Matching articles for "Abilify"

In Brief: Three New Injectable Antipsychotic Drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 25, 2023;  (Issue 1692)
Three extended-release injectable formulations of second-generation antipsychotic drugs — two of risperidone (Rykindo, Uzedy) and one of aripiprazole (Abilify Asimtufii) — have been approved by the...
Three extended-release injectable formulations of second-generation antipsychotic drugs — two of risperidone (Rykindo, Uzedy) and one of aripiprazole (Abilify Asimtufii) — have been approved by the FDA for treatment of schizophrenia in adults. Rykindo and Abilify Asimtufii are also approved for maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder in adults. Other extended-release injectable formulations of risperidone and aripiprazole have been available in the US for years (see Table 1).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2023 Dec 25;65(1692):207-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 11, 2023;  (Issue 1691)
A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) is generally used for initial treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). A serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), bupropion (Wellbutrin SR,...
A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) is generally used for initial treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). A serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), bupropion (Wellbutrin SR, and others), and mirtazapine (Remeron, and others) are reasonable alternatives. Improvement in symptoms can occur within the first two weeks of treatment with these drugs, but a substantial benefit may not be achieved for 4-8 weeks.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2023 Dec 11;65(1691):193-200 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Brexpiprazole (Rexulti) for Agitation in Alzheimer's Dementia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 26, 2023;  (Issue 1679)
The FDA has approved the oral second-generation antipsychotic drug brexpiprazole (Rexulti – Otsuka/Lundbeck) for once-daily treatment of agitation associated with dementia due to Alzheimer's disease...
The FDA has approved the oral second-generation antipsychotic drug brexpiprazole (Rexulti – Otsuka/Lundbeck) for once-daily treatment of agitation associated with dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Brexpiprazole is the first drug to be approved in the US for this indication. It is also approved for treatment of schizophrenia and as an adjunct to antidepressants for treatment of major depressive disorder.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2023 Jun 26;65(1679):99-101 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Cariprazine (Vraylar) for Adjunctive Treatment of Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 29, 2023;  (Issue 1677)
The FDA has approved the second-generation antipsychotic drug cariprazine (Vraylar — Abbvie) for adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults. Cariprazine was previously approved for...
The FDA has approved the second-generation antipsychotic drug cariprazine (Vraylar — Abbvie) for adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults. Cariprazine was previously approved for treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar depression, and for acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2023 May 29;65(1677):84-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Twice-Yearly Paliperidone (Invega Hafyera) for Schizophrenia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 10, 2022;  (Issue 1641)
Invega Hafyera (Janssen), a long-acting, extended-release (ER) formulation of the second-generation antipsychotic paliperidone palmitate, has been approved by the FDA for twice-yearly IM treatment of...
Invega Hafyera (Janssen), a long-acting, extended-release (ER) formulation of the second-generation antipsychotic paliperidone palmitate, has been approved by the FDA for twice-yearly IM treatment of schizophrenia in adults who have been adequately treated with another injectable ER formulation of the drug (Invega Sustenna or Invega Trinza). It is the first drug to become available in the US for twice-yearly treatment of schizophrenia.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Jan 10;64(1641):7-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Lumateperone (Caplyta) for Schizophrenia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 27, 2020;  (Issue 1603)
The FDA has approved lumateperone (Caplyta — Intracellular Therapies), an oral second-generation antipsychotic, for once-daily treatment of schizophrenia in adults. It is the 13th second-generation...
The FDA has approved lumateperone (Caplyta — Intracellular Therapies), an oral second-generation antipsychotic, for once-daily treatment of schizophrenia in adults. It is the 13th second-generation antipsychotic drug to be approved by the FDA for this indication.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Jul 27;62(1603):113-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 24, 2020;  (Issue 1592)
Complete remission of symptoms is the goal of treatment for major depressive disorder; a partial response is associated with an increased risk of relapse. Improvement in symptoms can occur within the first...
Complete remission of symptoms is the goal of treatment for major depressive disorder; a partial response is associated with an increased risk of relapse. Improvement in symptoms can occur within the first two weeks of treatment with an antidepressant, but it may take 4-8 weeks to achieve a substantial benefit. Following successful treatment of a first major depressive episode, antidepressant treatment should be continued at the same dose for at least 4-9 months to consolidate recovery. In patients with recurrent depressive episodes, long-term maintenance treatment can reduce the risk of relapse.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Feb 24;62(1592):25-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Prescription Drug Prices in the US

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 22, 2017;  (Issue 1521)
Per capita spending on prescription drugs in the US is higher than in other industrialized nations,...
Per capita spending on prescription drugs in the US is higher than in other industrialized nations, including Canada.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 May 22;59(1521):81-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Psychotic Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 19, 2016;  (Issue 1510)
Oral antipsychotic drugs used for treatment of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, delusional disorder, and other manifestations of psychosis or mania are listed in Table 1. Parenteral antipsychotic...
Oral antipsychotic drugs used for treatment of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, delusional disorder, and other manifestations of psychosis or mania are listed in Table 1. Parenteral antipsychotic drugs used for treatment of these disorders are listed in Table 2.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Dec 19;58(1510):160-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Bipolar Disorder

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 15, 2016;  (Issue 1501)
Bipolar disorder is characterized by intermittent episodes of mania and/or depression. Even with maintenance treatment, recurrences of manic or (more frequently) depressive episodes are common. Some of the...
Bipolar disorder is characterized by intermittent episodes of mania and/or depression. Even with maintenance treatment, recurrences of manic or (more frequently) depressive episodes are common. Some of the drugs and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA for use in bipolar disorder.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Aug 15;58(1501):103-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Cariprazine (Vraylar) for Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Disorder

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 25, 2016;  (Issue 1493)
The FDA has approved cariprazine (Vraylar – Actavis), an oral, once-daily, second-generation antipsychotic, for treatment of schizophrenia and for acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with...
The FDA has approved cariprazine (Vraylar – Actavis), an oral, once-daily, second-generation antipsychotic, for treatment of schizophrenia and for acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Apr 25;58(1493):51-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Two Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics for Schizophrenia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 9, 2015;  (Issue 1481)
The FDA has approved two new long-acting injectable formulations of second-generation antipsychotics for treatment of schizophrenia: aripiprazole lauroxil (Aristada – Alkermes), which is given once every...
The FDA has approved two new long-acting injectable formulations of second-generation antipsychotics for treatment of schizophrenia: aripiprazole lauroxil (Aristada – Alkermes), which is given once every 4-6 weeks, and paliperidone palmitate (Invega Trinza – Janssen), which is given once every 3 months. Once-monthly injectable formulations of aripiprazole (Abilify Maintena) and paliperidone palmitate (Invega Sustenna) were approved earlier.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Nov 9;57(1481):152-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Brexpiprazole (Rexulti) for Schizophrenia and Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 17, 2015;  (Issue 1475)
The FDA has approved the oral, once-daily, second-generation antipsychotic brexpiprazole (Rexulti – Otsuka/Lundbeck) for treatment of schizophrenia and as an adjunct to antidepressants for treatment of...
The FDA has approved the oral, once-daily, second-generation antipsychotic brexpiprazole (Rexulti – Otsuka/Lundbeck) for treatment of schizophrenia and as an adjunct to antidepressants for treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). Aripiprazole (Abilify), a structurally similar second-generation antipsychotic also comarketed by Otsuka (with BMS), recently became available generically.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Aug 17;57(1475):116-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Inhaled Loxapine (Adasuve) for Acute Agitation

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 14, 2014;  (Issue 1440)
The FDA has approved an inhalation powder formulation of loxapine (Adasuve – Teva), a first-generation antipsychotic long available in an oral formulation, for treatment of acute agitation related to...
The FDA has approved an inhalation powder formulation of loxapine (Adasuve – Teva), a first-generation antipsychotic long available in an oral formulation, for treatment of acute agitation related to schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder in adults. Adasuve is the first inhaled drug to be approved for this indication.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Apr 14;56(1440):31-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Cognitive Loss and Dementia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 1, 2013;  (Issue 134)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia, but cognitive loss is also associated with other neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and...
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia, but cognitive loss is also associated with other neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and vascular dementia. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is generally defined as cognitive decline greater than expected for an individual's age and educational level, but not interfering with activities of daily living; it may be a transitional state between the cognitive changes of normal aging and dementia.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Oct;11(134):95-100 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Psychiatric Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 2013;  (Issue 130)
Drugs are not the only treatment for psychiatric illness. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be used for many...
Drugs are not the only treatment for psychiatric illness. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be used for many of them as well. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has a long history of efficacy and safety when drugs are ineffective or cannot be used.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Jun;11(130):53-64 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Long-Acting Injectable Aripiprazole (Abilify Maintena) for Schizophrenia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 29, 2013;  (Issue 1415)
An extended-release injectable formulation of the second-generation antipsychotic aripiprazole (Abilify) has been approved by the FDA (Abilify Maintena – Otsuka/Lundbeck) for once-monthly treatment of...
An extended-release injectable formulation of the second-generation antipsychotic aripiprazole (Abilify) has been approved by the FDA (Abilify Maintena – Otsuka/Lundbeck) for once-monthly treatment of schizophrenia. It is the fourth second-generation antipsychotic to become available in a long-acting parenteral formulation. Long-acting parenteral antipsychotics, given at intervals of 2-4 weeks, are generally used for patients with a history of relapse due to poor adherence to oral maintenance therapy.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2013 Apr 29;55(1415):34-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Adjunctive Antipsychotics for Major Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 19, 2011;  (Issue 1373)
Augmentation with a second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic is a treatment option for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) whose symptoms persist following antidepressant monotherapy. Aripiprazole...
Augmentation with a second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic is a treatment option for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) whose symptoms persist following antidepressant monotherapy. Aripiprazole (Abilify), olanzapine in a fixed-dose combination with fluoxetine (Symbyax), and extended-release quetiapine (Seroquel XR) have been approved by the FDA for such use.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Sep 19;53(1373):74-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Lurasidone (Latuda) for Schizophrenia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 21, 2011;  (Issue 1358)
The FDA has approved lurasidone (Latuda - Sunovion), a new second-generation antipsychotic, for oral treatment of schizophrenia in...
The FDA has approved lurasidone (Latuda - Sunovion), a new second-generation antipsychotic, for oral treatment of schizophrenia in adults.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Feb 21;53(1358):13-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Psychotic Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 1, 2010;  (Issue 96)
The antipsychotic drugs listed in Table 1 on the next page are more effective for treating the “positive symptoms” of schizophrenia (hallucinations and delusions) than the “negative symptoms” (apathy,...
The antipsychotic drugs listed in Table 1 on the next page are more effective for treating the “positive symptoms” of schizophrenia (hallucinations and delusions) than the “negative symptoms” (apathy, social withdrawal, and blunted affect). Some symptoms of schizophrenia and acute psychoses may improve rapidly after treatment with antipsychotic drugs, but chronic schizophrenia improves slowly over many weeks and some patients may continue to improve for months. Most patients with chronic schizophrenia require prolonged maintenance therapy, but the risk of tardive dyskinesia and adverse metabolic effects must be kept in mind.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2010 Aug;8(96):61-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Depression and Bipolar Disorder

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 1, 2010;  (Issue 93)
Drugs are not the only treatment for mood disorders. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has a long history of efficacy and...
Drugs are not the only treatment for mood disorders. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has a long history of efficacy and safety when drugs are ineffective, poorly tolerated or cannot be used. Some drugs are recommended here for indications that have not been approved by the FDA.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2010 May;8(93):35-42 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Cardiac Risks of Antipsychotic Drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 23, 2009;  (Issue 1306)
A recently published retrospective cohort study in patients 30-74 years old has led to headlines in the media warning that use of atypical antipsychotic drugs doubles patients’ risk of sudden cardiac death....
A recently published retrospective cohort study in patients 30-74 years old has led to headlines in the media warning that use of atypical antipsychotic drugs doubles patients’ risk of sudden cardiac death. Typical antipsychotics have long been associated with this risk. In this study, however, the incidence of sudden cardiac death was similar with typical and atypical antipsychotics: about 1 in 340 person-years among the patients who took typical (first generation) antipsychotics such as haloperidol (Haldol, and others) and 1 in 360 personyears among those who took atypical (second-generation) drugs such as olanzapine (Zyprexa), compared to 1 in 700 patient-years among otherwise similar nonusers of antipsychotic drugs. The risk increased with the dose of the drug and also with the age of the patient; the authors state that they did not include patients younger than 30 because sudden cardiac death is very rare in the younger age group.1

Second-generation drugs are less likely than first generation drugs to cause extrapyramidal symptoms, tardive dyskinesia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome, but more likely to cause weight gain and other metabolic abnormalities.2 Aripiprazole (Abilify)3 is least likely to prolong the QT interval, which is one of the mechanisms that could be responsible for the small increase in the absolute risk of sudden death among patients who take antipsychotic drugs.

In a patient with a good indication for its use, the consequences of not taking an antipsychotic drug may be greater than the risks of taking one.

1. WA Ray et al. Atypical antipsychotic drugs and the risk of sudden cardiac death. N Engl J Med 2009; 360:225.
2. Drugs for psychiatric disorders. Treat Guidel Med Lett 2006; 4:35.
3. Second-generation antipsychotics — aripiprazole revisited. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2005; 47:81.

Download: U.S. English
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Feb 23;51(1306):13 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Psychiatric Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 2006;  (Issue 46)
Drugs are not the only treatment for psychiatric illness. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is used for many of them as...
Drugs are not the only treatment for psychiatric illness. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is used for many of them as well. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has a long history of efficacy and safety when drugs are ineffective or cannot be used.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2006 Jun;4(46):35-46 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Second-Generation Antipsychotics - Aripiprazole Revisited

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 10, 2005;  (Issue 1219)
Aripiprazole (Abilify - Bristol-Myers Squibb/Otsuka), a second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic drug, was approved by the FDA in 2002 for treatment of schizophrenia and more recently for bipolar disorder as...
Aripiprazole (Abilify - Bristol-Myers Squibb/Otsuka), a second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic drug, was approved by the FDA in 2002 for treatment of schizophrenia and more recently for bipolar disorder as well. It has been promoted as causing fewer adverse effects than other antipsychotics, without sacrificing efficacy.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Oct 10;47(1219):81-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

AmpliChip CYP450 Test

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 15, 2005;  (Issue 1215)
The FDA recently cleared the AmpliChip CYP450 Test (Roche), which analyzes blood-derived DNA to detect genetic variations in the activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 and determines the...
The FDA recently cleared the AmpliChip CYP450 Test (Roche), which analyzes blood-derived DNA to detect genetic variations in the activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 and determines the metabolizer status of the patient. The test is intended to help guide clinicians in prescribing individualized drug therapy. About 25% of all drugs, including many antidepressants and antipsychotics, are substrates of either CYP2D6 or CYP2C19. The test is being promoted initially to psychiatrists.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Aug 15;47(1215):71-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Atypical Antipsychotics in the Elderly

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 1, 2005;  (Issue 1214)
The FDA has reported that 5106 elderly patients with dementia treated with atypical (second generation) antipsychotics in 17 randomized controlled trials had a higher mortality rate (4.5% vs. 2.6%) than those...
The FDA has reported that 5106 elderly patients with dementia treated with atypical (second generation) antipsychotics in 17 randomized controlled trials had a higher mortality rate (4.5% vs. 2.6%) than those receiving placebo. Most of the deaths were due to cardiovascular and infectious causes (such as pneumonia). The drugs used in the trials were aripiprazole (Abilify), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), and risperidone (Risperdal). As the increase in mortality was considered a class effect, the FDA advisory also included ziprasidone (Geodon), clozapine (Clozaril) and the olanzapine/fluoxetine combination (Symbyax). The manufacturers of all of these drugs will be required to add a "black box" warning to their labeling.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Aug 1;47(1214):61-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Extended-Release Carbamazepine (Equetro) for Bipolar Disorder

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 28, 2005;  (Issue 1205)
An extended-release formulation of carbamazepine, available since 1997 for treatment of epilepsy, has now been approved under a new name, Equetro, for acute mania and mixed episodes of bipolar disorder....
An extended-release formulation of carbamazepine, available since 1997 for treatment of epilepsy, has now been approved under a new name, Equetro, for acute mania and mixed episodes of bipolar disorder. Although the drug was effective in some patients for up to 6 months, it has not been approved for maintenance treatment. Carbamazepine has not been shown to be more effective than lithium or valproate, and it can cause serious adverse effects.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Mar 28;47(1205):27-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Choice of an Antipsychotic

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 22, 2003;  (Issue 1172)
A recent supplement to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, titled "The Expert Consensus Guideline Series: Optimizing Pharmacologic Treatment of Psychotic Disorders," concluded that most experts endorsed use of...
A recent supplement to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, titled "The Expert Consensus Guideline Series: Optimizing Pharmacologic Treatment of Psychotic Disorders," concluded that most experts endorsed use of second-generation (atypical) antipsychotics rather than first-generation drugs, with risperidone (Risperdal - Janssen) the top choice for first episodes, multiple episodes or switches from another drug (JM Kane et al, J Clin Psychiatry 2003; 64 suppl 12:5). The supplement was sponsored by Janssen.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Dec 22;45(1172):102-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Psychiatric Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2003;  (Issue 11)
The number of drugs marketed for psychiatric indications has increased sharply in recent years. The recommendations in this article are based on the results of controlled trials and on the experience and...
The number of drugs marketed for psychiatric indications has increased sharply in recent years. The recommendations in this article are based on the results of controlled trials and on the experience and opinions of Medical Letter consultants. Interactions with other drugs can be found in The Medical Letter Handbook of Adverse Drug Interactions, 2003.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2003 Jul;1(11):69-76 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Aripiprazole (Abilify) for Schizophrenia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 17, 2003;  (Issue 1150)
Aripiprazole (Abilify - Bristol-Myers Squibb/Otsuka), a quinolinone derivative, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of...
Aripiprazole (Abilify - Bristol-Myers Squibb/Otsuka), a quinolinone derivative, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of schizophrenia.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Feb 17;45(1150):15-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction