrent flares, development of tophi, and joint...
Drugs for gout reduce the pain and inflammation of acute flares and lower serum urate levels in order to prevent recurrent flares, development of tophi, and joint damage.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Mar 11;61(1567):33-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Expanded Table: Some Drugs for Gout (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 11, 2019;  (Issue 1567)
...
View the Expanded Table: Some Drugs for Gout
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Mar 11;61(1567):e40-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 30, 2018;  (Issue 1552)
Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are used for initial treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to achieve clinical remission and prevent irreversible joint damage (see Table 1). DMARDs generally...
Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are used for initial treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to achieve clinical remission and prevent irreversible joint damage (see Table 1). DMARDs generally do not have an immediate analgesic effect, but over time they can control symptoms and have been shown to delay and possibly stop progression of the disease. Methotrexate (Trexall, and others) is generally the drug of choice; it can be used for patients with low, moderate, or high disease activity. For mild disease, some clinicians prefer to start with hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil, and generics) and/or sulfasalazine (Azulfidine, and others).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Jul 30;60(1552):123-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Expanded Table: Biologic Agents for Rheumatoid Arthritis (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 30, 2018;  (Issue 1552)
...
View Expanded Table: Biologic Agents for Rheumatoid Arthritis
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Jul 30;60(1552):e130-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Sarilumab (Kevzara) for Rheumatoid Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 14, 2017;  (Issue 1527)
The FDA has approved the interleukin (IL)-6 inhibitor sarilumab (Kevzara – Sanofi) for second-line treatment of adults with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is the second...
The FDA has approved the interleukin (IL)-6 inhibitor sarilumab (Kevzara – Sanofi) for second-line treatment of adults with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is the second IL-6 inhibitor to be approved for this indication; tocilizumab (Actemra) was approved earlier.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Aug 14;59(1527):134-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 22, 2014;  (Issue 1458)
For initial treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, most expert clinicians prescribe a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) and add a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) or a corticosteroid to...
For initial treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, most expert clinicians prescribe a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) and add a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) or a corticosteroid to control symptoms. Methotrexate is generally the DMARD of choice...

DMARDs
Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are used early in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to achieve clinical remission, prevent irreversible damage to joints, and minimize toxicity associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids. DMARDs generally do not have an immediate analgesic effect, but over time can control symptoms and have been shown to delay and possibly stop progression of the disease. Methotrexate (Rheumatrex, and others) is generally the first DMARD prescribed; it can be used to treat mild, moderate, or severe RA. For mild disease, some clinicians prefer to start with hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil, and generics) and/or sulfasalazine (Azulfidine, and others).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Dec 22;56(1458):127-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Gout

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 17, 2014;  (Issue 1438)
The goals of gout treatment are threefold: treating acute inflammation, preventing flares, and lowering serum urate...
The goals of gout treatment are threefold: treating acute inflammation, preventing flares, and lowering serum urate levels.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Mar 17;56(1438):22-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Canakinumab (Ilaris) for Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 19, 2013;  (Issue 1423)
The FDA has approved the interleukin-1 (IL-1) beta inhibitor canakinumab (Ilaris – Novartis) for treatment of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA; formerly called juvenile rheumatoid arthritis or...
The FDA has approved the interleukin-1 (IL-1) beta inhibitor canakinumab (Ilaris – Novartis) for treatment of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA; formerly called juvenile rheumatoid arthritis or Still’s disease) in children ≥2 years old. Canakinumab was approved earlier for treatment of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Tocilizumab (Actemra), an interleukin-6 (IL-6) inhibitor that has been available since 2010 for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in adults, was also recently approved by the FDA for sJIA. Canakinumab is the only IL-1 inhibitor approved for this indication.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2013 Aug 19;55(1423):65-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2009;  (Issue 85)
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Drug selection is guided by disease type (Crohn's versus ulcerative colitis), severity and location and whether the goal is...
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Drug selection is guided by disease type (Crohn's versus ulcerative colitis), severity and location and whether the goal is induction or maintenance of remission. Table 1 on page 66 lists the drugs used to treat IBD with their formulations and cost. Table 2 on page 68 lists the drugs of choice and their doses for different indications. Table 3 on page 71 lists the drugs' adverse effects and recommendations for monitoring. More detailed guidelines are available from the American College of Gastroenterology.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2009 Sep;7(85):65-74 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 1, 2009;  (Issue 81)
Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are now used early in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to prevent irreversible damage to joints and minimize toxicities associated with nonsteroidal...
Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are now used early in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to prevent irreversible damage to joints and minimize toxicities associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2009 May;7(81):37-46 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Abatacept (Orencia) for Rheumatoid Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 27, 2006;  (Issue 1229)
Atacept (Orencia - Bristol-Myers Squibb), an inhibitor of T-cell activation, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients who have not responded to one...
Atacept (Orencia - Bristol-Myers Squibb), an inhibitor of T-cell activation, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients who have not responded to one or more disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2006 Feb 27;48(1229):17-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 1, 2005;  (Issue 40)
To prevent irreversible damage to joints and minimize toxicities associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids, disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are now used...
To prevent irreversible damage to joints and minimize toxicities associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids, disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are now used early in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The DMARDs listed in the table on page 84 have no immediate analgesic effects, but can control symptoms and have been shown to delay and possibly stop progression of the disease. The NSAIDs listed in the table on page 88 have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, but may not affect the disease process. Oral corticosteroids can rapidly relieve joint symptoms and control systemic manifestations, but their chronic use is associated with many complications.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2005 Dec;3(40):83-90 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 1, 2003;  (Issue 5)
Many different drugs are now used to treat rheumatoid arthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), listed in the table on page 26, have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, but may not affect...
Many different drugs are now used to treat rheumatoid arthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), listed in the table on page 26, have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, but may not affect the disease process. Corticosteroids can provide rapid relief of joint symptoms and control of systemic manifestations, but chronic use is associated with many complications. The "disease-modifying" anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), listed on page 29, have no immediate analgesic effects, but can control symptoms and may delay progression of the disease (American College of Rheumatology Subcommittee on Rheumatoid Arthritis Guidelines, Arthritis Rheum 2002; 46:328). Interactions of anti-rheumatic drugs with other drugs are listed in The Medical Letter Handbook of Adverse Drug Interactions, 2003.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2003 Jan;1(5):25-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Anakinra (Kineret) For Rheumatoid Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 18, 2002;  (Issue 1124)
Anakinra (Kineret - Amgen), an interleuken-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of moderately to severly active rheumatoid arthritis in adults who have failed at least one...
Anakinra (Kineret - Amgen), an interleuken-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of moderately to severly active rheumatoid arthritis in adults who have failed at least one disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug(DMARD) such as methotrexate (Medical Letter 2000; 24:57).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Feb 18;44(1124):18-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction