Matching articles for "Ibuprofen"

Comparison Table: H2-Receptor Antagonists and PPIs (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 4, 2022;  (Issue 1647)
...
View the Comparison Table: H2-Receptor Antagonists and PPIs
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Apr 4;64(1647):e56-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Nonopioid Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 7, 2022;  (Issue 1645)
Nonopioid drugs can be used in the treatment of many nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. For severe pain, especially severe chronic cancer pain, use of opioids may be necessary....
Nonopioid drugs can be used in the treatment of many nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. For severe pain, especially severe chronic cancer pain, use of opioids may be necessary. Noninvasive nonpharmacologic treatments, including physical and psychological therapies, have been shown to improve pain and function in patients with some common chronic pain conditions and are unlikely to cause serious harms. A multimodal approach to analgesic therapy can increase pain control while reducing opioid use and adverse effects.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Mar 7;64(1645):33-40 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Table: Some Nonopioid Analgesics for Pain (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 7, 2022;  (Issue 1645)
...
View the Comparison Table: Some Nonopioid Analgesics for Pain
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Mar 7;64(1645):e40-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Acute Otitis Media in Children

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 7, 2022;  (Issue 1643)
More antibiotics are prescribed for treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) than for any other infection in young children. Children with AOM typically present with otalgia, fever, and bulging and erythema of...
More antibiotics are prescribed for treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) than for any other infection in young children. Children with AOM typically present with otalgia, fever, and bulging and erythema of the tympanic membrane.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Feb 7;64(1643):22-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Migraine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 5, 2020;  (Issue 1608)
An oral nonopioid analgesic is often sufficient for acute treatment of mild to moderate migraine headache without severe nausea or vomiting. A triptan is the drug of choice for treatment of moderate to...
An oral nonopioid analgesic is often sufficient for acute treatment of mild to moderate migraine headache without severe nausea or vomiting. A triptan is the drug of choice for treatment of moderate to severe migraine headache pain in most patients without vascular disease. Early treatment of pain when it is still mild to moderate in intensity improves headache response and reduces the risk of recurrence.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Oct 5;62(1608):153-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

IV Meloxicam (Anjeso) for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 29, 2020;  (Issue 1601)
The FDA has approved Anjeso (Baudax Bio), an IV formulation of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) meloxicam, for once-daily treatment of moderate to severe pain in adults. Oral...
The FDA has approved Anjeso (Baudax Bio), an IV formulation of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) meloxicam, for once-daily treatment of moderate to severe pain in adults. Oral meloxicam (Mobic, and others), which is only indicated for treatment of chronic pain associated with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, has been available for 20 years. IV formulations of ketorolac, ibuprofen (Caldolor), and acetaminophen (Ofirmev) are also available for treatment of pain.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Jun 29;62(1601):100-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Osteoarthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 20, 2020;  (Issue 1596)
Many different drugs are used for treatment of osteoarthritis pain, but none of them prevent progression of the disease. Nonpharmacologic approaches including weight management, exercise, tai chi, physical...
Many different drugs are used for treatment of osteoarthritis pain, but none of them prevent progression of the disease. Nonpharmacologic approaches including weight management, exercise, tai chi, physical therapy, assistive devices, and total joint arthroplasty can also be used. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has published new guidelines for the management of osteoarthritis of the hip, hand, and knee.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 20;62(1596):57-62 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Some Drugs for COVID-19

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1595)
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in...
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in treating it. Definitive answers are lacking, but some recommendations can be made. For additional information on specific drugs, see our table Some Drugs Being Considered for Treatment of COVID-19.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1595):49-50 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Table: Treatments Considered for COVID-19 (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1595)
...
View the Table: Treatments Considered for COVID-19
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1595):e1-289 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Some Drugs for COVID-19

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1919)
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in...
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in treating it. Definitive answers are lacking, but some recommendations can be made. For additional information on specific drugs, see our table Some Drugs Being Considered for Treatment of COVID-19.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1919):1 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 7, 2019;  (Issue 1582)
Patients who receive pretravel advice can reduce their risk for many travel-related conditions. Vaccines recommended for travelers are reviewed in a separate...
Patients who receive pretravel advice can reduce their risk for many travel-related conditions. Vaccines recommended for travelers are reviewed in a separate issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Oct 7;61(1582):153-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Expanded Table: Some Drugs for Altitude Illness, Jet Lag, and Motion Sickness (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 7, 2019;  (Issue 1582)
...
View the Expanded Table: Some Drugs for Altitude Illness, Jet Lag, and Motion Sickness
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Oct 7;61(1582):e161-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Benzhydrocodone/Acetaminophen (Apadaz) for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 15, 2019;  (Issue 1576)
The FDA has approved Apadaz (KemPharm), a short-acting, fixed-dose combination of benzhydrocodone and acetaminophen, for short-term management (≤14 days) of acute pain severe enough to require an opioid...
The FDA has approved Apadaz (KemPharm), a short-acting, fixed-dose combination of benzhydrocodone and acetaminophen, for short-term management (≤14 days) of acute pain severe enough to require an opioid and for which alternative treatment options are inadequate. Benzhydrocodone is a prodrug of hydrocodone. Fixed-dose combinations of short-acting hydrocodone and acetaminophen or ibuprofen have been available for years and are the most abused opioid products in the US. Apadaz was developed under the presumption that inclusion of the inactive prodrug would reduce the potential for abuse of the combination by non-oral routes such as smoking, snorting, or injection, but the FDA did not approve Apadaz as an abuse-deterrent formulation.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Jul 15;61(1576):110-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Gout

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 11, 2019;  (Issue 1567)
Drugs for gout reduce the pain and inflammation of acute flares and lower serum urate levels in order to prevent recurrent flares, development of tophi, and joint...
Drugs for gout reduce the pain and inflammation of acute flares and lower serum urate levels in order to prevent recurrent flares, development of tophi, and joint damage.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Mar 11;61(1567):33-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Expanded Table: Some Drugs for Gout (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 11, 2019;  (Issue 1567)
...
View the Expanded Table: Some Drugs for Gout
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Mar 11;61(1567):e40-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Nonopioid Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 12, 2018;  (Issue 1540)
Nonopioid drugs can be used in the treatment of many nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. Use of opioids for pain will be reviewed in a future...
Nonopioid drugs can be used in the treatment of many nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. Use of opioids for pain will be reviewed in a future issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Feb 12;60(1540):24-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Table: Some Nonopioid Analgesics for Pain (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 12, 2018;  (Issue 1540)
...
View the Comparison Table: Some Nonopioid Analgesics for Pain
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Feb 12;60(1540):e32-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Table: Drugs for GERD and Peptic Ulcer Disease (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 15, 2018;  (Issue 1538)
...
View the Comparison Table: Drugs for GERD and Peptic Ulcer Disease
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Jan 15;60(1538):e16-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Migraine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 13, 2017;  (Issue 1514)
An oral nonopioid analgesic may be sufficient for treatment of mild to moderate migraine without severe nausea or vomiting. A triptan is the drug of choice for treatment of moderate to severe migraine. Use...
An oral nonopioid analgesic may be sufficient for treatment of mild to moderate migraine without severe nausea or vomiting. A triptan is the drug of choice for treatment of moderate to severe migraine. Use of a triptan early in an attack when pain is still mild to moderate in intensity improves headache response and reduces recurrence rates.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Feb 13;59(1514):27-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Celecoxib Safety Revisited

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 19, 2016;  (Issue 1510)
The results of a clinical trial (PRECISION) comparing the cardiovascular safety of the COX-2 selective NSAID celecoxib (Celebrex, and generics) with that of ibuprofen and naproxen, which are...
The results of a clinical trial (PRECISION) comparing the cardiovascular safety of the COX-2 selective NSAID celecoxib (Celebrex, and generics) with that of ibuprofen and naproxen, which are nonselective, have been described in the lay press in terms that may overestimate the safety of celecoxib.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Dec 19;58(1510):159 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Intravenous Diclofenac (Dyloject)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 21, 2015;  (Issue 1484)
The FDA has approved Dyloject (Hospira), an IV formulation of the NSAID diclofenac sodium, for use in adults. It can be administered alone for treatment of mild to moderate pain or in combination with...
The FDA has approved Dyloject (Hospira), an IV formulation of the NSAID diclofenac sodium, for use in adults. It can be administered alone for treatment of mild to moderate pain or in combination with opioid analgesics for moderate to severe pain. Dyloject is the first injectable formulation of diclofenac to become available in the US.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Dec 21;57(1484):171-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Extended-Release Hydrocodone (Hysingla ER) for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 11, 2015;  (Issue 1468)
The FDA has approved a second extended-release (ER) formulation of the oral opioid agonist hydrocodone (Hysingla ER – Purdue) for management of pain severe enough to require continuous long-term therapy...
The FDA has approved a second extended-release (ER) formulation of the oral opioid agonist hydrocodone (Hysingla ER – Purdue) for management of pain severe enough to require continuous long-term therapy and for which alternative treatment options are inadequate. Hysingla ER tablets have abuse-deterrent properties to discourage their misuse.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 May 11;57(1468):71-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Rescheduling of Hydrocodone Combination Products

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 13, 2014;  (Issue 1453)
The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has reclassified all hydrocodone combination products as schedule II controlled substances; they were previously classified as schedule III. Hydrocodone alone...
The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has reclassified all hydrocodone combination products as schedule II controlled substances; they were previously classified as schedule III. Hydrocodone alone (Zohydro ER) is already a schedule II controlled substance.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Oct 13;56(1453):101-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Osteoarthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2014;  (Issue 1450)
Many different drugs are used for treatment of osteoarthritis pain, but none of them prevent progression of the disease. Many nonpharmacologic approaches are available as well, including weight...
Many different drugs are used for treatment of osteoarthritis pain, but none of them prevent progression of the disease. Many nonpharmacologic approaches are available as well, including weight management, exercise, physical therapy, assistive devices, and total joint arthroplasty. New guidelines for the management of osteoarthritis have recently been published.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Sep 1;56(1450):80-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Extended-Release Oxycodone and Acetaminophen (Xartemis XR)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 21, 2014;  (Issue 1447)
The FDA has approved a fixed-dose extended-release formulation of oxycodone and acetaminophen (Xartemis XR – Mallinckrodt) for oral treatment of acute pain severe enough to require an opioid. Oxycodone is...
The FDA has approved a fixed-dose extended-release formulation of oxycodone and acetaminophen (Xartemis XR – Mallinckrodt) for oral treatment of acute pain severe enough to require an opioid. Oxycodone is available in the US as a single entity in oral immediate-release (Oxecta, and others) and extendedrelease (OxyContin) formulations. Immediate-release oxycodone is also available in combination with aspirin (Percodan, and others), acetaminophen (Percocet, and others), or ibuprofen (see Table 1).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Jul 21;56(1447):59-61 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Generic Celecoxib

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 21, 2014;  (Issue 1447)
The FDA has authorized two manufacturers (Teva, Mylan) to market generic formulations of celecoxib (Celebrex – Pfizer), the only COX-2 selective inhibitor remaining on the US market. Celecoxib is less likely...
The FDA has authorized two manufacturers (Teva, Mylan) to market generic formulations of celecoxib (Celebrex – Pfizer), the only COX-2 selective inhibitor remaining on the US market. Celecoxib is less likely than nonselective NSAIDs to cause gastric ulcers or other GI toxicity,1 and unlike traditional NSAIDs, it does not have an antiplatelet effect.

Celecoxib is much less COX-2 selective than rofecoxib (Vioxx), which was removed from the US market because of an increased risk of cardiovascular events. One analysis of randomized clinical trials that included a total of about 26,000 patients taking celecoxib found no evidence of an increased risk of cardiovascular thrombotic events compared to nonselective NSAIDs or placebo.2 A review of controlled observational studies found an increased cardiovascular risk with celecoxib (RR 1.17) that was similar to the risk with ibuprofen (RR 1.18) and slightly higher than the risk with naproxen (RR 1.09).3 All NSAIDs can cause renal toxicity, especially in the elderly.4

  1. PL McCormack. Celecoxib: a review of its use for symptomatic relief in the treatment of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. Drugs 2011; 71:2457.
  2. WB White et al. Risk of cardiovascular events in patients receiving celecoxib: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. Am J Cardiol 2007; 99:91.
  3. P McGettigan and D Henry. Cardiovascular risk with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: systematic review of population-based controlled observational studies. PLoS Med 2011; 8:e1001098.
  4. RL Barkin et al. Should nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) be prescribed to the older adult? Drugs Aging 2010; 27:775.


Download complete U.S. English article

Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Jul 21;56(1447):59 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Extended-Release Hydrocodone (Zohydro ER) for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 9, 2014;  (Issue 1444)
The FDA has approved an extended-release oral formulation of the opioid agonist hydrocodone (Zohydro ER – Zogenix) for management of pain severe enough to require continuous, long-term therapy and for...
The FDA has approved an extended-release oral formulation of the opioid agonist hydrocodone (Zohydro ER – Zogenix) for management of pain severe enough to require continuous, long-term therapy and for which alternative treatment options are inadequate. Zohydro ER is the first single-ingredient hydrocodone product to be marketed in the US. Hydrocodone has been available for years in combination with acetaminophen (Vicodin, and others) or ibuprofen (Vicoprofen, and others).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Jun 9;56(1444):45 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Migraine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 1, 2013;  (Issue 136)
Treatment of migraine in the emergency department, which may involve use of intravenous drugs, is not discussed...
Treatment of migraine in the emergency department, which may involve use of intravenous drugs, is not discussed here.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Dec;11(136):107-12 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2013;  (Issue 128)
Pain can be acute or chronic. The two major types of chronic pain are nociceptive pain and neuropathic pain. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less...
Pain can be acute or chronic. The two major types of chronic pain are nociceptive pain and neuropathic pain. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less responsive to opioids and is often treated with adjuvant drugs such as antidepressants and antiepileptics. Combining different types of analgesics may provide an additive analgesic effect without increasing adverse effects.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Apr;11(128):31-42 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 1, 2012;  (Issue 117)
Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are now used early in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to achieve clinical remission, prevent irreversible damage to joints, and minimize...
Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are now used early in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to achieve clinical remission, prevent irreversible damage to joints, and minimize toxicity associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids. DMARDs (Table 1) generally do not have an immediate analgesic effect, but over time can control symptoms and have been shown to delay and possibly stop progression of the disease. NSAIDs have immediate analgesic and antiinflammatory effects, but may not affect the disease process. Oral corticosteroids can relieve joint symptoms and control systemic manifestations, but their chronic use can cause many complications. Judicious use of intra-articular corticosteroids can rapidly decrease inflammation in acute joints with few, if any, adverse effects.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2012 May;10(117):37-44 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

A Fixed-Dose Combination of Ibuprofen and Famotidine (Duexis)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 31, 2011;  (Issue 1376)
The FDA has approved Duexis (Horizon), a fixed-dose combination of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ibuprofen and the H2-receptor antagonist (H2RA) famotidine, for symptomatic relief of...
The FDA has approved Duexis (Horizon), a fixed-dose combination of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ibuprofen and the H2-receptor antagonist (H2RA) famotidine, for symptomatic relief of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis and to decrease the risk of developing gastric and duodenal ulcers in patients at risk for NSAID-associated ulcers. Vimovo, a combination of the NSAID naproxen and the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) esomeprazole, is also approved by the FDA for prevention of NSAID-associated gastric ulcers.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Oct 31;53(1376):85-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Migraine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 1, 2011;  (Issue 102)
Drugs for treatment of migraine are listed in Table 2 on page 9. Drugs for prevention of migraine are listed in Table 3 on page 10. Treatment of migraine in the emergency room, which may involve use of...
Drugs for treatment of migraine are listed in Table 2 on page 9. Drugs for prevention of migraine are listed in Table 3 on page 10. Treatment of migraine in the emergency room, which may involve use of intravenous drugs, is not included here.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2011 Feb;9(102):7-12 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Propoxyphene Toxicity

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 6, 2010;  (Issue 1346)
The FDA has required manufacturers of propoxyphene-containing products (Darvon, and others) to strengthen boxed warnings to include the potential for overdose.1 This action followed disclosure of fatal...
The FDA has required manufacturers of propoxyphene-containing products (Darvon, and others) to strengthen boxed warnings to include the potential for overdose.1 This action followed disclosure of fatal overdoses linked to propoxyphene-containing products taken alone or concurrently with other CNS depressants, including alcohol. Many of the overdoses occurred in patients with a history of emotional instability or suicide attempts. Accumulation of metabolites of propoxyphene can lead to central nervous system, cardiac and respiratory depression; convulsions and cardiotoxicity have occurred.

A Schedule IV controlled substance, propoxyphene is a weak full agonist opioid indicated for relief of mild to moderate pain.2 It is often prescribed in combination with acetaminophen (Darvocet, and others). One reasonable alternative would be codeine with acetaminophen; 32 mg of codeine has an analgesic effect similar to that of 65 mg of propoxyphene. Another would be 400 mg of ibuprofen, which may be more effective than either propoxyphene or codeine combined with acetaminophen.

1. FDA News Release. FDA takes actions on Darvon, other pain medications containing propoxyphene. Available at www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm170769.html. Accessed August 23, 2010.

2. Drugs for pain. Treat Guidel Med Lett 2010; 92:25.

Download: U.S. English
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2010 Sep 6;52(1346):69 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2010;  (Issue 92)
Pain can be acute or chronic. Chronic pain has been broadly classified into two types: nociceptive and neuropathic. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less...
Pain can be acute or chronic. Chronic pain has been broadly classified into two types: nociceptive and neuropathic. Nociceptive pain can be treated with nonopioid analgesics or opioids. Neuropathic pain is less responsive to opioids; adjuvant medicines such as antidepressants and anticonvulsants are often used to treat neuropathic pain. Combining different types of analgesics may provide an additive analgesic effect without increasing adverse effects.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2010 Apr;8(92):25-34 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Colchicine and Other Drugs for Gout

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 30, 2009;  (Issue 1326)
Until the recent introduction of febuxostat (Uloric), no new drugs had been marketed for treatment of gout in the past 40 years. Colchicine, which has been available for decades as an unapproved drug, has now...
Until the recent introduction of febuxostat (Uloric), no new drugs had been marketed for treatment of gout in the past 40 years. Colchicine, which has been available for decades as an unapproved drug, has now been approved by the FDA (Colcrys) for treatment and prophylaxis of gout flares. It was approved earlier only in combination with probenecid (Colbenemid, and others). The goals of gout treatment are three-fold: treating acute disease, preventing flares and reducing uric acid stores.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Nov 30;51(1326):93-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 1, 2009;  (Issue 81)
Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are now used early in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to prevent irreversible damage to joints and minimize toxicities associated with nonsteroidal...
Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are now used early in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to prevent irreversible damage to joints and minimize toxicities associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2009 May;7(81):37-46 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

A Fixed-Dose Combination of Sumatriptan and Naproxen for Migraine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 16, 2008;  (Issue 1288)
The FDA has approved an oral, fixed-dose combination (Treximet - GlaxoSmithKline) of the selective serotonin receptor agonist ("triptan") sumatriptan (Imitrex) and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug...
The FDA has approved an oral, fixed-dose combination (Treximet - GlaxoSmithKline) of the selective serotonin receptor agonist ("triptan") sumatriptan (Imitrex) and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) naproxen sodium (Anaprox, and others) for acute treatment of migraine attacks.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Jun 16;50(1288):45-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Migraine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 1, 2008;  (Issue 67)
Some drugs for treatment of migraine attacks are listed in table 2 on page 18. Drugs for prevention of migraine are listed in table 3 on page 20. Treatment of migraine in the emergency room, which may involve...
Some drugs for treatment of migraine attacks are listed in table 2 on page 18. Drugs for prevention of migraine are listed in table 3 on page 20. Treatment of migraine in the emergency room, which may involve use of intravenous drugs, is not included here.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2008 Mar;6(67):17-22 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

A Diclofenac Patch (Flector) for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 14, 2008;  (Issue 1277)
Diclofenac epolamine patch 1.3% (Flector Patch - Alpharma), a topical formulation of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac, has been approved by the FDA for topical treatment of acute pain...
Diclofenac epolamine patch 1.3% (Flector Patch - Alpharma), a topical formulation of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac, has been approved by the FDA for topical treatment of acute pain due to minor strains, sprains and contusions. It is the first topical NSAID patch approved in the US. A diclofenac patch has been used in Europe since 1993. Diclofenac sodium (Voltaren, and others) is available in the US as an oral tablet, in a 1% gel for treatment of osteoarthritis (to be reviewed in a future issue), in a 3% gel (Solaraze) for treatment of actinic keratoses, and in an ophthalmic formulation.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Jan 14;50(1277):1-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2007;  (Issue 56)
Pain can be acute or chronic. Chronic pain has been broadly classified into two types: nociceptive and neuropathic. Nociceptive pain is generally treated with nonopioid analgesics and opioids. Antidepressants...
Pain can be acute or chronic. Chronic pain has been broadly classified into two types: nociceptive and neuropathic. Nociceptive pain is generally treated with nonopioid analgesics and opioids. Antidepressants and anticonvulsants have been used to treat neuropathic pain. Combining two different types of analgesics may nprovide an additive analgesic effect without increasing adverse effects.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2007 Apr;5(56):23-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

A Combination of Oxycodone and Ibuprofen (Combunox) for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 2, 2006;  (Issue 1225)
A fixed-dose combination of oxycodone 5 mg and ibuprofen 400 mg (Combunox - Forest Laboratories) is now available and is being heavily advertised for short-term treatment of moderate to severe acute...
A fixed-dose combination of oxycodone 5 mg and ibuprofen 400 mg (Combunox - Forest Laboratories) is now available and is being heavily advertised for short-term treatment of moderate to severe acute pain.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2006 Jan 2;48(1225):3-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 1, 2005;  (Issue 40)
To prevent irreversible damage to joints and minimize toxicities associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids, disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are now used...
To prevent irreversible damage to joints and minimize toxicities associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids, disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are now used early in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The DMARDs listed in the table on page 84 have no immediate analgesic effects, but can control symptoms and have been shown to delay and possibly stop progression of the disease. The NSAIDs listed in the table on page 88 have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, but may not affect the disease process. Oral corticosteroids can rapidly relieve joint symptoms and control systemic manifestations, but their chronic use is associated with many complications.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2005 Dec;3(40):83-90 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

COX-2 Alternatives and GI Protection

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 8, 2004;  (Issue 1195)
With the removal of Vioxx from the market and concerns about cardiovascular toxicity with other selective COX-2 inhibitors, patients are looking for safe alternatives, and manufacturers of other drugs are...
With the removal of Vioxx from the market and concerns about cardiovascular toxicity with other selective COX-2 inhibitors, patients are looking for safe alternatives, and manufacturers of other drugs are looking for additional market share. The COX-2 inhibitors first became popular because they have less upper GI toxicity than older less selective NSAIDs, at least in the short term, in patients not taking aspirin.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Nov 8;46(1195):91-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

What About Celebrex?

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 25, 2004;  (Issue 1194)
Rofecoxib (Vioxx - Merck) has been withdrawn from the market due to an increased risk of cardiovascular complications associated with its long-term use. The question remains whether all selective COX-2...
Rofecoxib (Vioxx - Merck) has been withdrawn from the market due to an increased risk of cardiovascular complications associated with its long-term use. The question remains whether all selective COX-2 inhibitors carry the same risk. Full-page advertisements in newspapers for celecoxib (Celebrex - Pfizer), the most widely used COX-2 inhibitor, assure the public that it does not.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Oct 25;46(1194):87-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Migraine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 2004;  (Issue 25)
Drugs for treatment of migraine attacks are listed in the table on page 64. All of the oral drugs are most effective if taken early in an attack when the pain is mild (H Christoph-Diener et al, Neurology 2004;...
Drugs for treatment of migraine attacks are listed in the table on page 64. All of the oral drugs are most effective if taken early in an attack when the pain is mild (H Christoph-Diener et al, Neurology 2004; 63:520). Drugs for prevention of migraine are listed in the table on page 65. Treatment of migraine in the emergency room, which may involve use of intravenous drugs, is not included here.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2004 Sep;2(25):63-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Do NSAIDs Interfere with the Cardioprotective Effects of Aspirin?

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 2, 2004;  (Issue 1188)
Low-dose aspirin is widely used as an antiplatelet drug to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (Medical Letter 2000; 42:18). Recent reports suggest that the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)...
Low-dose aspirin is widely used as an antiplatelet drug to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (Medical Letter 2000; 42:18). Recent reports suggest that the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ibuprofen (Motrin, and others) may decrease the efficacy of aspirin for this indication. The manufacturer of Tylenol is capitalizing on these reports by advertising that aspirin-taking patients who need pain relief should use acetaminophen instead of ibuprofen.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Aug 2;46(1188):61-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2004;  (Issue 23)
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; opioids; and adjuvant drugs that are not usually thought of...
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; opioids; and adjuvant drugs that are not usually thought of as analgesics, such as antidepressants, which can act as adjuvants when given with NSAIDs or opioids, or have analgesic activity of their own in some types of pain. Combining two different types of analgesics may provide an additive analgesic effect without necessarily increasing adverse effects.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2004 Jul;2(23):47-54 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Prevention and Treatment of Sunburn

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 7, 2004;  (Issue 1184)
Solar ultraviolet (UV) light capable of injuring the skin is classified by wavelength into UVA I (340-400 nm), UVA II (320-340 nm) and UVB (290-320 nm). UVB is responsible for most of the erythema of sunburn....
Solar ultraviolet (UV) light capable of injuring the skin is classified by wavelength into UVA I (340-400 nm), UVA II (320-340 nm) and UVB (290-320 nm). UVB is responsible for most of the erythema of sunburn. UVA has been implicated in the development of phototoxicity and photoaging. The FDA permits sunscreen manufacturers to claim broad-spectrum protection if their products block at least part of UVA II in addition to UVB.

Click here to view the free full article.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Jun 7;46(1184):45-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drug Interactions

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 8, 2003;  (Issue 1158)
Changes caused by one drug in the absorption, distribution, metabolism or excretion of another may lead to a pharmacokinetic adverse drug interaction (DN Juurlink et al, JAMA 2003; 289:1652). Additive drug...
Changes caused by one drug in the absorption, distribution, metabolism or excretion of another may lead to a pharmacokinetic adverse drug interaction (DN Juurlink et al, JAMA 2003; 289:1652). Additive drug interactions, such as vasodilation caused by both sildenafil (Viagra) and nitrates, can also have adverse effects.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Jun 8;45(1158):46-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 1, 2003;  (Issue 5)
Many different drugs are now used to treat rheumatoid arthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), listed in the table on page 26, have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, but may not affect...
Many different drugs are now used to treat rheumatoid arthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), listed in the table on page 26, have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, but may not affect the disease process. Corticosteroids can provide rapid relief of joint symptoms and control of systemic manifestations, but chronic use is associated with many complications. The "disease-modifying" anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), listed on page 29, have no immediate analgesic effects, but can control symptoms and may delay progression of the disease (American College of Rheumatology Subcommittee on Rheumatoid Arthritis Guidelines, Arthritis Rheum 2002; 46:328). Interactions of anti-rheumatic drugs with other drugs are listed in The Medical Letter Handbook of Adverse Drug Interactions, 2003.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2003 Jan;1(5):25-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Generic drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 14, 2002;  (Issue 1141)
When patents expire on brand-name drugs and generic formulations become available, patients and managed care organizations may express a preference for the lower-cost generics. Are they equivalent to the...
When patents expire on brand-name drugs and generic formulations become available, patients and managed care organizations may express a preference for the lower-cost generics. Are they equivalent to the brand-name product?
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Oct 14;44(1141):89-90 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Valdecoxib (Bextra) - a New Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 29, 2002;  (Issue 1129)
Valdecoxib (Bextra - Pharmacia/Pfizer), a selective cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitor similar to celecoxib (Celebrex) and rofecoxib (Vioxx), was recently approved by the FDA for treatment of osteoarthritis,...
Valdecoxib (Bextra - Pharmacia/Pfizer), a selective cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitor similar to celecoxib (Celebrex) and rofecoxib (Vioxx), was recently approved by the FDA for treatment of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and primary dysmenorrhea.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Apr 29;44(1129):39-41 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Cardiovascular Safety of Cox-2 Inhibitors

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 12, 2001;  (Issue 1118)
Related Articles Since Publication Increasing use of rofecoxib (Vioxx) and celecoxib (Celebrex), both selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), for treatment of arthristis has been accompanied by...

Related Articles Since Publication

Increasing use of rofecoxib (Vioxx) and celecoxib (Celebrex), both selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), for treatment of arthristis has been accompanied by concerns that they may increase risk of thrombotic cardiovascular events.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2001 Nov 12;43(1118):99-100 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 21, 2000;  (Issue 1085)
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: first, non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, drugs not usually thought...
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: first, non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, drugs not usually thought of as analgesics, which act as adjuvants when given with NSAIDs or opioids, or have analgesic activity of their own in some types of pain. Non-opioids can be given concurrently with opioids for an additive analgesic effect.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 Aug 21;42(1085):73-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs For Rheumatoid Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 10, 2000;  (Issue 1082)
Many different drugs are now used to treat rheumatoid arthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, but may not affect the disease process. The...
Many different drugs are now used to treat rheumatoid arthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, but may not affect the disease process. The "disease-modifying anti-rheumatic"drugs (DMARDs) have no immediate analgesic effects, but can control symptoms and may delay progression of the disease.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 Jul 10;42(1082):57-64 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Meloxicam (Mobic) for Osteoarthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 29, 2000;  (Issue 1079)
Meloxicam, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with some cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selectivity in vitro, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of...
Meloxicam, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with some cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selectivity in vitro, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of osteoarthritis.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 May 29;42(1079):47-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Rofecoxib for Osteoarthritis and Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 2, 1999;  (Issue 1056)
Rofecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of osteoarthritis, acute pain and menstrual...
Rofecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of osteoarthritis, acute pain and menstrual pain.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1999 Jul 2;41(1056):59-62 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drug Interactions

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 2, 1999;  (Issue 1056)
Reports of adverse interactions between drugs continue to accumulate. Recently, the FDA has expanded the recommendations on drug interactions found in the package inserts of new...
Reports of adverse interactions between drugs continue to accumulate. Recently, the FDA has expanded the recommendations on drug interactions found in the package inserts of new drugs.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1999 Jul 2;41(1056):59-62 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Celecoxib for Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 29, 1999;  (Issue 1045)
Celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid...
Celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1999 Jan 29;41(1045):11-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

New Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 20, 1998;  (Issue 1040)
Leflunomide (Arava - Hoechst Marion Roussel), which inhibits pyrimidine synthesis, and etanercept (Enbrel - Immunex/Wyeth-Ayerst), which blocks the action of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), have been approved by...
Leflunomide (Arava - Hoechst Marion Roussel), which inhibits pyrimidine synthesis, and etanercept (Enbrel - Immunex/Wyeth-Ayerst), which blocks the action of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), have been approved by the FDA for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. A third drug, infliximab (Remicade - Centocor), which also blocks TNF and has been used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, was approved earlier for treatment of Crohn's disease. Its use in Crohn's disease will be reviewed in a future issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1998 Nov 20;40(1040):110-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 14, 1998;  (Issue 1033)
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: first, non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, some drugs not usually...
Three types of analgesic drugs are available: first, non-opioids, including aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, some drugs not usually thought of as analgesics, which act as adjuvants when given with NSAIDs or opioids, or have analgesic activity of their own in some types of pain.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1998 Aug 14;40(1033):79-84 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Bromfenac for Analgesia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 10, 1997;  (Issue 1011)
Bromfenac sodium (Duract - Wyeth-Ayerst), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is being heavily advertised as an alternative to...
Bromfenac sodium (Duract - Wyeth-Ayerst), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is being heavily advertised as an alternative to narcotics for short-term treatment of pain.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1997 Oct 10;39(1011):93-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Glucosamine for Osteoarthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 26, 1997;  (Issue 1010)
The Medical Letter has received many inquiries about use of glucosamine, a basic constituent of articular cartilage glycosaminoglycans, for treatment of arthritis. A recently published book (The Arthritis...
The Medical Letter has received many inquiries about use of glucosamine, a basic constituent of articular cartilage glycosaminoglycans, for treatment of arthritis. A recently published book (The Arthritis Cure), several television news shows, and articles in The New York Times have suggested it may be effective for treatment of osteoarthritis. Glucosamine is sold as a 'dietary supplement' in the USA.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1997 Sep 26;39(1010):91-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Acetaminophen, Nsaids and Alcohol

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 21, 1996;  (Issue 977)
An advertising war between manufacturers of over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics has led some patients to ask their physicians about the safety of taking these products if they also drink...
An advertising war between manufacturers of over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics has led some patients to ask their physicians about the safety of taking these products if they also drink alcohol.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1996 Jun 21;38(977):55-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Oxaprozin for Arthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 19, 1993;  (Issue 890)
Oxaprozin (Daypro -Searle), a propionic acid-derivative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for once-daily treatment of rheumatoid arthritis...
Oxaprozin (Daypro -Searle), a propionic acid-derivative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for once-daily treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Some of the NSAIDs previously marketed in the USA are listed in the table on page 16. Ibuprofen, naproxen, fenoprofen, ketoprofen, and flurbiprofen are also propionic acid derivatives. Piroxicam and nabumetone (Medical Letter, 34:38, 1992) are also approved for once-daily use, and indomethacin is available in an extended-release formulation that can be taken once a day.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1993 Feb 19;35(890):15-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 8, 1993;  (Issue 887)
Three types of analgesic drugs are available in the USA: first, aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, drugs not usually thought of as...
Three types of analgesic drugs are available in the USA: first, aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen; second, opioids; and third, drugs not usually thought of as analgesics, which act as adjuvants when given with NSAIDs or opioids, or have analgesic activity of their own in some types of pain. (American Pain Society, Principles of analgesic Use, 3rd ed, Skokie, illinois: American pain society, 1992).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1993 Jan 8;35(887):1-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Nabumetone - A New Nsaid

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 17, 1992;  (Issue 868)
Nabumetone (Relafen - SmithKline Beecham), a new nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis....
Nabumetone (Relafen - SmithKline Beecham), a new nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The drug has been available in the United Kingdom since 1987. The manufacturer claims that nabumetone is as effective as other NSAIDs and causes a relatively low incidence of peptic ulcers.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1992 Apr 17;34(868):38-40 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs For Treatment Of Fungal Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 21, 1992;  (Issue 864)
The incidence of opportunistic fungal infections continues to increase, particularly in patients who have AIDS, are taking immunosuppressive drugs, or are in intensive care units. Intravenous (IV) amphotericin...
The incidence of opportunistic fungal infections continues to increase, particularly in patients who have AIDS, are taking immunosuppressive drugs, or are in intensive care units. Intravenous (IV) amphotericin B (Fungizone, and others), sometimes given with flucytosine (Ancobon), is the drug of choice for initial treatment of most rapidly progressive, acutely life-threatening fungal infections; for less severe infections, fluconazole (Diflucan, ketoconazole (Nizoral), or itraconazole (Sporanox - an investigational drug in the (USA) may also be effective, can be taken orally, and are much better tolerated. The treatment of superficial fungal infections is not discussed here.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1992 Feb 21;34(864):14-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Etodolac

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 23, 1991;  (Issue 851)
Etodolac (Lodine - Wyeth-Ayerst), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) available in Europe for several years, was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in osteoarthritis...
Etodolac (Lodine - Wyeth-Ayerst), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) available in Europe for several years, was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in osteoarthritis and as a general-purpose analgesic. It has not been approved for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1991 Aug 23;33(851):79-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs That Cause Pulmonary Toxicity

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 21, 1990;  (Issue 827)
Some commonly used systemic drugs that may cause pulmonary toxicity are listed in the table below. These adverse effects may sometimes be difficult to distinguish from the underlying disease (JAD Cooper, Jr...
Some commonly used systemic drugs that may cause pulmonary toxicity are listed in the table below. These adverse effects may sometimes be difficult to distinguish from the underlying disease (JAD Cooper, Jr et al, Am Rev Respir Dis, 133:321, 488, 1986). Pulmonary effects that are part of a generalized reaction or are indirect effects of drugs - on respiratory muscles, for example, or on the immune system - are not included here.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1990 Sep 21;32(827):88-90 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Ibuprofen vs. Acetaminophen in Children

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 15, 1989;  (Issue 807)
Since the implication of aspirin in Reye's syndrome, acetaminophen (Tylenol; and others) has become the standard drug for symptomatic treatment of fever and pain in children. Ibuprofen, a nonsteroidal...
Since the implication of aspirin in Reye's syndrome, acetaminophen (Tylenol; and others) has become the standard drug for symptomatic treatment of fever and pain in children. Ibuprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) available for many years in tables (Mortin; Advil; and others), has now become available in a suspension. The suspension will be sold by presecription for treatment of fever or arthritis in children.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1989 Dec 15;31(807):109-10 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Flurbiprofen

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 7, 1989;  (Issue 789)
Flurbiprofen (Ansaid - Upjohn), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) available in some countries since 1977, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of rheumatoid...
Flurbiprofen (Ansaid - Upjohn), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) available in some countries since 1977, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Flurbiprofen is a fluorinated phenylalkanoic acid derivative structurally related to ibuprofen (Motrin;and others).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1989 Apr 7;31(789):31-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Misoprostol

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 10, 1989;  (Issue 787)
Misoprostol (Cytotec - Searle), a synthetic methyl analog of prostaglandin E1, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for prevention of gastric ulcers in high-risk patients taking...
Misoprostol (Cytotec - Searle), a synthetic methyl analog of prostaglandin E1, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for prevention of gastric ulcers in high-risk patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In other countries, the drug is also marketed for treatment of idiopathic peptic ulcers unrelated to NSAIDs.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1989 Mar 10;31(787):21-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Diclofenac

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 2, 1988;  (Issue 780)
Diclofenac sodium (Voltaren - Geigy), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) available in some countries since 1974, was recently introduced in the USA for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis,...
Diclofenac sodium (Voltaren - Geigy), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) available in some countries since 1974, was recently introduced in the USA for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. It is being promoted as 'The number one prescribed antiarthritic in the world.'
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1988 Dec 2;30(780):109-11 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction