Matching articles for "dulaglutide"

Tirzepatide (Mounjaro) for Type 2 Diabetes

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 11, 2022;  (Issue 1654)
The FDA has approved tirzepatide (Mounjaro – Lilly), a peptide hormone with activity at both glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors, to improve...
The FDA has approved tirzepatide (Mounjaro – Lilly), a peptide hormone with activity at both glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors, to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. Tirzepatide, which is injected subcutaneously once weekly, is the first dual GIP/GLP-1 receptor agonist to become available in the US. Selective GIP receptor agonists are not available in the US; GLP-1 receptor agonists have been available for years.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Jul 11;64(1654):105-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Two New Doses of Dulaglutide (Trulicity) for Diabetes

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 19, 2020;  (Issue 1609)
The FDA has approved two additional doses (3 mg and 4.5 mg) of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist dulaglutide (Trulicity – Lilly) for treatment of type 2 diabetes in adults. Dulaglutide...
The FDA has approved two additional doses (3 mg and 4.5 mg) of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist dulaglutide (Trulicity – Lilly) for treatment of type 2 diabetes in adults. Dulaglutide has been available in 0.75- and 1.5-mg doses for years.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Oct 19;62(1609):168 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Type 2 Diabetes

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 4, 2019;  (Issue 1584)
Diet, exercise, and weight loss can improve glycemic control, but almost all patients with type 2 diabetes eventually require drug therapy. Treating to a glycated hemoglobin (A1C) concentration of...
Diet, exercise, and weight loss can improve glycemic control, but almost all patients with type 2 diabetes eventually require drug therapy. Treating to a glycated hemoglobin (A1C) concentration of <7% can prevent microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy), but whether it prevents macrovascular complications and death is unclear. An A1C target of <8% may be appropriate for older patients and those with underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD), a history of severe hypoglycemia, diabetes-related complications, a limited life expectancy, or a long duration of disease.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Nov 4;61(1584):169-78 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Oral Semaglutide (Rybelsus) for Type 2 Diabetes

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 21, 2019;  (Issue 1583)
An oral formulation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist semaglutide (Rybelsus – Novo Nordisk) has been approved by the FDA for once-daily treatment of type 2 diabetes in adults....
An oral formulation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist semaglutide (Rybelsus – Novo Nordisk) has been approved by the FDA for once-daily treatment of type 2 diabetes in adults. Semaglutide, which has been available in a subcutaneously-injected formulation (Ozempic) since 2017, is the first GLP-1 receptor agonist to become available for oral administration; the 4 other GLP-1 receptor agonists currently available in the US are administered by subcutaneous (SC) injection.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Oct 21;61(1583):166-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Cardiovascular Benefits of SGLT2 Inhibitors and GLP-1 Receptor Agonists in Type 2 Diabetes

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 25, 2019;  (Issue 1566)
Since 2008, because of safety concerns, the FDA has mandated that long-term cardiovascular outcomes trials be conducted for all new drugs for type 2 diabetes. Reductions in the incidence of macrovascular...
Since 2008, because of safety concerns, the FDA has mandated that long-term cardiovascular outcomes trials be conducted for all new drugs for type 2 diabetes. Reductions in the incidence of macrovascular complications in these trials with some sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease (see Table 1) have led to new recommendations.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Feb 25;61(1566):26-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Semaglutide (Ozempic) - Another Injectable GLP-1 Receptor Agonist for Type 2 Diabetes

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 29, 2018;  (Issue 1539)
The FDA has approved semaglutide (Ozempic – Novo Nordisk), a long-acting injectable GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) receptor agonist, for once-weekly treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes. It is the...
The FDA has approved semaglutide (Ozempic – Novo Nordisk), a long-acting injectable GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) receptor agonist, for once-weekly treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes. It is the sixth GLP-1 receptor agonist to be approved in the US.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Jan 29;60(1539):19-21 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Cardiovascular Effects of Some Antidiabetic Drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 14, 2017;  (Issue 1527)
For many years, the goal of drug therapy for most patients with type 2 diabetes has been to achieve and maintain an A1C of...
For many years, the goal of drug therapy for most patients with type 2 diabetes has been to achieve and maintain an A1C of <7%. Achieving that goal can prevent microvascular complications (diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy), but whether it prevents macrovascular complications (myocardial infarction [MI], stroke) has been less clear. The FDA now requires that cardiovascular safety studies be performed for all new drugs for type 2 diabetes.1 Recent findings that some of the newer second-line drugs for type 2 diabetes have cardiovascular benefits have led to new interest in the cardiovascular efficacy and safety of all antidiabetic drugs.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Aug 14;59(1527):136-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Prescription Drug Prices in the US

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 22, 2017;  (Issue 1521)
Per capita spending on prescription drugs in the US is higher than in other industrialized nations,...
Per capita spending on prescription drugs in the US is higher than in other industrialized nations, including Canada.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 May 22;59(1521):81-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Lixisenatide for Type 2 Diabetes

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 30, 2017;  (Issue 1513)
The FDA has approved lixisenatide (Sanofi), a short-acting injectable GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) receptor agonist, for once-daily treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes, both alone (Adlyxin) and in...
The FDA has approved lixisenatide (Sanofi), a short-acting injectable GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) receptor agonist, for once-daily treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes, both alone (Adlyxin) and in a fixed-ratio combination with insulin glargine (Soliqua 100/33). Lixisenatide has been available since 2013 in many other countries as Lyxumia. It is the fifth GLP-1 receptor agonist to be approved in the US.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Jan 30;59(1513):19-21 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Type 2 Diabetes

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 16, 2017;  (Issue 1512)
The goal of drug therapy for type 2 diabetes is to achieve and maintain a near-normal glycated hemoglobin (A1C) concentration without inducing hypoglycemia; the target is generally an A1C of ≤7%....
The goal of drug therapy for type 2 diabetes is to achieve and maintain a near-normal glycated hemoglobin (A1C) concentration without inducing hypoglycemia; the target is generally an A1C of ≤7%. Treating to this target has been shown to prevent microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy), but whether it prevents macrovascular outcomes is unclear. An A1C target of <8% may be appropriate for older patients and those with underlying cardiovascular disease, a history of severe hypoglycemia, diabetes-related complications or comorbidities, or a long duration of disease.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Jan 16;59(1512):9-18 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Two New GLP-1 Receptor Agonists for Diabetes

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 10, 2014;  (Issue 1455)
Two new injectable GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) receptor agonists, dulaglutide (Trulicity [trū li si tee] – Lilly) and albiglutide (Tanzeum [tan' zee um] – GSK), have been approved by the FDA for...
Two new injectable GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) receptor agonists, dulaglutide (Trulicity [trū li si tee] – Lilly) and albiglutide (Tanzeum [tan' zee um] – GSK), have been approved by the FDA for once-weekly treatment of type 2 diabetes. Other available GLP-1 receptor agonists include exenatide, which is approved for injection twice daily (Byetta) or once weekly (Bydureon), and liraglutide (Victoza), which is injected once daily.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Nov 10;56(1455):109-11 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction