Matching articles for "Gabapentin"

Drugs for Chronic Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 9, 2023;  (Issue 1667)
Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is recommended for initial treatment of chronic insomnia. CBT-I includes stimulus control, sleep education and hygiene, sleep restriction, relaxation...
Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is recommended for initial treatment of chronic insomnia. CBT-I includes stimulus control, sleep education and hygiene, sleep restriction, relaxation training, and cognitive therapy. When CBT-I alone is not effective, pharmacologic treatment should be added.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2023 Jan 9;65(1667):1-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Nonopioid Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 7, 2022;  (Issue 1645)
Nonopioid drugs can be used in the treatment of many nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. For severe pain, especially severe chronic cancer pain, use of opioids may be necessary....
Nonopioid drugs can be used in the treatment of many nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. For severe pain, especially severe chronic cancer pain, use of opioids may be necessary. Noninvasive nonpharmacologic treatments, including physical and psychological therapies, have been shown to improve pain and function in patients with some common chronic pain conditions and are unlikely to cause serious harms. A multimodal approach to analgesic therapy can increase pain control while reducing opioid use and adverse effects.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Mar 7;64(1645):33-40 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Difelikefalin (Korsuva) for Chronic Kidney Disease-Associated Pruritus

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 7, 2022;  (Issue 1643)
Difelikefalin (Korsuva – Vifor), an IV kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate to severe pruritus associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in adults...
Difelikefalin (Korsuva – Vifor), an IV kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate to severe pruritus associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in adults on hemodialysis. It is the first drug to be approved for this indication and the first KOR agonist to become available in the US. Difelikefalin has not been studied in patients on peritoneal dialysis.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Feb 7;64(1643):18-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Alcohol Use Disorder

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 13, 2021;  (Issue 1639)
Consumption of alcohol has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5) defines alcohol use disorder (AUD; previously called...
Consumption of alcohol has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5) defines alcohol use disorder (AUD; previously called alcohol dependence) as meeting ≥2 of the 11 criteria listed in Table 1 in the past year. The lifetime prevalence of AUD in the US population has been estimated to be about 30%. Despite this high prevalence and the associated morbidity, mortality, and costs, only 3 drugs are FDA-approved for treatment of the disorder.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Dec 13;63(1639):193-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Menopausal Symptoms

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 10, 2020;  (Issue 1604)
The primary symptoms of menopause are genitourinary (genitourinary syndrome of menopause; GSM) and vasomotor (VMS). Vulvovaginal atrophy can cause vaginal burning, irritation and dryness, dyspareunia,...
The primary symptoms of menopause are genitourinary (genitourinary syndrome of menopause; GSM) and vasomotor (VMS). Vulvovaginal atrophy can cause vaginal burning, irritation and dryness, dyspareunia, and dysuria, and increase the risk of urinary tract infections. Vasomotor symptoms ("hot flashes") cause daytime discomfort and night sweats that may disrupt sleep. Hormone therapy is the most effective treatment for both genitourinary and vasomotor symptoms.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Aug 10;62(1604):124-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Respiratory Depression with Gabapentinoids

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 2020;  (Issue 1599)
The FDA has required new warnings in the labels of gabapentin (Neurontin, and others) and pregabalin (Lyrica, Lyrica CR, and generics) about the risk of life-threatening or fatal respiratory depression in...
The FDA has required new warnings in the labels of gabapentin (Neurontin, and others) and pregabalin (Lyrica, Lyrica CR, and generics) about the risk of life-threatening or fatal respiratory depression in patients with respiratory risk factors. Respiratory risk factors include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and concurrent use of opioids or other CNS depressants. Elderly patients are also at increased risk.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Jun 1;62(1599):81 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Anxiety Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 12, 2019;  (Issue 1578)
Anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and various phobias) are the most common form of psychiatric illness. They can be treated effectively with cognitive...
Anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and various phobias) are the most common form of psychiatric illness. They can be treated effectively with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and/or pharmacotherapy. Obsessive-compulsive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder are now considered separate entities in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5); they can also be treated with CBT and many of the same drugs.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Aug 12;61(1578):121-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

ZTlido - A New Lidocaine Patch for Postherpetic Neuralgia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 25, 2019;  (Issue 1568)
A lidocaine 1.8% patch (ZTlido – Scilex) has been approved by the FDA for treatment of pain associated with postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). A lidocaine 5% patch (Lidoderm, and generics) was approved...
A lidocaine 1.8% patch (ZTlido – Scilex) has been approved by the FDA for treatment of pain associated with postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). A lidocaine 5% patch (Lidoderm, and generics) was approved earlier for the same indication and has been used off-label for treatment of other types of localized pain. Both of these patches are available only by prescription. Lidocaine 4% patches (Aspercreme, IcyHot, and others) are available over the counter for back, neck, shoulder, and joint pain.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Mar 25;61(1568):41-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Oxybutynin for Hot Flashes in Women with Breast Cancer

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 25, 2019;  (Issue 1566)
Interim results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial suggest that off-label use of the anticholinergic drug oxybutynin may reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes in women with breast...
Interim results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial suggest that off-label use of the anticholinergic drug oxybutynin may reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes in women with breast cancer. Extended-release oral oxybutynin (Ditropan XL, and generics) has been shown to reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes in healthy menopausal women.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Feb 25;61(1566):30-1 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Chronic Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 17, 2018;  (Issue 1562)
Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is recommended for initial treatment of chronic insomnia. Pharmacologic treatment should be used in addition to CBT-I when CBT-I alone is not...
Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is recommended for initial treatment of chronic insomnia. Pharmacologic treatment should be used in addition to CBT-I when CBT-I alone is not effective.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Dec 17;60(1562):201-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Nonopioid Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 12, 2018;  (Issue 1540)
Nonopioid drugs can be used in the treatment of many nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. Use of opioids for pain will be reviewed in a future...
Nonopioid drugs can be used in the treatment of many nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. Use of opioids for pain will be reviewed in a future issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Feb 12;60(1540):24-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Epilepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 31, 2017;  (Issue 1526)
Treatment of epilepsy should begin with a single antiepileptic drug (AED), increasing its dosage gradually until seizures are controlled or adverse effects become intolerable. If seizures...
Treatment of epilepsy should begin with a single antiepileptic drug (AED), increasing its dosage gradually until seizures are controlled or adverse effects become intolerable. If seizures persist, specialists generally recommend trying at least one and sometimes a second alternative drug as monotherapy before considering use of two drugs concurrently. When used for the appropriate seizure type, AEDs are roughly equivalent in efficacy. Drug choice is usually based on factors such as ease of use, adverse effects, drug interactions, presence of comorbidities, and cost.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Jul 31;59(1526):121-30 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Table: Some Oral Antiepileptic Drugs (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 31, 2017;  (Issue 1526)
...
View the Comparison Table: Some Oral Antiepileptic Drugs
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Jul 31;59(1526):e130-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 6, 2015;  (Issue 1472)
Pharmacological treatment of insomnia includes prescription drugs, non-prescription medications, and "natural" remedies. Behavioral approaches such as cognitive behavioral therapy, which are not...
Pharmacological treatment of insomnia includes prescription drugs, non-prescription medications, and "natural" remedies. Behavioral approaches such as cognitive behavioral therapy, which are not discussed here, are also used. Pharmacologic treatment and behavioral therapy are often combined.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Jul 6;57(1472):95-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2013;  (Issue 128)
Pain can be acute or chronic. The two major types of chronic pain are nociceptive pain and neuropathic pain. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less...
Pain can be acute or chronic. The two major types of chronic pain are nociceptive pain and neuropathic pain. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less responsive to opioids and is often treated with adjuvant drugs such as antidepressants and antiepileptics. Combining different types of analgesics may provide an additive analgesic effect without increasing adverse effects.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Apr;11(128):31-42 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Epilepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 1, 2013;  (Issue 126)
Treatment of epilepsy should begin with a single drug, increasing the dosage gradually until seizures are controlled or adverse effects become unacceptable. If seizures persist, expert clinicians...
Treatment of epilepsy should begin with a single drug, increasing the dosage gradually until seizures are controlled or adverse effects become unacceptable. If seizures persist, expert clinicians generally prescribe at least one and sometimes a second alternative drug as monotherapy before considering use of two drugs at the same time. When used for the appropriate seizure type, antiepileptic drugs are roughly equivalent in efficacy. The choice of drug is usually based on factors such as ease of use, adverse effects, interactions with other drugs, presence of comorbid conditions and cost.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Feb;11(126):9-18 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Ezogabine (Potiga) for Epilepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 20, 2012;  (Issue 1397)
The FDA has approved ezogabine (ee-ZOE-ga-been; Potiga – GSK/Valeant) for oral adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures in adults. Ezogabine is available in Europe as retigabine...
The FDA has approved ezogabine (ee-ZOE-ga-been; Potiga – GSK/Valeant) for oral adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures in adults. Ezogabine is available in Europe as retigabine (Trobalt).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2012 Aug 20;54(1397):65-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Insomnia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2012;  (Issue 119)
Pharmacological treatment of insomnia includes prescription drugs, non-prescription medications and "natural" remedies. Behavioral changes are often needed as...
Pharmacological treatment of insomnia includes prescription drugs, non-prescription medications and "natural" remedies. Behavioral changes are often needed as well.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2012 Jul;10(119):57-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Menopausal Symptoms

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 28, 2012;  (Issue 1391)
The primary symptoms of menopause are vasomotor and genitourinary. Vasomotor symptoms ("hot flashes") cause daytime discomfort and chronic insomnia. A thin, dry vaginal lining and thin urethral mucosa can...
The primary symptoms of menopause are vasomotor and genitourinary. Vasomotor symptoms ("hot flashes") cause daytime discomfort and chronic insomnia. A thin, dry vaginal lining and thin urethral mucosa can cause vaginal and vulvar irritation, pain during intercourse, and an increased risk for urinary tract infection.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2012 May 28;54(1391):41-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Once-Daily Gabapentin (Gralise) for Postherpetic Neuralgia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 28, 2011;  (Issue 1378)
A new once-daily formulation of gabapentin (Gralise – Depomed) has been approved by the FDA for treatment of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Immediate-release (IR) gabapentin (Neurontin, and others),...
A new once-daily formulation of gabapentin (Gralise – Depomed) has been approved by the FDA for treatment of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Immediate-release (IR) gabapentin (Neurontin, and others), which has been available in the US since 1994, is also approved for this indication, but is taken three times a day. Extended-release gabapentin enacarbil (Horizant) was recently approved by the FDA for treatment of restless legs syndrome.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Nov 28;53(1378):94 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Gabapentin Enacarbil (Horizant) for Restless Legs Syndrome

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 5, 2011;  (Issue 1372)
Gabapentin enacarbil (Horizant – GlaxoSmithKline), a new extended-release (ER) tablet formulation of gabapentin, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate-to-severe restless legs...
Gabapentin enacarbil (Horizant – GlaxoSmithKline), a new extended-release (ER) tablet formulation of gabapentin, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate-to-severe restless legs syndrome (RLS). The immediate-release (IR) formulation of gabapentin (Neurontin,and others), which is approved for treatment of epilepsy and postherpetic neuralgia, has been used for many years to treat RLS. Another ER tablet formulation of gabapentin (Gralise) has been approved by the FDA for treatment of postherpetic neuralgia.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Sep 5;53(1372):70-1 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Capsaicin Patch (Qutenza) for Postherpetic Neuralgia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 30, 2011;  (Issue 1365)
The FDA has approved a topical 8% patch formulation of capsaicin (Qutenza – NeurogesX), available only by prescription, for local treatment of postherpetic neuralgia. Postherpetic neuralgia occurs after...
The FDA has approved a topical 8% patch formulation of capsaicin (Qutenza – NeurogesX), available only by prescription, for local treatment of postherpetic neuralgia. Postherpetic neuralgia occurs after herpes zoster in about one third of patients ≥60 years old and can persist for months or even years.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 May 30;53(1365):42-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Migraine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 1, 2011;  (Issue 102)
Drugs for treatment of migraine are listed in Table 2 on page 9. Drugs for prevention of migraine are listed in Table 3 on page 10. Treatment of migraine in the emergency room, which may involve use of...
Drugs for treatment of migraine are listed in Table 2 on page 9. Drugs for prevention of migraine are listed in Table 3 on page 10. Treatment of migraine in the emergency room, which may involve use of intravenous drugs, is not included here.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2011 Feb;9(102):7-12 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2010;  (Issue 92)
Pain can be acute or chronic. Chronic pain has been broadly classified into two types: nociceptive and neuropathic. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less...
Pain can be acute or chronic. Chronic pain has been broadly classified into two types: nociceptive and neuropathic. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less responsive to opioids; adjuvant medicines such as antidepressants and anticonvulsants are often used to treat neuropathic pain. Combining different types of analgesics may provide an additive analgesic effect without increasing adverse effects.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2010 Apr;8(92):25-34 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Vigabatrin (Sabril) for Epilepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 22, 2010;  (Issue 1332)
The FDA has approved vigabatrin (vye gá ba trin; Sabril – Lundbeck) for oral use as add-on therapy for complex partial seizures in adults who are refractory to several antiepileptic drugs and as monotherapy...
The FDA has approved vigabatrin (vye gá ba trin; Sabril – Lundbeck) for oral use as add-on therapy for complex partial seizures in adults who are refractory to several antiepileptic drugs and as monotherapy for infantile spasms. Vigabatrin has been available in other countries for many years. Because of its potential for retinal toxicity, it will be available in the US only through a restricted distribution program called SHARE (Support, Help and Resources for Epilepsy). Prescribers and pharmacists distributing the drug must register, and patients must undergo visual field testing.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2010 Feb 22;52(1332):14-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Lacosamide for Epilepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 29, 2009;  (Issue 1315)
The FDA has approved lacosamide (Vimpat - UCB Pharma) for oral or intravenous (IV) use as add-on therapy in adults with partial-onset...
The FDA has approved lacosamide (Vimpat - UCB Pharma) for oral or intravenous (IV) use as add-on therapy in adults with partial-onset seizures.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Jun 29;51(1315):50-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs That May Cause Psychiatric Symptoms

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 15, 2008;  (Issue 1301)
Many drugs can cause psychiatric symptoms, but a causal connection is often difficult to establish. Psychiatric symptoms that emerge during drug treatment could also be due to the underlying illness, previously...
Many drugs can cause psychiatric symptoms, but a causal connection is often difficult to establish. Psychiatric symptoms that emerge during drug treatment could also be due to the underlying illness, previously unrecognized psychopathology, or psychosocial factors. The withdrawal of some drugs can cause symptoms such as anxiety, psychosis, delirium, agitation or depression.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Dec 15;50(1301):100-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Epilepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 2008;  (Issue 70)
Treatment of epilepsy should begin with a single drug, increasing the dosage gradually until seizures are controlled or adverse effects become unacceptable. If seizures continue and further dosage increases...
Treatment of epilepsy should begin with a single drug, increasing the dosage gradually until seizures are controlled or adverse effects become unacceptable. If seizures continue and further dosage increases appear inadvisable because of adverse effects, most Medical Letter consultants generally prescribe at least one and sometimes a second alternative drug as monotherapy before considering use of two drugs at the same time. Most antiepileptic drugs initially approved by the FDA only as adjunctive therapy for partial seizures may also be effective for other types of seizures and as monotherapy. Studies suggest that when used for the appropriate seizure type, antiepileptic drugs are roughly equivalent in efficacy. The choice of a drug is usually based on factors such as ease of use, adverse effects and cost.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2008 Jun;6(70):37-46 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Migraine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 1, 2008;  (Issue 67)
Some drugs for treatment of migraine attacks are listed in table 2 on page 18. Drugs for prevention of migraine are listed in table 3 on page 20. Treatment of migraine in the emergency room, which may involve...
Some drugs for treatment of migraine attacks are listed in table 2 on page 18. Drugs for prevention of migraine are listed in table 3 on page 20. Treatment of migraine in the emergency room, which may involve use of intravenous drugs, is not included here.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2008 Mar;6(67):17-22 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Pregabalin (Lyrica) for Fibromyalgia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 24, 2007;  (Issue 1270)
Pregabalin (Lyrica - Pfizer) is the first drug approved by the FDA for management of fibromyalgia. When it was first marketed, pregabalin, which is structurally similar to gabapentin (Neurontin, and others),...
Pregabalin (Lyrica - Pfizer) is the first drug approved by the FDA for management of fibromyalgia. When it was first marketed, pregabalin, which is structurally similar to gabapentin (Neurontin, and others), was approved for treatment of neuropathic pain associated with postherpetic neuralgia and diabetic peripheral neuropathy and for adjunctive treatment of partial onset seizures in adults with epilepsy. It has also been prescribed off-label for other types of neuropathic pain such as sciatica.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2007 Sep 24;49(1270):77-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Epilepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 1, 2005;  (Issue 39)
Treatment of epilepsy should begin with a single drug, increasing the dosage gradually until seizures are controlled or adverse effects become unacceptable. If seizures continue and further dosage increases...
Treatment of epilepsy should begin with a single drug, increasing the dosage gradually until seizures are controlled or adverse effects become unacceptable. If seizures continue and further dosage increases appear inadvisable because of adverse effects, most Medical Letter consultants generally prescribe at least one and sometimes a second alternative drug as monotherapy before considering use of two drugs at the same time. Most antiepileptic drugs initially approved by the FDA only as adjunctive therapy for partial seizures may also be effective for other types of seizures and as monotherapy.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2005 Nov;3(39):75-82 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Pregabalin (Lyrica) for Neuropathic Pain and Epilepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 12, 2005;  (Issue 1217)
Pregabalin (Lyrica - Pfizer), a structural analog of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) similar to gabapentin (Neurontin - Pfizer, and others), which recently became available generically, has been approved by the...
Pregabalin (Lyrica - Pfizer), a structural analog of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) similar to gabapentin (Neurontin - Pfizer, and others), which recently became available generically, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of neuropathic pain associated with postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), and for adjunctive treatment of partial onset seizures in adults with epilepsy.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Sep 12;47(1217):75-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Duloxetine (Cymbalta) for Diabetic Neuropathic Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 15, 2005;  (Issue 1215)
Duloxetine hydrochloride (Cymbalta - Lilly), a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) available for treatment of depression, has also been approved by the FDA for treatment of...
Duloxetine hydrochloride (Cymbalta - Lilly), a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) available for treatment of depression, has also been approved by the FDA for treatment of neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Duloxetine is one of two drugs approved specifically for management of neuropathic pain due to diabetes; the other, pregabalin (Lyrica - Pfizer), will be marketed soon and will be reviewed in the next issue of The Medical Letter.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Aug 15;47(1215):67-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Ropinirole for Restless Legs Syndrome

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 1, 2005;  (Issue 1214)
Ropinirole (Requip - GlaxoSmithKline), a dopamine agonist already available for treatment of Parkinson's disease, is now the first drug approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate to severe restless legs...
Ropinirole (Requip - GlaxoSmithKline), a dopamine agonist already available for treatment of Parkinson's disease, is now the first drug approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate to severe restless legs syndrome (RLS).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Aug 1;47(1214):62-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Treatment of Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 6, 2004;  (Issue 1197)
Estrogen is the most effective treatment for menopausal vasomotor symptoms (hot flashes), but the Women's Health Initiative study found that women who took estrogen plus a progestin for more than 5 years were...
Estrogen is the most effective treatment for menopausal vasomotor symptoms (hot flashes), but the Women's Health Initiative study found that women who took estrogen plus a progestin for more than 5 years were at increased risk for myocardial infarction, stroke, pulmonary emboli, deep vein thrombosis, breast cancer, and possibly dementia. Are there effective alternatives?
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Dec 6;46(1197):98-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Migraine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2004;  (Issue 25)
Drugs for treatment of migraine attacks are listed in the table on page 64. All of the oral drugs are most effective if taken early in an attack when the pain is mild (H Christoph-Diener et al, Neurology 2004;...
Drugs for treatment of migraine attacks are listed in the table on page 64. All of the oral drugs are most effective if taken early in an attack when the pain is mild (H Christoph-Diener et al, Neurology 2004; 63:520). Drugs for prevention of migraine are listed in the table on page 65. Treatment of migraine in the emergency room, which may involve use of intravenous drugs, is not included here.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2004 Sep;2(25):63-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Gabapentin (Neurontin) for Chronic Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 12, 2004;  (Issue 1180)
Gabapentin (Neurontin - Pfizer), which has been available in the US since 1994, is approved by the FDA only for treatment of partial epilepsy and postherpetic neuralgia, but is widely used off-label for a...
Gabapentin (Neurontin - Pfizer), which has been available in the US since 1994, is approved by the FDA only for treatment of partial epilepsy and postherpetic neuralgia, but is widely used off-label for a number of other indications, especially neuropathic pain syndromes. According to one report, among Medicaid recipients in Florida receiving gabapentin, 71% of prescriptions were for chronic pain and 8% for seizures and neuralgia ("The Pink Sheet" February 2, 2004; 66:30).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Apr 12;46(1180):29-31 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Psychiatric Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2003;  (Issue 11)
The number of drugs marketed for psychiatric indications has increased sharply in recent years. The recommendations in this article are based on the results of controlled trials and on the experience and...
The number of drugs marketed for psychiatric indications has increased sharply in recent years. The recommendations in this article are based on the results of controlled trials and on the experience and opinions of Medical Letter consultants. Interactions with other drugs can be found in The Medical Letter Handbook of Adverse Drug Interactions, 2003.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2003 Jul;1(11):69-76 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Epilepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 1, 2003;  (Issue 9)
Treatment of epilepsy should begin with a single drug, increasing the dosage gradually until seizures are controlled or adverse effects become unacceptable. If seizures continue and further dosage increases...
Treatment of epilepsy should begin with a single drug, increasing the dosage gradually until seizures are controlled or adverse effects become unacceptable. If seizures continue and further dosage increases appear inadvisable because of adverse effects, most Medical Letter consultants generally prescribe at least one and sometimes a second alternative drug as monotherapy before considering use of two drugs at the same time. Most antiepileptic drugs initially approved by the FDA only for adjunctive therapy are probably also effective as monotherapy. Many of the drugs used to treat epilepsy interact with each other (see table beginning on page 63) and with other drugs; for interactions with other drugs, see The Medical Letter Handbook of Adverse Drug Interactions, 2003. The treatment of status epilepticus is not included here.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2003 May;1(9):57-64 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Valproate and Other Anticonvulsants For Psychiatric Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 11, 2000;  (Issue 1094)
Anticonvulsants are now widely used for treatment of psychiatric illnesses, particularly bipolar disorder. Lithium is the standard drug for treatment of bipolar disorder, but it can cause severe toxicity, serum...
Anticonvulsants are now widely used for treatment of psychiatric illnesses, particularly bipolar disorder. Lithium is the standard drug for treatment of bipolar disorder, but it can cause severe toxicity, serum concentrations must be monitored, and it is not effective in some patients.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 Dec 11;42(1094):114-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Zonisamide (Zonegran) For Epilepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 2, 2000;  (Issue 1089)
Zonisamide (Zonegran - Elan Pharma), a sulfonamide chemically unrelated to other antiepileptic drugs, has been approved by the FDA for adjunctive use in adults with partial seizures. Zonisamide has been...
Zonisamide (Zonegran - Elan Pharma), a sulfonamide chemically unrelated to other antiepileptic drugs, has been approved by the FDA for adjunctive use in adults with partial seizures. Zonisamide has been available in Japan for more than 10 years.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 Oct 2;42(1089):94-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Two New Drugs for Epilepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 17, 2000;  (Issue 1076)
Oxcarbazepine, which is chemically similar to carbamazepine, and levetiracetam, a pyrrolidine acetamide chemically unrelated to other antiepileptic drugs, are the sixth and seventh drugs approved by the US Food...
Oxcarbazepine, which is chemically similar to carbamazepine, and levetiracetam, a pyrrolidine acetamide chemically unrelated to other antiepileptic drugs, are the sixth and seventh drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in the last five years for oral use in partial seizures.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 Apr 17;42(1076):33-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 14, 1998;  (Issue 1033)
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: first, non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, some drugs not usually...
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: first, non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, some drugs not usually thought of as analgesics, which act as adjuvants when given with NSAIDs or opioids, or have analgesic activity of their own in some types of pain.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1998 Aug 14;40(1033):79-84 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Topiramate for Epilepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 23, 1997;  (Issue 1001)
Topiramate (Topamax - Ortho-McNeil) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for oral use as an adjunct to other drugs in adult patients with partial seizures. Since this diagnostic...
Topiramate (Topamax - Ortho-McNeil) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for oral use as an adjunct to other drugs in adult patients with partial seizures. Since this diagnostic category includes the largest number of patients with refractory epilepsy, new drugs with antiepileptic activity are usually tried first for this indication. Topiramate (toe pyre' a mate) is a structurally unique agent chemically related to the D-enantiomer of fructose.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1997 May 23;39(1001):51-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Lamotrigine For Epilepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 17, 1995;  (Issue 944)
Lamotrigine (la mo tri jeen; Lamictal - Burroughs Wellcome), a phenyltriazine derivative, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in addition to other antiepileptic drugs in adults...
Lamotrigine (la mo tri jeen; Lamictal - Burroughs Wellcome), a phenyltriazine derivative, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in addition to other antiepileptic drugs in adults with partial seizures. Since this diagnostic category includes the largest number of patients with intractable epilepsy, new drugs with antiepileptic activity are usually tried first for this indication. Lamotrigine was first marketed abroad in 1990 and is now available in more than 50 other countries.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1995 Mar 17;37(944):21-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction