Matching articles for "Azithromycin"

Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 27, 2022;  (Issue 1653)
This article includes recommendations for management of most sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV and viral hepatitis. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been...
This article includes recommendations for management of most sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV and viral hepatitis. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA (see Table 1).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Jun 27;64(1653):97-104 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Acute Otitis Media in Children

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 7, 2022;  (Issue 1643)
More antibiotics are prescribed for treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) than for any other infection in young children. Children with AOM typically present with otalgia, fever, and bulging and erythema of...
More antibiotics are prescribed for treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) than for any other infection in young children. Children with AOM typically present with otalgia, fever, and bulging and erythema of the tympanic membrane.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Feb 7;64(1643):22-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: New Recommendations for Gonococcal Infection

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 3, 2021;  (Issue 1623)
The CDC has issued new recommendations for treatment of gonococcal infection. A single 500-mg IM dose (1000 mg in patients weighing ≥150 kg) of the third-generation cephalosporin ceftriaxone is now...
The CDC has issued new recommendations for treatment of gonococcal infection. A single 500-mg IM dose (1000 mg in patients weighing ≥150 kg) of the third-generation cephalosporin ceftriaxone is now the treatment of choice for patients with uncomplicated urogenital, rectal, or pharyngeal gonorrhea.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 May 3;63(1623):72 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antibacterial Drugs for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 25, 2021;  (Issue 1616)
Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is usually empiric, with selected antibiotic regimens directed against some of the most common causative pathogens. Recommended empiric regimens are listed in...
Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is usually empiric, with selected antibiotic regimens directed against some of the most common causative pathogens. Recommended empiric regimens are listed in Table 2; recommended antibiotic dosages for treatment of CAP are listed in Tables 3 and 4. Joint guidelines for treatment of CAP by the American Thoracic Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (ATS/IDSA) were updated in 2019.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Jan 25;63(1616):10-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Metoclopramide Nasal Spray (Gimoti) for Diabetic Gastroparesis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 11, 2021;  (Issue 1615)
The FDA has approved Gimoti (Evoke), a nasal spray formulation of the dopamine-2 (D2) receptor antagonist metoclopramide, for relief of symptoms in adults with acute and recurrent diabetic...
The FDA has approved Gimoti (Evoke), a nasal spray formulation of the dopamine-2 (D2) receptor antagonist metoclopramide, for relief of symptoms in adults with acute and recurrent diabetic gastroparesis. Metoclopramide (Reglan, and generics) has been available for years in conventional and orally-disintegrating tablets and in an injectable formulation. It is the only drug that is FDA-approved for treatment of diabetic gastroparesis.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Jan 11;63(1615):5-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Minocycline Foam (Zilxi) for Rosacea

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 16, 2020;  (Issue 1611)
The FDA has approved a 1.5% topical foam formulation of minocycline (Zilxi – Foamix) for treatment of inflammatory lesions of rosacea in adults. It is the only topical minocycline product approved...
The FDA has approved a 1.5% topical foam formulation of minocycline (Zilxi – Foamix) for treatment of inflammatory lesions of rosacea in adults. It is the only topical minocycline product approved for this indication. The same manufacturer markets minocycline foam 4% (Amzeeq) for treatment of acne in patients ≥9 years old.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Nov 16;62(1611):179-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for COPD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 7, 2020;  (Issue 1606)
The main goals of treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are to relieve symptoms, reduce the frequency and severity of exacerbations, and prevent disease progression. Several...
The main goals of treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are to relieve symptoms, reduce the frequency and severity of exacerbations, and prevent disease progression. Several guidelines and review articles on COPD treatment have been published in recent years. Treatment of acute exacerbations is not discussed here.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Sep 7;62(1606):137-44 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Some Drugs for COVID-19

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1595)
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in...
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in treating it. Definitive answers are lacking, but some recommendations can be made. For additional information on specific drugs, see our table Some Drugs Being Considered for Treatment of COVID-19.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1595):49-50 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Table: Treatments Considered for COVID-19 (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1595)
...
View the Table: Treatments Considered for COVID-19
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1595):e1-289 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Some Drugs for COVID-19

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1919)
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in...
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in treating it. Definitive answers are lacking, but some recommendations can be made. For additional information on specific drugs, see our table Some Drugs Being Considered for Treatment of COVID-19.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1919):1 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Common Eye Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 2, 2019;  (Issue 1586)
This issue includes reviews of drugs for glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), bacterial conjunctivitis, and dry eye disease. Allergic conjunctivitis is reviewed in a separate...
This issue includes reviews of drugs for glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), bacterial conjunctivitis, and dry eye disease. Allergic conjunctivitis is reviewed in a separate issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Dec 2;61(1586):187-94 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 7, 2019;  (Issue 1582)
Patients who receive pretravel advice can reduce their risk for many travel-related conditions. Vaccines recommended for travelers are reviewed in a separate...
Patients who receive pretravel advice can reduce their risk for many travel-related conditions. Vaccines recommended for travelers are reviewed in a separate issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Oct 7;61(1582):153-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Expanded Table: Antibiotics for Travelers' Diarrhea (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 7, 2019;  (Issue 1582)
...
View the Expanded Table: Antibiotics for Travelers' Diarrhea
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Oct 7;61(1582):e160 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Lefamulin (Xenleta) for Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 23, 2019;  (Issue 1581)
Lefamulin (Xenleta – Nabriva), a semisynthetic pleuromutilin antibiotic, has been approved by the FDA for IV and oral treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) in adults. It is the...
Lefamulin (Xenleta – Nabriva), a semisynthetic pleuromutilin antibiotic, has been approved by the FDA for IV and oral treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) in adults. It is the first systemic pleuromutilin antibiotic to be approved in the US; retapamulin (Altabax), a 1% topical ointment for treatment of impetigo, was approved in 2007.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Sep 23;61(1581):145-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Rifamycin (Aemcolo) for Treatment of Travelers' Diarrhea

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 11, 2019;  (Issue 1567)
The FDA has approved rifamycin (Aemcolo – Cosmo/ Aries), a minimally absorbed oral antibiotic, for treatment of adults with travelers' diarrhea (TD) caused by noninvasive strains of Escherichia coli....
The FDA has approved rifamycin (Aemcolo – Cosmo/ Aries), a minimally absorbed oral antibiotic, for treatment of adults with travelers' diarrhea (TD) caused by noninvasive strains of Escherichia coli. It is not recommended for treatment of diarrhea that is complicated by fever and/or bloody stools. Topical and injectable formulations of rifamycin have been used in Europe for other indications for many years.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Mar 11;61(1567):39-40 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Common Bacterial Infections in Adults

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 23, 2017;  (Issue 1532)
Bacterial infections in adults are generally treated empirically, with the antibiotic covering most, but not all, of the potential causative pathogens. For some infections, culture and sensitivity testing...
Bacterial infections in adults are generally treated empirically, with the antibiotic covering most, but not all, of the potential causative pathogens. For some infections, culture and sensitivity testing can guide treatment, allowing for use of narrower-spectrum antibiotics. The recommended dosages and durations of antibiotic treatment for common respiratory, skin, and urinary tract infections are listed in Tables 1-3. Infectious disease experts now recommend shorter treatment durations for many infections to reduce the development of antimicrobial resistance and minimize adverse effects.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Oct 23;59(1532):171-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Asthma

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 28, 2017;  (Issue 1528)
The goal of asthma treatment is to control symptoms and prevent exacerbations. Management of acute exacerbations of asthma is not discussed...
The goal of asthma treatment is to control symptoms and prevent exacerbations. Management of acute exacerbations of asthma is not discussed here.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Aug 28;59(1528):139-46 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 3, 2017;  (Issue 1524)
The text and tables that follow include recommendations for management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV and viral hepatitis. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have...
The text and tables that follow include recommendations for management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV and viral hepatitis. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Jul 3;59(1524):105-12 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for COPD

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 10, 2017;  (Issue 1518)
The main goals of treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are to relieve symptoms, reduce the frequency and severity of exacerbations, and prevent disease progression. Updated...
The main goals of treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are to relieve symptoms, reduce the frequency and severity of exacerbations, and prevent disease progression. Updated guidelines for treatment of COPD have been published in recent years.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Apr 10;59(1518):57-62 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Alternatives to Fluoroquinolones

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 6, 2016;  (Issue 1496)
The FDA has announced that it is requiring changes in the labeling of systemic fluoroquinolones to warn that the risk of serious adverse effects, including tendinitis, peripheral neuropathy and CNS effects,...
The FDA has announced that it is requiring changes in the labeling of systemic fluoroquinolones to warn that the risk of serious adverse effects, including tendinitis, peripheral neuropathy and CNS effects, generally outweighs their benefit for the treatment of acute sinusitis, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, and uncomplicated urinary tract infections. For these infections, the new labels will recommend reserving fluoroquinolones for patients with no other treatment options.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Jun 6;58(1496):75-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Treatment of Lyme Disease

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 9, 2016;  (Issue 1494)
Most cases of Lyme disease in the US occur between May and September in the Northeastern, Mid-Atlantic, and North Central...
Most cases of Lyme disease in the US occur between May and September in the Northeastern, Mid-Atlantic, and North Central states.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 May 9;58(1494):57-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 13, 2015;  (Issue 1466)
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask for information about prevention of diarrhea, malaria, and other travel-related conditions. Vaccines recommended for travelers based on their...
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask for information about prevention of diarrhea, malaria, and other travel-related conditions. Vaccines recommended for travelers based on their destination, length of stay, and planned activities were reviewed in a previous issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Apr 13;57(1466):52-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Tobramycin Inhalation Solution (Bethkis) for Cystic Fibrosis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 23, 2014;  (Issue 1445)
The FDA has approved another solution of the aminoglycoside antibiotic tobramycin (Bethkis – Chiesi/Cornerstone) for oral inhalation via a nebulizer for management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients...
The FDA has approved another solution of the aminoglycoside antibiotic tobramycin (Bethkis – Chiesi/Cornerstone) for oral inhalation via a nebulizer for management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Jun 23;56(1445):51-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2013;  (Issue 133)
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow include recommendations for management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis,...
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow include recommendations for management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis, and enteric infections. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Sep;11(133):87-94 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Bacterial Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2013;  (Issue 131)
The text that follows reviews some common bacterial infections and their empiric treatment pending the results of culture and susceptibility testing. The recommendations made here are based on the results...
The text that follows reviews some common bacterial infections and their empiric treatment pending the results of culture and susceptibility testing. The recommendations made here are based on the results of susceptibility studies, clinical trials, and the opinions of Medical Letter reviewers. Tables 1 and 2 list the usual dosages of antibacterial drugs.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Jul;11(131):65-74 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: FDA Azithromycin Warning

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2013;  (Issue 1413)
The FDA has announced that it is requiring changes in the labeling of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (Zithromax, Zmax) to warn about the risk of QT prolongation and cardiac arrhythmias.1 The new warnings...
The FDA has announced that it is requiring changes in the labeling of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (Zithromax, Zmax) to warn about the risk of QT prolongation and cardiac arrhythmias.1 The new warnings are based on a retrospective study in The New England Journal of Medicine (reviewed previously in The Medical Letter2), which found that among patients who received 347,795 prescriptions for azithromycin, there were 29 cardiovascular deaths, a significantly higher rate than the 42 that occurred among patients who received 1,348,672 prescriptions for amoxicillin (which does not prolong the QT interval) or the 41 that occurred among 1,391,180 patients who took no antibiotics. The risk with azithromycin was much higher in patients with cardiovascular risk factors.3

Other macrolides and fluoroquinolones can also prolong the QT interval. In the retrospective study, the risk of cardiovascular death with levofloxacin was not significantly different from the risk with azithromycin. As with any retrospective study, the possibility that baseline differences between patients taking azithromycin and those taking other or no antimicrobials could have been responsible for the difference in cardiovascular outcomes cannot be entirely ruled out.

1. FDA Drug Safety Communication: Azithromycin (Zithromax or Zmax) and the risk of potentially fatal heart rhythms. Available at www.fda.gov/drugs/drugsafety/ucm341822.htm. Accessed March 14, 2013.

2. In brief: safety of azithromycin. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2012; 54:45.

3. WA Ray et al. Azithromycin and the risk of cardiovascular death. N Engl J Med 2012; 366:1881.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2013 Apr 1;55(1413):28 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Some Common Eye Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 1, 2012;  (Issue 123)
Drugs for glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, bacterial conjunctivitis, and dry eyes are reviewed here. Drugs for the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis will be reviewed in a future issue...
Drugs for glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, bacterial conjunctivitis, and dry eyes are reviewed here. Drugs for the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis will be reviewed in a future issue of Treatment Guidelines on Drugs for Allergic Disorders.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2012 Nov;10(123):79-86 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Safety of Azithromycin

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 11, 2012;  (Issue 1392)
Recently published results of a large, carefully conducted retrospective study indicated that use of the antibiotic azithromycin (Zithromax, and others) may increase the risk of cardiovascular death, especially...
Recently published results of a large, carefully conducted retrospective study indicated that use of the antibiotic azithromycin (Zithromax, and others) may increase the risk of cardiovascular death, especially in patients with a high baseline risk of cardiovascular disease.1 One possible mechanism is prolongation of the QT interval, which is known to occur rarely with azithromycin and more frequently with the other macrolide antibiotics erythromycin (Erythrocin, and others) and clarithromycin (Biaxin, and others).

Among the patients who received 347,795 prescriptions for azithromycin, there were 29 cardiovascular deaths, a significantly higher rate than the 42 that occurred among the patients who received 1,348,672 prescriptions for amoxicillin (which does not prolong the QT interval) or the 41 that occurred among the 1,391,180 patients who took no antibiotics. Among patients with the highest baseline risk of cardiovascular disease, treatment with azithromycin, compared to amoxicillin, would have resulted in 245 additional cardiovascular deaths per million courses of the antibiotic.

As with any retrospective study, there could have been some undetected differences between the patients who received one drug or the other, but use of an appropriate non-macrolide alternative2 instead of azithromycin might be reasonable in patients with cardiovascular disease or in those who are taking other drugs that can prolong the QT interval (www.azcert.org).

1. WA Ray et al. Azithromycin and the risk of cardiovascular death. N Engl J Med 2012; 366:1881.

2. Drugs for bacterial infections. Treat Guidel Med Lett 2010; 8:43.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2012 Jun 11;54(1392):45 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 2012;  (Issue 118)
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask for information about appropriate vaccines and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the Centers...
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask for information about appropriate vaccines and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at www.cdc.gov/travel. Guidelines are also available from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2012 Jun;10(118):45-56 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Ceftaroline Fosamil (Teflaro) - A New IV Cephalosporin

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 24, 2011;  (Issue 1356)
The FDA has approved ceftaroline fosamil (Teflaro – Forest), an intravenous (IV) cephalosporin, for treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections, including those caused by...
The FDA has approved ceftaroline fosamil (Teflaro – Forest), an intravenous (IV) cephalosporin, for treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections, including those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and for treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in adults. It is the first beta-lactam antibiotic approved for treatment of MRSA.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Jan 24;53(1356):5-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2010;  (Issue 95)
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow are limited to management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis and enteric...
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow are limited to management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis and enteric infections. The drugs of choice, their dosages and alternatives are listed in a table that begins on page 54. A table listing the adverse effects of some of these antimicrobials begins on page 58.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2010 Jul;8(95):53-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Bacterial Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 2010;  (Issue 94)
The text below reviews some common bacterial infections and their treatment. The recommendations made here are based on the results of susceptibility studies, clinical trials and the opinions of Medical Letter...
The text below reviews some common bacterial infections and their treatment. The recommendations made here are based on the results of susceptibility studies, clinical trials and the opinions of Medical Letter consultants.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2010 Jun;8(94):43-52 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Some Common Eye Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 1, 2010;  (Issue 89)
Drugs for glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, bacterial conjunctivitis, and dry eyes are reviewed here. Ophthalmic drugs can have local and systemic adverse effects. In addition, for some elderly...
Drugs for glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, bacterial conjunctivitis, and dry eyes are reviewed here. Ophthalmic drugs can have local and systemic adverse effects. In addition, for some elderly patients, the complexity of self-administering numerous ophthalmic drugs may be the limiting factor in their ability to care for themselves. Drugs for the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis will be reviewed in a future issue of Treatment Guidelines on Drugs for Allergic Disorders.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2010 Jan;8(89):1-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Ophthalmic Besifloxacin (Besivance)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 14, 2009;  (Issue 1327)
The FDA has approved the fluoroquinolone besifloxacin 0.6% ophthalmic suspension (Besivance - Bausch & Lomb) for treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis caused by susceptible bacteria. According to the...
The FDA has approved the fluoroquinolone besifloxacin 0.6% ophthalmic suspension (Besivance - Bausch & Lomb) for treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis caused by susceptible bacteria. According to the manufacturer, this product was developed specifically for ophthalmic use in a specialized vehicle designed to prolong contact time on the ocular surface. Besifloxacin is not available for systemic use.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Dec 14;51(1327):101-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 1, 2009;  (Issue 87)
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for information about appropriate vaccines and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. Guidelines are also available from the Infectious Diseases...
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for information about appropriate vaccines and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. Guidelines are also available from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2009 Nov;7(87):83-94 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs That May Cause Psychiatric Symptoms

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 15, 2008;  (Issue 1301)
Many drugs can cause psychiatric symptoms, but a causal connection is often difficult to establish. Psychiatric symptoms that emerge during drug treatment could also be due to the underlying illness, previously...
Many drugs can cause psychiatric symptoms, but a causal connection is often difficult to establish. Psychiatric symptoms that emerge during drug treatment could also be due to the underlying illness, previously unrecognized psychopathology, or psychosocial factors. The withdrawal of some drugs can cause symptoms such as anxiety, psychosis, delirium, agitation or depression.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Dec 15;50(1301):100-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Travelers' Diarrhea

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 28, 2008;  (Issue 1291)
The most common cause of travelers' diarrhea, usually a self-limited illness without fever lasting several days, is infection with noninvasive enterotoxigenic (ETEC) or enteroaggregative (EAEC) strains of...
The most common cause of travelers' diarrhea, usually a self-limited illness without fever lasting several days, is infection with noninvasive enterotoxigenic (ETEC) or enteroaggregative (EAEC) strains of Escherichia coli. Campylobacter, Shigella, Salmonella, Aeromonas, viruses and parasites are less common.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Jul 28;50(1291):58-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Meningococcal Prophylaxis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 7, 2008;  (Issue 1283)
The CDC recently reported that fluoroquinoloneresistant strains of Neisseria meningitidis have been detected for the first time in the US in an area around the border of North Dakota and Minnesota (CDC. MMWR,...
The CDC recently reported that fluoroquinoloneresistant strains of Neisseria meningitidis have been detected for the first time in the US in an area around the border of North Dakota and Minnesota (CDC. MMWR, Feb 22, 2008). These isolates were all serogroup B, for which meningococcal vaccines (Med Lett Drugs Ther 2005; 47:29) do not offer protection. Since many laboratories do not test N. meningitidis for antimicrobial susceptibility, it is possible that such resistance is more widespread.

A single oral dose of ciprofloxacin (Cipro, and others) 500 mg has been used for prophylaxis after close contact with infected patients. Oral rifampin (Rifadin, and others) 600 mg (10 mg/kg for children) q12h for 2 days, a single IM injection of ceftriaxone (Rocephin, and others) 250 mg (125 mg for children), or a single oral dose of azithromycin (Zithromax, and others) 500 mg (10 mg/kg for children) are reasonable alternatives.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Apr 7;50(1283):25 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Ophthalmic Azithromycin (AzaSite)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 11, 2008;  (Issue 1279)
The FDA has approved azithromycin 1% ophthalmic solution (AzaSite - Inspire) for treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis in patients > 1 year old. It is formulated, according to the manufacturer, in a...
The FDA has approved azithromycin 1% ophthalmic solution (AzaSite - Inspire) for treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis in patients > 1 year old. It is formulated, according to the manufacturer, in a controlled-release delivery system that keeps the drug in the eye for several hours.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Feb 11;50(1279):11-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Correction: Major Changes in Endocarditis Prophylaxis for Dental, GI and GU Procedures

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 17, 2007;  (Issue 1276)
On page 100 of the article "Major Changes in Endocarditis Prophylaxis for Dental, GI and GU Procedures", under the section Highest-Risk Procedures, the word "rubber" should have been omitted. Placement of...
On page 100 of the article "Major Changes in Endocarditis Prophylaxis for Dental, GI and GU Procedures", under the section Highest-Risk Procedures, the word "rubber" should have been omitted. Placement of orthodontic rubber bands is not a highest-risk procedure that justifies prophylaxis; placement of orthodontic (metal) bands is. An orthodontic band is a metal ring that surrounds the tooth and is pressed into place causing movement in closely-spaced teeth and sometimes bleeding when the bands are placed close to the gumline.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2007 Dec 17;49(1276):104 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Major Changes in Endocarditis Prophylaxis for Dental, GI and GU Procedures

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 3, 2007;  (Issue 1275)
The American Heart Association has issued its revised guidelines for prevention of infective endocarditis. Antimicrobial prophylaxis for dental procedures is now recommended only for patients at the highest...
The American Heart Association has issued its revised guidelines for prevention of infective endocarditis. Antimicrobial prophylaxis for dental procedures is now recommended only for patients at the highest risk of severe consequences from endocarditis who are undergoing the highest-risk procedures. Endocarditis prophylaxis is no longer recommended for gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) procedures. When these changes are implemented, the number of patients receiving antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent endocarditis should decline sharply.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2007 Dec 3;49(1275):99-100 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2007;  (Issue 61)
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow are limited to management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis and enteric...
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow are limited to management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis and enteric infections. Guidelines are available from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with detailed recommendations for treatment of these diseases.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2007 Sep;5(61):81-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Choice of Antibacterial Drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 1, 2007;  (Issue 57)
Information about empirical treatment of bacterial infections, emerging trends in antimicrobial resistance, new drugs and new data about older drugs continue to become available. Usual pathogens and empiric...
Information about empirical treatment of bacterial infections, emerging trends in antimicrobial resistance, new drugs and new data about older drugs continue to become available. Usual pathogens and empiric treatment for some common types of infections are summarized in the text and a table listing the drugs of choice and alternatives for each pathogen begins on page 40. The recommendations made here are based on the results of susceptibility studies, clinical trials and the opinions of Medical Letter consultants.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2007 May;5(57):33-50 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Azithromycin Extended-Release (Zmax) for Sinusitis and Pneumonia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 28, 2005;  (Issue 1218)
Zmax (Pfizer), an extended-release oral suspension of azithromycin, has been approved by the FDA for single dose treatment of mild to moderate community acquired pneumonia (CAP) and acute bacterial sinusitis...

Zmax (Pfizer), an extended-release oral suspension of azithromycin, has been approved by the FDA for single dose treatment of mild to moderate community acquired pneumonia (CAP) and acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS) in adults. Immediate-release azithromycin will probably become available generically later this year when its patent expires.

Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Sep 28;47(1218):78-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antibacterial Prophylaxis for Dental, GI and GU Procedures

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 18, 2005;  (Issue 1213)
Many physicians believe that antimicrobial prophylaxis before procedures that may cause transient bacteremia can prevent endocarditis and prosthetic joint infection in patients at increased risk for these...
Many physicians believe that antimicrobial prophylaxis before procedures that may cause transient bacteremia can prevent endocarditis and prosthetic joint infection in patients at increased risk for these disorders. The effectiveness of this common practice has never been established by controlled trials in humans.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Jul 18;47(1213):59-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Treatment of Lyme Disease

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 23, 2005;  (Issue 1209)
Lyme disease in North America is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted to humans by Ixodes scapularis or pacificus ticks. These ticks may also carry other pathogens; coinfection...
Lyme disease in North America is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted to humans by Ixodes scapularis or pacificus ticks. These ticks may also carry other pathogens; coinfection with Babesia microti or Anaplasma phagocytophilum (formerly Ehrlichia) has been reported.1 In 2001 and 2002, 12 states (CT, DE, ME, MD, MA, MI, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, WI) reported about 95% of all the Lyme disease in the US, but cases occurred in all states except HI, MT and OK. Most Lyme disease in North America occurs between May and September.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 May 23;47(1209):41-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 1, 2004;  (Issue 26)
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow are limited to management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis and enteric...
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables that follow are limited to management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) other than HIV, viral hepatitis and enteric infections. Guidelines are available from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with detailed recommendations for treatment of these diseases (MMWR Recomm Rep 2002; 51, RR-6:1). New guidelines are expected soon.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2004 Oct;2(26):67-74 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Gemifloxacin (Factive)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 20, 2004;  (Issue 1192)
Gemifloxacin (Factive - Oscient), a new oral fluoroquinolone antibiotic, has been approved by the FDA for 5 days' treatment of acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (ABECB) and 7 days' treatment...
Gemifloxacin (Factive - Oscient), a new oral fluoroquinolone antibiotic, has been approved by the FDA for 5 days' treatment of acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (ABECB) and 7 days' treatment of mild to moderate community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults. For the next 6-8 months it will only be available, presumably for commercial reasons, in states east of the Rocky Mountains.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Sep 20;46(1192):78-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Rifaximin (Xifaxan) for Travelers' Diarrhea

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 13, 2004;  (Issue 1191)
Rifaximin (Xifaxan - Salix), a non-absorbed oral antibiotic derived from rifampin (Rifadin, and others), has been approved by the FDA for treatment of travelers' diarrhea caused by noninvasive strains of...
Rifaximin (Xifaxan - Salix), a non-absorbed oral antibiotic derived from rifampin (Rifadin, and others), has been approved by the FDA for treatment of travelers' diarrhea caused by noninvasive strains of Escherichia coli in patients 12 years of age or older. It has been available in Europe since 1987.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Sep 13;46(1191):74-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Telithromycin (Ketek) for Respiratory Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 16, 2004;  (Issue 1189)
Telithromycin (Ketek - Aventis) has been approved by the FDA for oral treatment of mild to moderate community-acquired pneumonia, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and acute bacterial sinusitis in...
Telithromycin (Ketek - Aventis) has been approved by the FDA for oral treatment of mild to moderate community-acquired pneumonia, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and acute bacterial sinusitis in patients age 18 and older. The drug is the first in a new class of antibiotics, the ketolides, derived from the macrolide erythromycin. Telithromycin has been marketed in Europe since 2001.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Aug 16;46(1189):66-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Parasitic Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 16, 2004;  (Issue 1189)
(Superseded by the 2007 version. Click here to purchase.)Parasitic infections are found throughout the world. With increasing travel, immigration, use of immunosuppressive drugs and the spread of AIDS,...
(Superseded by the 2007 version. Click here to purchase.)
Parasitic infections are found throughout the world. With increasing travel, immigration, use of immunosuppressive drugs and the spread of AIDS, physicians anywhere may see infections caused by previously unfamiliar parasites. The table below lists first-choice and alternative drugs for most parasitic infections. The brand names and manufacturers of the drugs are listed in this article
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Aug 16;46(1189):66 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 1, 2004;  (Issue 21)
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for advice about immunizations and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the Centers for...
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for advice about immunizations and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) at 877-FYI-TRIP (877-394-8747) or www.cdc.gov/travel. Recommendations for the treatment of parasitic diseases are available in the public reading room of The Medical Letter's web site.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2004 May;2(21):33-40 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Choice of Antibacterial Drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 1, 2004;  (Issue 19)
New drugs for bacterial infections and new information about older drugs continue to become available. Empirical treatment of some common bacterial infections is discussed in this article. A table listing the...
New drugs for bacterial infections and new information about older drugs continue to become available. Empirical treatment of some common bacterial infections is discussed in this article. A table listing the drugs of choice and alternatives for each pathogen begins on page 18. These recommendations are based on results of susceptibility studies, clinical trials and the opinions of Medical Letter consultants. Local resistance patterns should be taken into account. Trade names are listed on page 24.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2004 Mar;2(19):13-22 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pneumonia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2003;  (Issue 13)
The choice of drugs for treatment of pneumonia depends on the most likely pathogens causing the infection and local antimicrobial resistance patterns. Factors such as severity of illness, presence of co-morbid...
The choice of drugs for treatment of pneumonia depends on the most likely pathogens causing the infection and local antimicrobial resistance patterns. Factors such as severity of illness, presence of co-morbid conditions and whether the infection is community or hospital-acquired also need to be considered.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2003 Sep;1(13):83-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Augmentin XR

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 20, 2003;  (Issue 1148)
Augmentin XR (GlaxoSmithKline), an oral extended-release combination of amoxicillin and the beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid, is now being promoted for treatment of acute bacterial sinusitis and...
Augmentin XR (GlaxoSmithKline), an oral extended-release combination of amoxicillin and the beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid, is now being promoted for treatment of acute bacterial sinusitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Augmentin XR contains a higher dose of amoxicillin than Augmentin.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Jan 20;45(1148):5-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 15, 2002;  (Issue 1128)
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for advice about immunizations and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the CDC at...
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for advice about immunizations and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the CDC at 877-FYI-TRIP (877-394-8747) or www.cdc.gov/travel.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Apr 15;44(1128):33-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Parasitic Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2002;  (Issue 1127)
Superseded--purchase updated Parasitic Infections articleParasitic infections are found throughout the world. With increasing travel, immigration, use of immunosuppressive drugs and the spread of AIDS,...
Superseded--purchase updated Parasitic Infections article
Parasitic infections are found throughout the world. With increasing travel, immigration, use of immunosuppressive drugs and the spread of AIDS, physicians anywhere may see infections caused by previously unfamiliar parasites.

Note: Drugs for Parasitic Infections, revised and updated, is now available to both subscribers and nonsubscribers on our web site. This article, a bi-annual feature of The Medical Letter for many years, will not be published as a printed issue in 2002, but is included in the 16th edition of The Medical Letter Handbook of Antimicrobial Therapy. The handbook is now available and can be ordered by calling customer service at 1-800-211-2769.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Apr 1;44(1127):32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Treatment of Lyme Disease

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 1, 2000;  (Issue 1077)
Lyme disease is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted to humans by Ixodes ticks. These ticks may also carry other pathogens; co-transmission of Babesia and Ehrlichia species has been...
Lyme disease is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted to humans by Ixodes ticks. These ticks may also carry other pathogens; co-transmission of Babesia and Ehrlichia species has been reported.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 May 1;42(1077):37-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Gatifloxacin and Moxifloxacin: Two New Fluoroquinolones

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 21, 2000;  (Issue 1072)
Gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin are now available for once-daily treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia, acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, or acute...
Gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin are now available for once-daily treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia, acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, or acute sinusitis.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 Feb 21;42(1072):15-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 24, 1999;  (Issue 1062)
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables [in this article] are limited to treatment of non-HIV infections associated primarily with sexual...
Many infections can be transmitted during sexual contact. The text and tables [in this article] are limited to treatment of non-HIV infections associated primarily with sexual transmission.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1999 Sep 24;41(1062):85-90 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Three New Drugs for HIV Infection

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 4, 1998;  (Issue 1041)
Combination antiretroviral therapy including protease inhibitors has dramatically changed the treatment of HIV infection and the prognosis of those affected (Medical Letter Handbook of Antimicrobial Therapy,...
Combination antiretroviral therapy including protease inhibitors has dramatically changed the treatment of HIV infection and the prognosis of those affected (Medical Letter Handbook of Antimicrobial Therapy, 1998, page 122). Due to limitations and failures with these drugs in many patients, however, three new drugs, none of them protease inhibitors, have rapidly come into wide use in clinical trials or 'expanded access' programs. They are abacavir (Ziagen - Glaxo Wellcome), adefovir (Preveon - Gilead) and efavirenz (Sustiva - DuPont). Efavirenz was recently approved for treatment of adults and children by the FDA. Abacavir has been recommended for approval by an FDA advisory committee.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1998 Dec 4;40(1041):114-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Cefdinir--A New Oral Cephalosporin

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 28, 1998;  (Issue 1034)
Cefdinir (Omnicef - Parke-Davis), a third-generation oral cephalosporin, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of acute sinusitis, otitis media, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, pharyngitis,...
Cefdinir (Omnicef - Parke-Davis), a third-generation oral cephalosporin, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of acute sinusitis, otitis media, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, pharyngitis, community-acquired pneumonia and skin infections. Other drugs available for these indications are reviewed in The Medical Letter Handbook of Antimicrobial Therapy, 1998.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1998 Aug 28;40(1034):85-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Grepafloxacin--A New Fluoroquinolone

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 30, 1998;  (Issue 1019)
Grepafloxacin (Raxar - Glaxo Wellcome), a once-daily oral fluoroquinolone, is now being marketed for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, uncomplicated...
Grepafloxacin (Raxar - Glaxo Wellcome), a once-daily oral fluoroquinolone, is now being marketed for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, uncomplicated gonorrhea, and nongonococcal urethritis and cervicitis.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1998 Jan 30;40(1019):17-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Parasitic Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 2, 1998;  (Issue 1017)
(Superseded by the 2013 version. Click here to purchase.)Parasitic infections are found throughout the world. With increasing travel, immigration, use of immunosuppressive drugs and the spread of AIDS,...
(Superseded by the 2013 version. Click here to purchase.)
Parasitic infections are found throughout the world. With increasing travel, immigration, use of immunosuppressive drugs and the spread of AIDS, physicians anywhere may see infections caused by previously unfamiliar parasites. The table lists first-choice and alternative drugs for most parasitic infections.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1998 Jan 2;40(1017):1-12 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Treatment of Lyme Disease

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 9, 1997;  (Issue 1000)
Lyme disease, a multisystem infection transmitted by ixodid ticks and caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is the most common vector-borne illness in the USA. Cases have been reported in 44 states, and...
Lyme disease, a multisystem infection transmitted by ixodid ticks and caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is the most common vector-borne illness in the USA. Cases have been reported in 44 states, and also in Canada and many countries in Europe and Asia (ME Falagas and SL Gorbach, Infect Dis Clin Pract, 5:217, 1996).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1997 May 9;39(1000):47-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Sparfloxacin and Levofloxacin

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 25, 1997;  (Issue 999)
Sparfloxacin (Zagam - Rh ne-Poulenc Rorer) and levofloxacin (Levaquin - Ortho-McNeil) are the newest fluoroquinolone antimicrobials to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Sparfloxacin in a...
Sparfloxacin (Zagam - Rh ne-Poulenc Rorer) and levofloxacin (Levaquin - Ortho-McNeil) are the newest fluoroquinolone antimicrobials to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Sparfloxacin in a once-daily oral preparation is being marketed for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. Levofloxacin, which is the active stereoisomer of ofloxacin (Floxin), is available for either oral or parenteral use; it is approved for oncedaily treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, sinusitis, skin and skin structure infections and complicated urinary tract infections.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1997 Apr 25;39(999):41-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Ceftibuten - A New Oral Cephalosporin

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 15, 1996;  (Issue 970)
Ceftibuten (Cedax - Schering), an oral cephalosporin similar to cefixime (Suprax - Medical Letter, 31:73, 1989), has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of acute otitis...
Ceftibuten (Cedax - Schering), an oral cephalosporin similar to cefixime (Suprax - Medical Letter, 31:73, 1989), has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of acute otitis media, pharyngitis or tonsillitis, and for acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1996 Mar 15;38(970):23-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Dirithromycin

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 24, 1995;  (Issue 962)
Dirithromycin (Dynabac - manufactured by Lilly, distributed by Bock), an oral macrolide antibiotic chemically similar to erythromycin, clarithromycin (Biaxin) and azithromycin (Zithromax), has been approved...
Dirithromycin (Dynabac - manufactured by Lilly, distributed by Bock), an oral macrolide antibiotic chemically similar to erythromycin, clarithromycin (Biaxin) and azithromycin (Zithromax), has been approved for marketing by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1995 Nov 24;37(962):109-10 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for AIDS and Associated Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 13, 1995;  (Issue 959)
Results of recently completed clinical trials have led to some changes in recommendation for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other infections associated with...
Results of recently completed clinical trials have led to some changes in recommendation for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other infections associated with AIDS.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1995 Oct 13;37(959):87-94 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for AIDS and Associated infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 3, 1993;  (Issue 904)
Results of recently completed clinical trials have led to some changes in recommendations for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other infections associted with...
Results of recently completed clinical trials have led to some changes in recommendations for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other infections associted with AIDS.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1993 Sep 3;35(904):79-86 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Loracarbef

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 18, 1992;  (Issue 879)
Loracarbef (Lorabid - Lilly), a new beta-lactam antibiotic with antimicrobial activity similar to the second-generation cephalosporins, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment...
Loracarbef (Lorabid - Lilly), a new beta-lactam antibiotic with antimicrobial activity similar to the second-generation cephalosporins, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of respiratory, skin, and urinary tract infection caused by susceptible organisms in both adults and children. It will probably compete with drugs such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, and others), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (Augmentin), cefaclor (Ceclor), cefuroxime axetil (Ceftin), and cefprozil (Cefzil - Medical Letter, 34:63, 1992).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1992 Sep 18;34(879):87-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Clarithromycin and Azithromycin

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 15, 1992;  (Issue 870)
Clarithromycin (Biaxin - Abbott) and azithromycin (Zithromax - Pfizer), two macrolide antibiotics chemically related to erythromycin, have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of...
Clarithromycin (Biaxin - Abbott) and azithromycin (Zithromax - Pfizer), two macrolide antibiotics chemically related to erythromycin, have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of respiratory, skin, and skin structure infections. Azithromycin has also been approved for treatment of nongonococcal urethritis and cervicitis caused by Chlamydia trachomatis.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1992 May 15;34(870):45-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs For AIDS And Associated Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 18, 1991;  (Issue 855)
A growing number of clinical trials now permits some consensus on the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other infections associated with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in...
A growing number of clinical trials now permits some consensus on the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other infections associated with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in adults.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1991 Oct 18;33(855):95-102 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction