Matching articles for "Prevacid"

Addendum: Dexlansoprazole for GERD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 16, 2022;  (Issue 1650)
A reader commented that our recent article on Drugs for GERD and Peptic Ulcer Disease did not include enough information on dexlansoprazole (Dexilant, and generics), a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) claimed to...
A reader commented that our recent article on Drugs for GERD and Peptic Ulcer Disease did not include enough information on dexlansoprazole (Dexilant, and generics), a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) claimed to provide "all-day and all-night relief from heartburn". Dexlansoprazole recently became available generically, but it is much more expensive than other generic PPIs.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 May 16;64(1650):79-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for GERD and Peptic Ulcer Disease

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 4, 2022;  (Issue 1647)
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common GI condition encountered in the outpatient setting; it affects about 20% of people in the...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common GI condition encountered in the outpatient setting; it affects about 20% of people in the US.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Apr 4;64(1647):49-56 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Table: H2-Receptor Antagonists and PPIs (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 4, 2022;  (Issue 1647)
...
View the Comparison Table: H2-Receptor Antagonists and PPIs
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Apr 4;64(1647):e56-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for GERD and Peptic Ulcer Disease

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 15, 2018;  (Issue 1538)
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most frequent GI condition encountered in the outpatient setting; it affects about 20% of the US population. Heartburn and regurgitation are the classic...
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most frequent GI condition encountered in the outpatient setting; it affects about 20% of the US population. Heartburn and regurgitation are the classic symptoms of GERD.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Jan 15;60(1538):9-16 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Table: Drugs for GERD and Peptic Ulcer Disease (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 15, 2018;  (Issue 1538)
...
View the Comparison Table: Drugs for GERD and Peptic Ulcer Disease
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Jan 15;60(1538):e16-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Safety of Long-Term PPI Use

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 14, 2017;  (Issue 1527)
Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which are used for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and for prevention of upper gastrointestinal adverse effects caused by NSAIDs and aspirin, are one...
Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which are used for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and for prevention of upper gastrointestinal adverse effects caused by NSAIDs and aspirin, are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of drugs in the US. All PPIs are similarly effective and generally well tolerated, but their long-term use has been associated with a number of safety concerns. Recommendations addressing these concerns have recently been published.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Aug 14;59(1527):131-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Prescription Drug Prices in the US

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 22, 2017;  (Issue 1521)
Per capita spending on prescription drugs in the US is higher than in other industrialized nations,...
Per capita spending on prescription drugs in the US is higher than in other industrialized nations, including Canada.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 May 22;59(1521):81-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drug Interaction: Clopidogrel and PPIs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 27, 2017;  (Issue 1515)
The antiplatelet drug clopidogrel (Plavix, and others) reduces major cardiovascular events, but can cause bleeding. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are often used with clopidogrel to prevent...
The antiplatelet drug clopidogrel (Plavix, and others) reduces major cardiovascular events, but can cause bleeding. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are often used with clopidogrel to prevent gastrointestinal bleeding, however, some evidence suggests that PPIs may interfere with the activation of clopidogrel and diminish its antiplatelet effect. FDA-approved labeling recommends avoiding concurrent use of the PPIs omeprazole and esomeprazole with clopidogrel.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Feb 27;59(1515):39-40 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: PPIs and Torsades de Pointes

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 5, 2016;  (Issue 1509)
Therapeutics (AZCERT) has recently added the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) omeprazole (Prilosec, and others), esomeprazole (Nexium, and others), lansoprazole (Prevacid, and others), and pantoprazole (Protonix,...
Therapeutics (AZCERT) has recently added the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) omeprazole (Prilosec, and others), esomeprazole (Nexium, and others), lansoprazole (Prevacid, and others), and pantoprazole (Protonix, and generics) to its lists of Drugs with Conditional Risk of Torsades de Pointes (TdP) and Drugs to Avoid in Patients with Congenital Long QT Syndrome.1

PPIs do not directly cause prolongation of the QT interval, but they can cause hypomagnesemia, which is often accompanied by hypocalcemia and hypokalemia and can result in cardiac repolarization disturbances such as QT interval prolongation.2 Reports have described cases of QT interval prolongation and TdP associated with severe PPI-induced hypomagnesemia.3,4 TdP has also been reported in patients taking a PPI concomitantly with drugs that directly prolong the QT interval.5,6 The newer PPIs dexlansoprazole (Dexilant) and rabeprazole (Aciphex, and generics) have not been linked to QT interval prolongation or TdP to date, but they have been associated with hypomagnesemia.

Serum magnesium levels should be monitored periodically in patients taking a PPI for an extended period of time (>2 weeks). If possible, extended PPI therapy should be avoided in patients who require treatment with drugs that carry a known risk of TdP7 and in those with long QT syndrome. If extended PPI therapy must be used with a drug that prolongs the QT interval, close monitoring of magnesium levels and the QT interval is recommended.

  1. AZCERT. New drugs added to CredibleMeds drugs lists. November 2, 2016. Available at: www.crediblemeds.org. Accessed November 22, 2016.
  2. In brief: PPIs and hypomagnesemia. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2011; 53:25.
  3. EJ Hoorn et al. A case series of proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia. Am J Kidney Dis 2010; 56:112.
  4. BA Hansen and Ø Bruserud. Hypomagnesemia as a potentially life-threatening adverse effect of omeprazole. Oxf Med Case Reports 2016; 2016:147.
  5. H Asajima et al. Lansoprazole precipitated QT prolongation and torsade de pointes associated with disopyramide. Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2012; 68:331.
  6. JN Bibawy et al. Pantoprazole (proton pump inhibitor) contributing to torsades de pointes storm. Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol 2013; 6:e17.
  7. RL Woosley and KA Romero. QT drugs list. Available at: www.crediblemeds. org. Accessed November 22, 2016.


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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Dec 5;58(1509):153 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Which PPI?

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 22, 2015;  (Issue 1471)
An article published in the New York Times on May 1, 2015 listed the 10 drugs on which Medicare Part D spent the most in 2013. The most costly ($2.53 billion) was the proton pump inhibitor (PPI)...
An article published in the New York Times on May 1, 2015 listed the 10 drugs on which Medicare Part D spent the most in 2013. The most costly ($2.53 billion) was the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) Nexium (esomeprazole magnesium), which has recently become available generically.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Jun 22;57(1471):91 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antithrombotic Drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 27, 2014;  (Issue 1454)
Antiplatelet drugs are the drugs of choice for prevention and treatment of arterial thrombosis. Anticoagulants are the drugs of choice for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and...
Antiplatelet drugs are the drugs of choice for prevention and treatment of arterial thrombosis. Anticoagulants are the drugs of choice for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and for prevention of cardioembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Oct 27;56(1454):103-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Esomeprazole Strontium

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 21, 2014;  (Issue 1447)
The FDA has approved the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) esomeprazole strontium for use in adults for the same indications as esomeprazole magnesium (Nexium): treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD),...
The FDA has approved the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) esomeprazole strontium for use in adults for the same indications as esomeprazole magnesium (Nexium): treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), prevention of NSAID-induced gastric ulcers, eradication of Helicobacter pylori, and treatment of pathological hypersecretory conditions. It was first marketed in December 2013 as a branded drug (Esomeprazole Strontium) and a month later as a generic drug.

Strontium is incorporated into bone. It is not recommended for use in children or during pregnancy because of the absence of safety data in those populations. Use of esomeprazole strontium is not recommended for patients with severe renal impairment.

Esomeprazole strontium is the seventh PPI to become available as a single agent in the US. No new clinical trials were required for its approval, which was based on earlier clinical trials with esomeprazole magnesium. All of the PPIs appear to be equally effective.1

  1. Drugs for peptic ulcer disease and GERD. Treat Guidel Med Lett 2014; 12:25.


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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Jul 21;56(1447):64 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Peptic Ulcer Disease and GERD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2014;  (Issue 140)
H2-RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS (H2RAs) — Currently available H2RAs are listed in Table 1. These drugs inhibit the action of histamine at the H2-receptor of the gastric parietal cell, decreasing basal acid...
H2-RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS (H2RAs) — Currently available H2RAs are listed in Table 1. These drugs inhibit the action of histamine at the H2-receptor of the gastric parietal cell, decreasing basal acid secretion and, to a lesser degree, food-stimulated acid secretion. All H2RAs are about equally effective for treatment of PUD and GERD. H2RAs are faster acting than PPIs in relieving symptoms of dyspepsia or GERD, but they are not as effective as PPIs in relieving symptoms or in healing erosive esophagitis. Repeated administration of H2RAs leads to pharmacologic tolerance and has been associated with the development of new dyspeptic symptoms. Rebound acid hypersecretion can occur after stopping H2RAs.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2014 Apr;12(140):25-30 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Peptic Ulcer Disease and GERD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2011;  (Issue 109)
Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is usually caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or by infection with Helicobacter pylori. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be caused by...
Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is usually caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or by infection with Helicobacter pylori. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be caused by transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation, reduced lower esophageal sphincter tone, hiatal hernia, delayed gastric emptying or hormonal changes due to pregnancy. Acid suppressive therapy is the cornerstone of management for both PUD and GERD.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2011 Sep;9(109):55-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Primary Prevention of Ulcers in Patients Taking Aspirin or NSAIDs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 8, 2010;  (Issue 1333)
Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are common causes of peptic ulcer disease. Patients infected with Helicobacter pylori who take aspirin or another NSAID have an especially high...
Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are common causes of peptic ulcer disease. Patients infected with Helicobacter pylori who take aspirin or another NSAID have an especially high risk. Drugs that have been tried for prevention of ulcers in patients taking NSAIDs including H2-receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), aluminum- or magnesium-containing antacids, the prostaglandin misoprostol (Cytotec, and others), and antibiotics to eradicate H. pylori.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2010 Mar 8;52(1333):17-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Dexlansoprazole (Kapidex) for GERD and Erosive Esophagitis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 23, 2009;  (Issue 1308)
The FDA has approved the proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) dexlansoprazole (Kapidex - Takeda), a delayed release formulation of the R-enantiomer of lansoprazole (Prevacid - Takeda), for treating and maintaining...
The FDA has approved the proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) dexlansoprazole (Kapidex - Takeda), a delayed release formulation of the R-enantiomer of lansoprazole (Prevacid - Takeda), for treating and maintaining healing of erosive esophagitis and for treatment of heartburn associated with non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Mar 23;51(1308):21-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

PPI Interactions with Clopidogrel

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 12, 2009;  (Issue 1303)
Clopidogrel (Plavix), which prevents arterial thrombosis by inhibiting platelet activation, is commonly prescribed (usually with aspirin) for months after acute coronary syndromes and stent implantation. It may...
Clopidogrel (Plavix), which prevents arterial thrombosis by inhibiting platelet activation, is commonly prescribed (usually with aspirin) for months after acute coronary syndromes and stent implantation. It may also, however, increase the risk of bleeding. Therefore, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) such as omeprazole (Prilosec, and others) is often given concurrently to decrease the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Some reports have suggested that omeprazole may interfere with the antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Jan 12;51(1303):2-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Treatment of Peptic Ulcers and GERD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 1, 2008;  (Issue 72)
Peptic ulcers caused by treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are mainly gastric ulcers. Most duodenal and other gastric ulcers are caused by the gram-negative bacillus Helicobacter...
Peptic ulcers caused by treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are mainly gastric ulcers. Most duodenal and other gastric ulcers are caused by the gram-negative bacillus Helicobacter pylori. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is caused by gastric acid reflux into the esophagus. Drugs that suppress gastric acid production are the primary treatment for GERD and peptic ulcers.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2008 Aug;6(72):55-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Proton Pump Inhibitors for GERD in Children

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 26, 2007;  (Issue 1255)
A recent advertisement for the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole (Prevacid - TAP) suggests that children who cough at night, complain of abdominal pain, refuse to eat, or have a bad taste in their mouths...
A recent advertisement for the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole (Prevacid - TAP) suggests that children who cough at night, complain of abdominal pain, refuse to eat, or have a bad taste in their mouths may all have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A Bunny's Tummy Trouble, a children's book about GERD published by TAP, is now available as a patient handout in pediatricians' waiting rooms. The use of acid-suppressive drugs in infants and children has increased markedly in recent years and many of these drugs are now available in child-friendly formulations. A table in the article lists some of the drugs used to treat GERD in children.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2007 Feb 26;49(1255):17-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

AmpliChip CYP450 Test

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 15, 2005;  (Issue 1215)
The FDA recently cleared the AmpliChip CYP450 Test (Roche), which analyzes blood-derived DNA to detect genetic variations in the activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 and determines the...
The FDA recently cleared the AmpliChip CYP450 Test (Roche), which analyzes blood-derived DNA to detect genetic variations in the activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 and determines the metabolizer status of the patient. The test is intended to help guide clinicians in prescribing individualized drug therapy. About 25% of all drugs, including many antidepressants and antipsychotics, are substrates of either CYP2D6 or CYP2C19. The test is being promoted initially to psychiatrists.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Aug 15;47(1215):71-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Peptic Ulcers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 1, 2004;  (Issue 18)
Most peptic ulcers not caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with infection of the gastric mucosa by the gram-negative bacilli Helicobacter pylori. The majority of NSAID-related...
Most peptic ulcers not caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with infection of the gastric mucosa by the gram-negative bacilli Helicobacter pylori. The majority of NSAID-related ulcers are gastric. H. pylori infection causes both duodenal and gastric ulcers. Eradication of H. pylori promotes healing and markedly decreases recurrence of both duodenal and gastric ulcers (A Shiotamni and DY Graham, Med Clin North Am 2002; 86:1447; FKL Chan and WK Leung, Lancet 2002; 360:933). The first step in the management of peptic ulcers is the diagnosis and treatment of H. pylori.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2004 Feb;2(18):7-12 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drug Interactions

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 8, 2003;  (Issue 1158)
Changes caused by one drug in the absorption, distribution, metabolism or excretion of another may lead to a pharmacokinetic adverse drug interaction (DN Juurlink et al, JAMA 2003; 289:1652). Additive drug...
Changes caused by one drug in the absorption, distribution, metabolism or excretion of another may lead to a pharmacokinetic adverse drug interaction (DN Juurlink et al, JAMA 2003; 289:1652). Additive drug interactions, such as vasodilation caused by both sildenafil (Viagra) and nitrates, can also have adverse effects.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Jun 8;45(1158):46-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Esomeprazole (Nexium)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 30, 2001;  (Issue 1103)
Esomeprazole magnesium (Nexium - AstraZeneca), the S-isomer of omeprazole (Prilosec), is the fifth benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor to become available in the United States. Omeprazole, which was the first,...
Esomeprazole magnesium (Nexium - AstraZeneca), the S-isomer of omeprazole (Prilosec), is the fifth benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor to become available in the United States. Omeprazole, which was the first, is going off patent this year.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2001 Apr 30;43(1103):36-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Pantroprazole (Protonix)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 24, 2000;  (Issue 1083)
Pantoprazole, the fourth benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor to become available in the United States, has been marketed for short-term oral treatment of erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease...
Pantoprazole, the fourth benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor to become available in the United States, has been marketed for short-term oral treatment of erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 Jul 24;42(1083):65-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Rabeprazole

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 19, 1999;  (Issue 1066)
Rabeprazole, a benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor similar to omeprazole and lansoprazole, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of duodenal ulcers, healing and maintenance treatment of erosive or...
Rabeprazole, a benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor similar to omeprazole and lansoprazole, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of duodenal ulcers, healing and maintenance treatment of erosive or ulcerative gastroesophageal reflux disease, and for long-term treatment of chronic hypersecretory conditions, including Zollinger-Ellison syndrome
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1999 Nov 19;41(1066):110-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Systemic Antifungal Drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 12, 1997;  (Issue 1009)
The drugs of choice for treatment of deep fungal infections are listed in the table below. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the...
The drugs of choice for treatment of deep fungal infections are listed in the table below. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1997 Sep 12;39(1009):86-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Treatment of Peptic Ulcers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 3, 1997;  (Issue 991)
Most peptic ulcers not caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are now thought to be associated with infection of the gastric mucosa by the gram-negative bacilli Helicobacter pylori. The...
Most peptic ulcers not caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are now thought to be associated with infection of the gastric mucosa by the gram-negative bacilli Helicobacter pylori. The majority of NSAID-related ulcers are gastric. H. pylori have been associated with both duodenal and gastric ulcers. Eradication of H. pylori promotes healing and markedly decreases recurrence of both duodenal and gastric ulcers (AH Soll, JAMA, 275:622, 1996).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1997 Jan 3;39(991):1-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Systemic Antifungal Drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 2, 1996;  (Issue 967)
The drugs of choice for treatment of deep fungal infections are listed in the table on page 101. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the US Food and Drug...
The drugs of choice for treatment of deep fungal infections are listed in the table on page 101. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. More detailed guidelines are available from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (J Sobel et al, Clin Infect Dis, volume 30, April 2000).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1996 Feb 2;38(967):10-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Lansoprazole

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 21, 1995;  (Issue 953)
Lansoprazole (Prevacid -TAP), a proton pump inhibitor similar to omeprazole (Prilosec - Medical Letter, 32:19, 1990), has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for short-term treatment of...
Lansoprazole (Prevacid -TAP), a proton pump inhibitor similar to omeprazole (Prilosec - Medical Letter, 32:19, 1990), has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for short-term treatment of active duodenal ulcer and erosive reflux esophagitis and for long-term treatment of chronic hypersecretory conditions, including the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1995 Jul 21;37(953):63-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction