Matching articles for "FluMist"

Influenza Vaccine for 2022-2023

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 3, 2022;  (Issue 1660)
Annual vaccination in the US against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Influenza vaccines that are available in the US for the 2022-2023...
Annual vaccination in the US against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Influenza vaccines that are available in the US for the 2022-2023 season are listed in Table 2.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Oct 3;64(1660):153-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza for 2021-2022

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 10, 2022;  (Issue 1641)
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but complications such as pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur, especially in patients at higher risk for complications (see Table 1). Antiviral...
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but complications such as pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur, especially in patients at higher risk for complications (see Table 1). Antiviral drugs recommended for treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza this season are listed in Table 2. Updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Jan 10;64(1641):2-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Chart: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza for 2021-2022 (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 10, 2022;  (Issue 1641)
...
View the Comparison Chart: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza for 2021-2022
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Jan 10;64(1641):e1-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2021-2022

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 4, 2021;  (Issue 1634)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication.1 Available influenza vaccines for the 2021-2022 season are listed in Table...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication.1 Available influenza vaccines for the 2021-2022 season are listed in Table 2.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Oct 4;63(1634):153-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza for 2020-2021

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 2, 2020;  (Issue 1610)
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but complications such as pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur, especially in patients at increased risk for influenza complications (see Table...
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but complications such as pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur, especially in patients at increased risk for influenza complications (see Table 1). Antiviral drugs recommended for treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza this season are listed in Table 2. Updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Nov 2;62(1610):169-73 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2020-2021

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 21, 2020;  (Issue 1607)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Vaccination of all eligible persons can reduce the prevalence of influenza illness...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Vaccination of all eligible persons can reduce the prevalence of influenza illness and symptoms that might be confused with those of COVID-19. Available vaccines and recommendations for specific patient populations for the 2020-2021 season are listed in Tables 2 and 3. Lower rates of influenza illness have been observed this season in the Southern Hemisphere, probably because of masking, social distancing, school closures, and travel restrictions.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Sep 21;62(1607):145-50 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 13, 2020;  (Issue 1589)
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur. FDA-approved antiviral drugs for influenza are listed in Table 2. The neuraminidase inhibitors...
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur. FDA-approved antiviral drugs for influenza are listed in Table 2. The neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir (Tamiflu, and generics), which is taken orally, and zanamivir (Relenza), which is inhaled, are approved for prophylaxis and treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza. The IV neuraminidase inhibitor peramivir (Rapivab) and the oral polymerase acidic (PA) endonuclease inhibitor baloxavir marboxil (Xofluza) are approved only for treatment. All of these drugs are active against both influenza A and influenza B viruses. Updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Jan 13;62(1589):1-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2019-2020

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 21, 2019;  (Issue 1583)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Available vaccines and recommendations for specific patient populations for the...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Available vaccines and recommendations for specific patient populations for the 2019-2020 season are listed in Tables 2 and 3.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Oct 21;61(1583):161-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Treatment and Prophylaxis of Seasonal Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 14, 2019;  (Issue 1563)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of seasonal influenza (see Table 1). Frequently updated information on influenza activity, influenza testing, and antiviral resistance is...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of seasonal influenza (see Table 1). Frequently updated information on influenza activity, influenza testing, and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Jan 14;61(1563):1-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2018-2019

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 22, 2018;  (Issue 1558)
Routine annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old. Recommendations for the current season for specific patient populations are listed in Tables 2 and...
Routine annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old. Recommendations for the current season for specific patient populations are listed in Tables 2 and 4.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Oct 22;60(1558):169-73 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza 2017-2018

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 1, 2018;  (Issue 1537)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. Frequently updated information on influenza activity, testing for influenza, and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. Frequently updated information on influenza activity, testing for influenza, and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Jan 1;60(1537):1-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2017-2018

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 9, 2017;  (Issue 1531)
Routine annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a specific...
Routine annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a specific contraindication.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Oct 9;59(1531):163-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2016-2017

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 10, 2016;  (Issue 1505)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a specific...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a specific contraindication.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Oct 10;58(1505):127-30 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2015-2016

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 14, 2015;  (Issue 1477)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a specific...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a specific contraindication.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Sep 14;57(1477):125-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Peramivir (Rapivab): An IV Neuraminidase Inhibitor for Treatment of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 2, 2015;  (Issue 1461)
The FDA has approved peramivir (Rapivab – BioCryst), an IV neuraminidase inhibitor administered as a single dose, for treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients ≥18 years old who have had...
The FDA has approved peramivir (Rapivab – BioCryst), an IV neuraminidase inhibitor administered as a single dose, for treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients ≥18 years old who have had symptoms for no more than 2 days. Peramivir was available temporarily in the US during the 2009-2010 influenza season under an emergency use authorization for treatment of hospitalized patients. It has been available in some Asian countries since 2010. Peramivir is the third neuraminidase inhibitor to be approved in the US. Oseltamivir (Tamiflu), which is taken orally, and zanamivir (Relenza), which is inhaled, are approved for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza in children and adults.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Feb 2;57(1461):17-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza 2014-2015

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 8, 2014;  (Issue 1457)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Dec 8;56(1457):121-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2014-2015

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 13, 2014;  (Issue 1453)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses has been shown to decrease influenza illness and...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses has been shown to decrease influenza illness and its complications.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Oct 13;56(1453):97-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Adult Immunization

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 2014;  (Issue 142)
Vaccines recommended for adults residing in the US are reviewed here. Vaccines for travel have been reviewed separately. Eight vaccines are currently recommended by the US Advisory Committee on...
Vaccines recommended for adults residing in the US are reviewed here. Vaccines for travel have been reviewed separately.

Eight vaccines are currently recommended by the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for routine use in adults at various ages...
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2014 Jun;12(142):39-48 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza 2013-2014

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 20, 2014;  (Issue 1434)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on antiviral resistance is available at...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on antiviral resistance is available at www.cdc.gov.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Jan 20;56(1434):6-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2013-2014

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 16, 2013;  (Issue 1425)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses has been shown to decrease influenza illness and its complications. Several new vaccines are available for the current...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses has been shown to decrease influenza illness and its complications. Several new vaccines are available for the current season.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2013 Sep 16;55(1425):73-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza 2012-2013

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 10, 2012;  (Issue 1405)
Antiviral drugs can be used as an adjunct to vaccination for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza. In recent years, the susceptibility of circulating influenza virus strains has evolved rapidly and...
Antiviral drugs can be used as an adjunct to vaccination for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza. In recent years, the susceptibility of circulating influenza virus strains has evolved rapidly and treatment recommendations have changed during the influenza season. Frequently updated information on antiviral resistance is available at www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/antivirals.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2012 Dec 10;54(1405):97-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2012-2013

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 1, 2012;  (Issue 1400)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is the most effective method of preventing influenza and has been shown to decrease influenza illness and its complications. A new vaccine is available...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is the most effective method of preventing influenza and has been shown to decrease influenza illness and its complications. A new vaccine is available for the current season. Chemoprophylaxis and treatment of influenza was discussed in an earlier issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2012 Oct 1;54(1400):77-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Adult Immunizations

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 1, 2011;  (Issue 112)
Vaccines recommended for routine use in US adults are reviewed here. Vaccines for travel have been reviewed...
Vaccines recommended for routine use in US adults are reviewed here. Vaccines for travel have been reviewed separately.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2011 Dec;9(112):75-82 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2011-2012

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 17, 2011;  (Issue 1375)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is the most effective method of preventing influenza and has been shown to decrease influenza illness and complications. For the current season, a...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is the most effective method of preventing influenza and has been shown to decrease influenza illness and complications. For the current season, a new inactivated intradermal vaccine (Fluzone Intradermal) has been FDA-approved for use in adults 18-64 years old. An upcoming issue will review chemoprophylaxis and treatment of influenza.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Oct 17;53(1375):81-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Seasonal Trivalent Influenza Vaccine for 2010-2011

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 4, 2010;  (Issue 1348)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is the most effective method of preventing influenza. An upcoming issue of The Medical Letter will review drugs for chemoprophylaxis and treatment of...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is the most effective method of preventing influenza. An upcoming issue of The Medical Letter will review drugs for chemoprophylaxis and treatment of influenza.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2010 Oct 4;52(1348):77-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 16, 2009;  (Issue 1325)
Currently circulating influenza virus is almost universally pandemic 2009 influenza A H1N1, but seasonal influenza strains could also appear soon. Antiviral drugs are an important adjunct to influenza...
Currently circulating influenza virus is almost universally pandemic 2009 influenza A H1N1, but seasonal influenza strains could also appear soon. Antiviral drugs are an important adjunct to influenza vaccination for treatment and chemoprophylaxis of both pandemic and seasonal influenza. They may, however, interfere with the efficacy of FluMist, the live-attenuated intranasal vaccine, if they are administered within 48 hours before or <2 weeks after FluMist administration. Inactivated vaccines are not affected by antiviral drug therapy.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Nov 16;51(1325):89-92 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Seasonal Trivalent Influenza Vaccine for 2009-2010

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 21, 2009;  (Issue 1321)
Two separate influenza vaccines will be available this season: the usual seasonal trivalent vaccine and a monovalent vaccine (not yet licensed by the FDA) directed at the novel H1N1 virus currently causing...
Two separate influenza vaccines will be available this season: the usual seasonal trivalent vaccine and a monovalent vaccine (not yet licensed by the FDA) directed at the novel H1N1 virus currently causing pandemic infection. The next issue of the Medical Letter will review the pandemic H1N1 vaccine.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Sep 21;51(1321):73-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Adult Immunization

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2009;  (Issue 80)
Although immunization programs have produced high vaccination rates in US infants and children, similar successes have not been achieved in adults. Vaccines recommended for routine use in adults are reviewed...
Although immunization programs have produced high vaccination rates in US infants and children, similar successes have not been achieved in adults. Vaccines recommended for routine use in adults are reviewed here. Vaccines for travel are reviewed separately.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2009 Apr;7(80):27-36 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine 2008-2009

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 6, 2008;  (Issue 1296)
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce influenza complications. Changes this year include a vaccine with three new...
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce influenza complications. Changes this year include a vaccine with three new influenza antigens and expanded age criteria to include all children 6 months to 18 years of age. An upcoming issue of The Medical Letter will review drugs for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Oct 6;50(1296):77-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine 2007-2008

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 8, 2007;  (Issue 1271)
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce associated complications....
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce associated complications.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2007 Oct 8;49(1271):81-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine 2006-2007

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 9, 2006;  (Issue 1245)
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce associated...
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce associated complications.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2006 Oct 9;48(1245):81-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Adult Immunization

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2006;  (Issue 47)
Although immunization programs have produced high vaccination rates in US infants and children, similar successes have not been achieved in adults. Vaccines recommended for routine use in adults are reviewed...
Although immunization programs have produced high vaccination rates in US infants and children, similar successes have not been achieved in adults. Vaccines recommended for routine use in adults are reviewed here. Immunizations for travel were reviewed in a recent issue.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2006 Jul;4(47):47-54 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 21, 2005;  (Issue 1222)
Antiviral prophylaxis is indicated for influenza exposures that occur before (or less than 2 weeks after) vaccination with inactivated vaccine, or in years when circulating strains differ from those included in...
Antiviral prophylaxis is indicated for influenza exposures that occur before (or less than 2 weeks after) vaccination with inactivated vaccine, or in years when circulating strains differ from those included in the vaccine. Antiviral drugs can also be used for treatment of patients who develop symptoms of influenza, regardless of vaccination status.
Please see Update: Influenza Resistance to Amantadine and Rimantadine
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Nov 21;47(1222):93-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine 2005-2006

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 24, 2005;  (Issue 1220)
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce associated complications. A future issue of The Medical Letter will review drug...
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce associated complications. A future issue of The Medical Letter will review drug prophylaxis and treatment of influenza.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Oct 24;47(1220):85-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 25, 2004;  (Issue 1194)
Due to the unanticipated shortage in the US supply of inactivated influenza vaccine, many persons who normally would have received the vaccine will be unable to get it this year. Antiviral drugs can be used...
Due to the unanticipated shortage in the US supply of inactivated influenza vaccine, many persons who normally would have received the vaccine will be unable to get it this year. Antiviral drugs can be used for prophylaxis of unvaccinated persons who are exposed to influenza, and for treatment of both vaccinated and unvaccinated patients who develop symptoms of the disease.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Oct 25;46(1194):85-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine 2004-2005

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 11, 2004;  (Issue 1193)
Last year influenza season began in October, peaked in December (both much earlier than usual), and was associated with severe disease, particularly in children. Much of the illness was due to a circulating...
Last year influenza season began in October, peaked in December (both much earlier than usual), and was associated with severe disease, particularly in children. Much of the illness was due to a circulating influenza A H3N2 strain (Fujian type) that had drifted antigenically from the H3N2 strain in the vaccine. The vaccine for the 2004-05 influenza season includes A/Wyoming/3/2003 (H3N2), which is antigenically equivalent to the Fujian strain, A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1), which is unchanged, and a new B strain, either B/Jiangsu/10/2003 or B/Jilin/20/2003, which are both antigenically equivalent to B/Shanghai/361/2002.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Oct 11;46(1193):83-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

FluMist: An Intranasal Live Influenza Vaccine - Addendum

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 16, 2004;  (Issue 1176)
Addendum: FluMist Storage: The storage requirements for FluMist, the intranasal live-attenuated influenza vaccine (Medical Letter 2003; 45:65) have changed. New data have shown that frost-free freezers are...
Addendum: FluMist Storage: The storage requirements for FluMist, the intranasal live-attenuated influenza vaccine (Medical Letter 2003; 45:65) have changed. New data have shown that frost-free freezers are appropriate for storage for at least 3 months, without need for a freezer-box insert.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Feb 16;46(1176):16 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Prevention 2003-2004

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 29, 2003;  (Issue 1166)
Unlike the last few years there is no early-season shortage of influenza vaccine. Immunization programs for all recommended individuals can proceed. There are 2 new influenza vaccine formulations available...
Unlike the last few years there is no early-season shortage of influenza vaccine. Immunization programs for all recommended individuals can proceed. There are 2 new influenza vaccine formulations available this year, FluMist, an intranasal vaccine and Fluzone, a pediatric formulation. Timing, indications, adverse effects, dosage and cost of the vaccines is discussed. The drugs that can be used for prophylaxis of influenza are also reviewed.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Sep 29;45(1166):78-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

FluMist: An Intranasal Live Influenza Vaccine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 19, 2003;  (Issue 1163)
FluMist (MedImmune), the first live-attenuated and first intranasally administered influenza vaccine, has been approved by the FDA to prevent influenza in healthy people 5-49 years old. Given as a nasal spray,...
FluMist (MedImmune), the first live-attenuated and first intranasally administered influenza vaccine, has been approved by the FDA to prevent influenza in healthy people 5-49 years old. Given as a nasal spray, it stimulates immunity by viral replication in the upper respiratory tract. This vaccine apparently will be advertised directly to the public as a "needle-free" alternative to intramuscular influenza vaccine.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Aug 19;45(1163):65-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction