Matching articles for "Depression"

Lumateperone (Caplyta) for Bipolar Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 8, 2022;  (Issue 1656)
The oral second-generation antipsychotic drug lumateperone (Caplyta – Intra-Cellular Therapies), which was approved by the FDA in 2020 for treatment of schizophrenia, is now approved for use...
The oral second-generation antipsychotic drug lumateperone (Caplyta – Intra-Cellular Therapies), which was approved by the FDA in 2020 for treatment of schizophrenia, is now approved for use as monotherapy or as an adjunct to lithium or valproate for treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I or II disorder in adults.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Aug 8;64(1656):126-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Parkinson's Disease

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 22, 2021;  (Issue 1618)
The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are caused primarily by degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The nonmotor symptoms of the disease are thought to be caused by...
The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are caused primarily by degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The nonmotor symptoms of the disease are thought to be caused by degeneration of other neurotransmitter systems. No disease-modifying drugs are available for treatment of PD.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Feb 22;63(1618):25-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

A New Indication for Esketamine Nasal Spray (Spravato)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 21, 2020;  (Issue 1607)
Esketamine (Spravato – Janssen), an intranasal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist that was previously approved by the FDA for treatmentresistant depression,1 has now been approved...
Esketamine (Spravato – Janssen), an intranasal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist that was previously approved by the FDA for treatmentresistant depression,1 has now been approved for treatment of depressive symptoms in adults with major depressive disorder (MDD) and acute suicidal ideation or behavior. Esketamine is the S-enantiomer of the anesthetic ketamine (Ketalar, and generics). It is the first drug to be approved for this indication. Most clinical trials of antidepressants have excluded patients with acute suicidal ideation.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Sep 21;62(1607):151 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 24, 2020;  (Issue 1592)
Complete remission of symptoms is the goal of treatment for major depressive disorder; a partial response is associated with an increased risk of relapse. Improvement in symptoms can occur within the first...
Complete remission of symptoms is the goal of treatment for major depressive disorder; a partial response is associated with an increased risk of relapse. Improvement in symptoms can occur within the first two weeks of treatment with an antidepressant, but it may take 4-8 weeks to achieve a substantial benefit. Following successful treatment of a first major depressive episode, antidepressant treatment should be continued at the same dose for at least 4-9 months to consolidate recovery. In patients with recurrent depressive episodes, long-term maintenance treatment can reduce the risk of relapse.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Feb 24;62(1592):25-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Cannabis and Cannabinoids

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 18, 2019;  (Issue 1585)
Cannabis (marijuana) contains more than 60 pharmacologically active cannabinoids; delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are the best known. THC is the main psychoactive constituent of...
Cannabis (marijuana) contains more than 60 pharmacologically active cannabinoids; delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are the best known. THC is the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis. CBD, unlike THC, does not produce intoxication or euphoria.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Nov 18;61(1585):179-82 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Turmeric Supplements

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 18, 2019;  (Issue 1585)
Turmeric is a spice derived from the Curcuma longa plant. Dietary supplements and foods containing turmeric are widely promoted for relief of pain and to improve joint mobility, immunity,...
Turmeric is a spice derived from the Curcuma longa plant. Dietary supplements and foods containing turmeric are widely promoted for relief of pain and to improve joint mobility, immunity, digestion, cardiovascular health, depression, anxiety, memory, and cognition.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Nov 18;61(1585):185 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Brexanolone (Zulresso) for Postpartum Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 6, 2019;  (Issue 1571)
The FDA has approved the GABAA receptor modulator brexanolone (Zulresso – Sage Therapeutics) for IV treatment of postpartum depression (PPD). Brexanolone is the first drug to be approved by the FDA for...
The FDA has approved the GABAA receptor modulator brexanolone (Zulresso – Sage Therapeutics) for IV treatment of postpartum depression (PPD). Brexanolone is the first drug to be approved by the FDA for this indication.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 May 6;61(1571):68-70 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Esketamine Nasal Spray (Spravato) for Treatment-Resistant Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 8, 2019;  (Issue 1569)
The FDA has approved esketamine (Spravato – Janssen), an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, for intranasal treatment (in conjunction with an oral antidepressant) of adults with...
The FDA has approved esketamine (Spravato – Janssen), an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, for intranasal treatment (in conjunction with an oral antidepressant) of adults with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). This is the first FDA approval for esketamine, which is the S-enantiomer of the intravenous anesthetic ketamine (Ketalar, and generics). In recent years, IV ketamine has been increasingly used (off-label) for treatment of TRD.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Apr 8;61(1569):54-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Aripiprazole with Digital Ingestion Tracking (Abilify MyCite)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 28, 2019;  (Issue 1564)
Monitoring adherence of psychiatric patients to oral medication may be especially difficult. The FDA has approved Abilify MyCite (Otsuka/Proteus), an aripiprazole tablet with an embedded sensor that tracks...
Monitoring adherence of psychiatric patients to oral medication may be especially difficult. The FDA has approved Abilify MyCite (Otsuka/Proteus), an aripiprazole tablet with an embedded sensor that tracks when patients take the medication. It is indicated for treatment of adults with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder. Abilify MyCite is the first drug with a digital ingestion tracking system to be approved in the US.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Jan 28;61(1564):15-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Bipolar Disorder

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 15, 2016;  (Issue 1501)
Bipolar disorder is characterized by intermittent episodes of mania and/or depression. Even with maintenance treatment, recurrences of manic or (more frequently) depressive episodes are common. Some of the...
Bipolar disorder is characterized by intermittent episodes of mania and/or depression. Even with maintenance treatment, recurrences of manic or (more frequently) depressive episodes are common. Some of the drugs and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA for use in bipolar disorder.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Aug 15;58(1501):103-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 4, 2016;  (Issue 1498)
Complete remission of symptoms is the goal of antidepressant therapy; partial response is associated with an increased risk of relapse. Improvement can occur within the first two weeks of drug therapy, but...
Complete remission of symptoms is the goal of antidepressant therapy; partial response is associated with an increased risk of relapse. Improvement can occur within the first two weeks of drug therapy, but it may take 4-8 weeks to achieve a substantial benefit. Fewer than 50% of patients with depression respond to first-line pharmacotherapy, and the rate of response decreases with each subsequent drug trial. Following remission after a first episode of depression, many experts recommend continuing antidepressant treatment at the same dose for at least 6-12 months to consolidate recovery. For patients with recurrent depressive episodes, long-term maintenance therapy can reduce the risk of recurrence.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Jul 4;58(1498):85-90 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Brexpiprazole (Rexulti) for Schizophrenia and Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 17, 2015;  (Issue 1475)
The FDA has approved the oral, once-daily, second-generation antipsychotic brexpiprazole (Rexulti – Otsuka/Lundbeck) for treatment of schizophrenia and as an adjunct to antidepressants for treatment of...
The FDA has approved the oral, once-daily, second-generation antipsychotic brexpiprazole (Rexulti – Otsuka/Lundbeck) for treatment of schizophrenia and as an adjunct to antidepressants for treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). Aripiprazole (Abilify), a structurally similar second-generation antipsychotic also comarketed by Otsuka (with BMS), recently became available generically.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Aug 17;57(1475):116-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Khedezla - A New Brand of Desvenlafaxine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 6, 2014;  (Issue 1433)
The FDA has approved the marketing of another extended-release brand-name formulation of the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) desvenlafaxine (Khedezla – Par/Osmotica) for treatment of...
The FDA has approved the marketing of another extended-release brand-name formulation of the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) desvenlafaxine (Khedezla – Par/Osmotica) for treatment of depression. It is the third extended-release formulation of desvenlafaxine to become available in the US. Khedezla was approved using a 505(b)(2) application, a new drug application (NDA) that relies upon the FDA's findings of safety and/or effectiveness for a previously approved drug.

Khedezla does not appear to offer any advantage over the other extended-release formulations of desvenlafaxine. There is no evidence that any formulation of desvenlafaxine is more effective for treatment of depression than other SNRIs or any SSRI, which are available in less expensive generic formulations.1

1. Drugs for psychiatric disorders. Treat Guidel Med Lett 2013; 11:53.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Jan 6;56(1433):4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Vortioxetine (Trintellix) for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 25, 2013;  (Issue 1430)
The FDA has approved vortioxetine (vor" tye ox' e teen; Trintellix – Takeda/Lundbeck), a new serotonergic drug, for treatment of major depressive disorder. Like vilazodone (Viibryd), another serotonergic...
The FDA has approved vortioxetine (vor" tye ox' e teen; Trintellix – Takeda/Lundbeck), a new serotonergic drug, for treatment of major depressive disorder. Like vilazodone (Viibryd), another serotonergic antidepressant, it has been claimed to have a low incidence of sexual side effects and no significant effect on weight.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2013 Nov 25;55(1430):93-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Parkinson's Disease

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 1, 2013;  (Issue 135)
The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are caused primarily by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The non-motor symptoms of the disease are thought to be...
The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are caused primarily by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The non-motor symptoms of the disease are thought to be caused by degeneration of other neurotransmitter systems.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Nov;11(135):101-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Paroxetine (Brisdelle) for Hot Flashes

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 28, 2013;  (Issue 1428)
The FDA has approved a low-dose formulation of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine mesylate (Brisdelle – Noven Therapeutics) for treatment of moderate-to-severe vasomotor symptoms...
The FDA has approved a low-dose formulation of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine mesylate (Brisdelle – Noven Therapeutics) for treatment of moderate-to-severe vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause. It is the first non-hormonal therapy to be approved for this indication. Paroxetine mesylate (Pexeva) and paroxetine hydrochloride (Paxil, and generics) are marketed in higher doses for treatment of depression and other psychiatric disorders.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2013 Oct 28;55(1428):85-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Citalopram, Escitalopram and the QT Interval

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 22, 2013;  (Issue 1421)
In 2011, the FDA asked the manufacturers of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram (Celexa, and generics) to lower the maximum daily dosage of the drug because of a dose-related...
In 2011, the FDA asked the manufacturers of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram (Celexa, and generics) to lower the maximum daily dosage of the drug because of a dose-related increase in the QT interval. Since then, some of our readers have asked whether escitalopram (Lexapro, and generics), the active enantiomer of citalopram, could have the same effect.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2013 Jul 22;55(1421):59 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Psychiatric Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 2013;  (Issue 130)
Drugs are not the only treatment for psychiatric illness. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be used for many...
Drugs are not the only treatment for psychiatric illness. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be used for many of them as well. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has a long history of efficacy and safety when drugs are ineffective or cannot be used.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Jun;11(130):53-64 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Budeprion XL 300 Has Been Withdrawn

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 29, 2012;  (Issue 1402)
The FDA has asked Impax Laboratories/Teva Pharmaceuticals to stop production and distribution of Budeprion XL 300 mg, a generic extended-release formulation of the antidepressant bupropion (Wellbutrin XL),...
The FDA has asked Impax Laboratories/Teva Pharmaceuticals to stop production and distribution of Budeprion XL 300 mg, a generic extended-release formulation of the antidepressant bupropion (Wellbutrin XL), because it has found that Budeprion XL 300 mg releases bupropion more rapidly than Wellbutrin XL 300 mg, the original brand name product. Patients switched from the brand name to the generic formulation have complained for years that the generic was less effective and caused more side effects than the original formulation. In 2007, ConsumerLab.com, an independent laboratory, conducted dissolution testing of Budeprion XL, which uses a matrix for slow release, and Wellbutrin XL, which uses a membrane. According to the test results, the Budeprion XL matrix released more bupropion in the first 4 hours than the Wellbutrin XL membrane did.1 The FDA decided to conduct its own studies of Budeprion XL 300 mg and arrived at a similar conclusion. The original approval of the generic formulation was based on pharmacokinetic tests conducted on 150-mg tablets of the Impax/Teva formulation, with results extrapolated to the 300-mg tablet.

Bupropion is often used as an alternative to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or another antidepressant because it does not cause sexual dysfunction, sedation, or weight gain.2 It is also used as an aid in smoking cessation.3 It is contraindicated in patients at increased risk of seizures (including patients with a history of an eating disorder). Other 300-mg formulations of generic extended-release bupropion have not been associated with post-marketing complaints and continue to be available.

1. Wellbutrin versus generic bupropion. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2008; 50:54.

2. Drugs for depression and bipolar disorder. Treat Guidel Med Lett 2010; 8:35.

3. Drugs for tobacco dependence. Treat Guidel Med Lett 2008; 6:61.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2012 Oct 29;54(1402):88 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: 5-HTP for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 20, 2012;  (Issue 1384)
A Medical Letter reader asked about the use of the nutritional supplement 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) for treatment of depression. It is sold in health food stores, pharmacies and on-line for many indications...
A Medical Letter reader asked about the use of the nutritional supplement 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) for treatment of depression. It is sold in health food stores, pharmacies and on-line for many indications including depression, mood enhancement, emotional well being, and promotion of normal sleep.

5-HTP is the intermediate metabolite in the biosynthesis of serotonin from L-tryptophan.1 Many small studies in the 1970’s and 1980’s found 5-HTP helpful in the treatment of depression, but a Cochrane Review of 108 studies in patients with depression or dysthymia using 5-HTP or L-tryptophan found that the quality of the data was insufficient to establish the efficacy or safety of these products.2

In 1989, contaminated L-tryptophan supplements were implicated as the causative agent in an outbreak of eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome (EMS), which was associated with some deaths. There is no evidence that 5-HTP could cause the syndrome.

There is no acceptable evidence that 5-HTP or L-tryptophan offers any advantage over a selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) for treatment of depression. Taking 5-HTP or L-tryptophan in addition to an SSRI could cause serotonin syndrome.

There is no good reason to take 5-HTP or L-tryptophan.

1. N Iovieno et al. Second-tier natural antidepressants: review and critique. J Affect Disord 2010; 130:343.

2. K Shaw et al. Tryptophan and 5-hydroxytryptophan for depression. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2002; (1): CD003198.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2012 Feb 20;54(1384):16 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Adjunctive Antipsychotics for Major Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 19, 2011;  (Issue 1373)
Augmentation with a second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic is a treatment option for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) whose symptoms persist following antidepressant monotherapy. Aripiprazole...
Augmentation with a second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic is a treatment option for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) whose symptoms persist following antidepressant monotherapy. Aripiprazole (Abilify), olanzapine in a fixed-dose combination with fluoxetine (Symbyax), and extended-release quetiapine (Seroquel XR) have been approved by the FDA for such use.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Sep 19;53(1373):74-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Vilazodone (Viibryd) - A New Antidepressant

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 11, 2011;  (Issue 1368)
Vilazodone (Viibryd – Forest), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and partial 5-HT1A receptor agonist, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of depression. It has been claimed to have no...
Vilazodone (Viibryd – Forest), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and partial 5-HT1A receptor agonist, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of depression. It has been claimed to have no sexual side effects and not to cause weight gain.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Jul 11;53(1368):53-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Parkinson's Disease

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 1, 2011;  (Issue 101)
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is caused primarily by progressive degeneration of dopamine-containing neurons in the substantia nigra. Dopamine itself cannot be used to treat PD because it does not cross the...
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is caused primarily by progressive degeneration of dopamine-containing neurons in the substantia nigra. Dopamine itself cannot be used to treat PD because it does not cross the blood-brain barrier.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2011 Jan;9(101):1-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Extended-Release Trazodone (Oleptro) for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 15, 2010;  (Issue 1351)
The FDA has approved the marketing of an extended-release formulation of trazodone (Oleptro – Angelini Labopharm) for treatment of major depressive disorder in adults. Immediate-release trazodone has been...
The FDA has approved the marketing of an extended-release formulation of trazodone (Oleptro – Angelini Labopharm) for treatment of major depressive disorder in adults. Immediate-release trazodone has been available for treatment of depression for many years, but is used mostly in low doses for its sedating effects.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2010 Nov 15;52(1351):91-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Psychotic Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 1, 2010;  (Issue 96)
The antipsychotic drugs listed in Table 1 on the next page are more effective for treating the “positive symptoms” of schizophrenia (hallucinations and delusions) than the “negative symptoms” (apathy,...
The antipsychotic drugs listed in Table 1 on the next page are more effective for treating the “positive symptoms” of schizophrenia (hallucinations and delusions) than the “negative symptoms” (apathy, social withdrawal, and blunted affect). Some symptoms of schizophrenia and acute psychoses may improve rapidly after treatment with antipsychotic drugs, but chronic schizophrenia improves slowly over many weeks and some patients may continue to improve for months. Most patients with chronic schizophrenia require prolonged maintenance therapy, but the risk of tardive dyskinesia and adverse metabolic effects must be kept in mind.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2010 Aug;8(96):61-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Depression and Bipolar Disorder

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 1, 2010;  (Issue 93)
Drugs are not the only treatment for mood disorders. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has a long history of efficacy and...
Drugs are not the only treatment for mood disorders. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has a long history of efficacy and safety when drugs are ineffective, poorly tolerated or cannot be used. Some drugs are recommended here for indications that have not been approved by the FDA.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2010 May;8(93):35-42 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

L-Methylfolate (Deplin) for Depression and Schizophrenia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 19, 2010;  (Issue 1336)
L-methylfolate (Deplin — Pamlab) is a “medical food” marketed for adjunctive use in depression or schizophrenia in patients with suboptimal folate levels. It is available only by...
L-methylfolate (Deplin — Pamlab) is a “medical food” marketed for adjunctive use in depression or schizophrenia in patients with suboptimal folate levels. It is available only by prescription.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2010 Apr 19;52(1336):31-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Tamoxifen and SSRI Interactions

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 15, 2009;  (Issue 1314)
Use of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) is common in women taking tamoxifen (Nolvadex, and others) for breast cancer, both to treat depression and to decrease hot flashes. However, tamoxifen must...
Use of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) is common in women taking tamoxifen (Nolvadex, and others) for breast cancer, both to treat depression and to decrease hot flashes. However, tamoxifen must be metabolized by CYP2D6 to become pharmacologically fully active (MJ Higgins et al. J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2009; 7:203), and the SSRIs fluoxetine (Prozac, and others) and paroxetine (Paxil, and others) are strong inhibitors of CYP2D6. Sertraline (Zoloft, and others) inhibits CYP2D6 to a lesser extent. Citalopram (Celexa, and others) and escitalopram (Lexapro), the 2 other SSRIs approved for treatment of depression, are only weak inhibitors of CYP2D6.

Two observational studies presented at a recent meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (45th annual meeting, May 29-June 2, 2009, Orlando, FL abstracts CRA508, CRA509) examined the effect of strong inhibitors of CYP2D6 on the success rate of tamoxifen in preventing recurrence of breast cancer. One found that women who took fluoxetine, paroxetine or sertraline (or bupropion, duloxetine, terbinafine, quinidine or long-term diphenhydramine) with tamoxifen had a higher 2-year recurrence rate (13.9% vs. 7.5%). The other study found no association between cancer recurrence and use of a CYP2D6 inhibitor.

There is no good evidence that any one SSRI is more effective than any other for treatment of depression. For women who are taking tamoxifen and need to begin treatment with an SSRI to treat depression, citalopram or escitalopram might be the safest choice (Treat Guidel Med Lett 2006; 4:35). Use of an SSRI to treat hot flashes in women taking tamoxifen should probably be reconsidered.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Jun 15;51(1314):45-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) for Medication-Resistant Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 9, 2009;  (Issue 1305)
The FDA has cleared a new device for treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) resistant to antidepressant medication. The NeuroStar TMS System (Neuronetics) produces pulsed magnetic fields that can induce...
The FDA has cleared a new device for treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) resistant to antidepressant medication. The NeuroStar TMS System (Neuronetics) produces pulsed magnetic fields that can induce electrical currents in the brain. Unlike electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), it does not require anesthesia or induction of seizures. Other similar devices are under development.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Feb 9;51(1305):11-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Asthma

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 1, 2008;  (Issue 76)
No truly new drugs have been approved for treatment of asthma since omalizumab (Xolair) in 2003, but some randomized controlled trials of older drugs have been published, and new guidelines have become...
No truly new drugs have been approved for treatment of asthma since omalizumab (Xolair) in 2003, but some randomized controlled trials of older drugs have been published, and new guidelines have become available.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2008 Dec;6(76):83-90 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Safety of SSRIs in Pregnancy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 17, 2008;  (Issue 1299)
Depression occurs in up to 20% of pregnant women, and the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in these women has been increasing. Maternal depression has itself been associated with...
Depression occurs in up to 20% of pregnant women, and the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in these women has been increasing. Maternal depression has itself been associated with intrauterine growth problems and low birth weight, so the risks of exposure to antidepressants during pregnancy must be weighed against the risks of untreated depression, which also include self-harm, poor bonding and poor parenting. SSRIs available in the US for treatment of depression include citalopram (Celexa, and others), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, and others), paroxetine (Paxil, and others) and sertraline (Zoloft).

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Nov 17;50(1299):89-91 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Desvenlafaxine for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 19, 2008;  (Issue 1286)
The FDA has approved the marketing of desvenlafaxine (Pristiq - Wyeth), the main active metabolite of venlafaxine (Effexor, and others - Wyeth), for treatment of major depressive disorder. Venlafaxine, a...
The FDA has approved the marketing of desvenlafaxine (Pristiq - Wyeth), the main active metabolite of venlafaxine (Effexor, and others - Wyeth), for treatment of major depressive disorder. Venlafaxine, a norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), is available generically as an immediate-release tablet. Venlafaxine extended-release capsules (Effexor XR) are scheduled to go off-patent in 2010.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 May 19;50(1286):37-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Psychiatric Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 2006;  (Issue 46)
Drugs are not the only treatment for psychiatric illness. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is used for many of them as...
Drugs are not the only treatment for psychiatric illness. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is used for many of them as well. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has a long history of efficacy and safety when drugs are ineffective or cannot be used.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2006 Jun;4(46):35-46 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Transdermal Selegiline (Emsam)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 22, 2006;  (Issue 1235)
The FDA recently approved the monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) selegiline in a transdermal (patch) formulation (Emsam - Bristol-Myers Squibb/Somerset) for treatment of major depressive disorder. Selegiline is...
The FDA recently approved the monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) selegiline in a transdermal (patch) formulation (Emsam - Bristol-Myers Squibb/Somerset) for treatment of major depressive disorder. Selegiline is also available in an oral formulation (Eldepryl, and others) for treatment of Parkinson's disease.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2006 May 22;48(1235):41-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 20, 2005;  (Issue 1211)
A device that stimulates the vagus nerve was approved by the FDA in July 1997 for treatment of refractory epilepsy and is now considered "approvable" for treatment-resistant...
A device that stimulates the vagus nerve was approved by the FDA in July 1997 for treatment of refractory epilepsy and is now considered "approvable" for treatment-resistant depression.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Jun 20;47(1211):50 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 9, 2005;  (Issue 1208)
Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an endogenous adrenal steroid, is marketed as a dietary supplement in the US. It is widely promoted to reverse the effects of aging (loss of muscle, memory and libido) and has...
Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an endogenous adrenal steroid, is marketed as a dietary supplement in the US. It is widely promoted to reverse the effects of aging (loss of muscle, memory and libido) and has been used by athletes as a substitute for anabolic steroids. DHEA is banned by the International Olympic Committee, National Collegiate Athletic Association, National Football League and other sports organizations, but it was specifically exempted from becoming a controlled substance in the Anabolic Steroid Control Act of 2004.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 May 9;47(1208):37-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Extended-Release Carbamazepine (Equetro) for Bipolar Disorder

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 28, 2005;  (Issue 1205)
An extended-release formulation of carbamazepine, available since 1997 for treatment of epilepsy, has now been approved under a new name, Equetro, for acute mania and mixed episodes of bipolar disorder....
An extended-release formulation of carbamazepine, available since 1997 for treatment of epilepsy, has now been approved under a new name, Equetro, for acute mania and mixed episodes of bipolar disorder. Although the drug was effective in some patients for up to 6 months, it has not been approved for maintenance treatment. Carbamazepine has not been shown to be more effective than lithium or valproate, and it can cause serious adverse effects.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Mar 28;47(1205):27-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Duloxetine (Cymbalta): A New SNRI for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 11, 2004;  (Issue 1193)
Duloxetine hydrochloride (Cymbalta - Lilly), a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), has been approved by the FDA for treatment of major depressive disorder in adults, and more...
Duloxetine hydrochloride (Cymbalta - Lilly), a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), has been approved by the FDA for treatment of major depressive disorder in adults, and more recently for diabetic peripheral neuropathy as well. The Medical Letter will review its role in diabetic neuropathy in a future issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Oct 11;46(1193):81-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Gabapentin (Neurontin) for Chronic Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 12, 2004;  (Issue 1180)
Gabapentin (Neurontin - Pfizer), which has been available in the US since 1994, is approved by the FDA only for treatment of partial epilepsy and postherpetic neuralgia, but is widely used off-label for a...
Gabapentin (Neurontin - Pfizer), which has been available in the US since 1994, is approved by the FDA only for treatment of partial epilepsy and postherpetic neuralgia, but is widely used off-label for a number of other indications, especially neuropathic pain syndromes. According to one report, among Medicaid recipients in Florida receiving gabapentin, 71% of prescriptions were for chronic pain and 8% for seizures and neuralgia ("The Pink Sheet" February 2, 2004; 66:30).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Apr 12;46(1180):29-31 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Is Effexor More Effective than an SSRI?

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 16, 2004;  (Issue 1176)
Venlafaxine (Effexor, Effexor XR - Wyeth), an antidepressant that inhibits both norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake, was first approved by the FDA in 1993. It has been used mainly as a second-line agent for...
Venlafaxine (Effexor, Effexor XR - Wyeth), an antidepressant that inhibits both norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake, was first approved by the FDA in 1993. It has been used mainly as a second-line agent for patients who have not responded to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Some Medical Letter consultants have had the clinical impression that venlafaxine is more effective than an SSRI, particularly for patients with severe, classic depression (melancholia), and believe it should be considered a first-line drug (Treatment Guidelines from the Medical Letter 2003, 1:69). Is venlafaxine more effective than an SSRI for treatment of depression?
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Feb 16;46(1176):15-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Which SSRI?

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 24, 2003;  (Issue 1170)
Five different selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are promoted for treatment of depression and a sixth (fluvoxamine) for use in obsessive compulsive disorder. Which one should we prescribe for our...
Five different selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are promoted for treatment of depression and a sixth (fluvoxamine) for use in obsessive compulsive disorder. Which one should we prescribe for our patients?
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Nov 24;45(1170):93-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Are SSRIs Safe for Children?

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 7, 2003;  (Issue 1160)
A "Dear Colleague" letter from the UK's Committee on Safety of Medicines advised physicians, on the basis of unpublished data, not to use paroxetine (Paxil in the US; Seroxat in the UK) to treat children and...
A "Dear Colleague" letter from the UK's Committee on Safety of Medicines advised physicians, on the basis of unpublished data, not to use paroxetine (Paxil in the US; Seroxat in the UK) to treat children and adolescents with depression because of possible increased risk of suicidal behavior. This review describes the efficacy and safety of SSRIs in children.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Jul 7;45(1160):53-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Psychiatric Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2003;  (Issue 11)
The number of drugs marketed for psychiatric indications has increased sharply in recent years. The recommendations in this article are based on the results of controlled trials and on the experience and...
The number of drugs marketed for psychiatric indications has increased sharply in recent years. The recommendations in this article are based on the results of controlled trials and on the experience and opinions of Medical Letter consultants. Interactions with other drugs can be found in The Medical Letter Handbook of Adverse Drug Interactions, 2003.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2003 Jul;1(11):69-76 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Escitalopram (Lexapro) for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 30, 2002;  (Issue 1140)
Escitalopram (Lexapro - Forest), the active S-enantiomer of racemic citalopram (Celexa - Forest), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), was recently approved by the FDA for treatment of depression....
Escitalopram (Lexapro - Forest), the active S-enantiomer of racemic citalopram (Celexa - Forest), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), was recently approved by the FDA for treatment of depression. The manufacturer plans to stop promoting Celexa in favor of Lexapro; Celexa will continue to be available for patients already taking it.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Sep 30;44(1140):83-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Prozac Weekly

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 2, 2001;  (Issue 1101)
The FDA has approved a new formulation of fluoxetine for once-weekly maintenance treatment of depression in patients who have responded to daily fluoxetine...
The FDA has approved a new formulation of fluoxetine for once-weekly maintenance treatment of depression in patients who have responded to daily fluoxetine (Prozac).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2001 Apr 2;43(1101):27 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Depression and Anxiety

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 9, 1999;  (Issue 1050)
The number of drugs marketed for treatment of depression has increased in recent years. Antidepressants are generally also effective for treatment of...
The number of drugs marketed for treatment of depression has increased in recent years. Antidepressants are generally also effective for treatment of anxiety.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1999 Apr 9;41(1050):33-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

St. John's Wort

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 21, 1997;  (Issue 1014)
Many readers have asked the Medical Letter to evaluate St. John's wort, an herbal extract now widely sold in health food stores and pharmacies, for its effectiveness and safety in the treatment of depression....
Many readers have asked the Medical Letter to evaluate St. John's wort, an herbal extract now widely sold in health food stores and pharmacies, for its effectiveness and safety in the treatment of depression. St. John's wort is licensed in Germany for treatment of anxiety, depression and insomnia. In the USA, it is considered a dietary supplement and has not been evaluated by the FDA.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1997 Nov 21;39(1014):107-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Psychiatric Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 11, 1997;  (Issue 998)
The number of new drugs marketed for psychiatric indications has increased sharply in recent years. The recommendations in this article are based on the results of controlled trials and on the experience and...
The number of new drugs marketed for psychiatric indications has increased sharply in recent years. The recommendations in this article are based on the results of controlled trials and on the experience and opinions of Medical Letter consultants. Interactions with other drugs can be found in The Medical Letter Handbook of Adverse Drug Interactions, 1997.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1997 Apr 11;39(998):33-40 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Mirtazapine - A New Antidepressant

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 20, 1996;  (Issue 990)
Mirtazapine (mir taz a peen; Remeron - Organon) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of depression. A tetracyclic piperazinoazepine, it is an analog of mianserin, an...
Mirtazapine (mir taz a peen; Remeron - Organon) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of depression. A tetracyclic piperazinoazepine, it is an analog of mianserin, an antidepressant available in Europe, but is structurally unrelated to antidepressants previously available in the USA.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1996 Dec 20;38(990):113-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Nefazodone for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 14, 1995;  (Issue 946)
Nefazodone (Serzone - Bristol-Myers Squibb) was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of depression. A phenylpiperazine, nefazodone is chemically related to trazodone...
Nefazodone (Serzone - Bristol-Myers Squibb) was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of depression. A phenylpiperazine, nefazodone is chemically related to trazodone (Desyrel, and others).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1995 Apr 14;37(946):33-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Venlafaxine - A New Antidepressant

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 10, 1994;  (Issue 924)
Venlafaxine hydrochloride (Effexor - Wyeth-Ayerst) was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of depression. An aminomethyl-benzyl- cyclohexanol, it is chemically related to...
Venlafaxine hydrochloride (Effexor - Wyeth-Ayerst) was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of depression. An aminomethyl-benzyl- cyclohexanol, it is chemically related to bupropion (Wellbutrin).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1994 Jun 10;36(924):49-50 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Paroxetine for Treatment of Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 19, 1993;  (Issue 892)
Paroxetine (Paxil - SmithKline Beecham), a new selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is now available in the USA. Two other SSRIs, fluoxetine (Prozac - Medical Letter, 30:45, 1988; 32:83, 1990) and...
Paroxetine (Paxil - SmithKline Beecham), a new selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is now available in the USA. Two other SSRIs, fluoxetine (Prozac - Medical Letter, 30:45, 1988; 32:83, 1990) and sertraline (Zoloft - Medical Letter, 34:47, 1992), were approved previously.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1993 Mar 19;35(892):24-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Choice of an Antidepressant

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 19, 1993;  (Issue 892)
Since the introduction of fluoxetine (Prozac - Medical Letter, 30:45, 1988), bupropion (Wellbutrin - Medical Letter, 31:97, 1989), sertraline (Zoloft - Medical Letter, 34:47, 1992) and paroxetine (Paxil -...
Since the introduction of fluoxetine (Prozac - Medical Letter, 30:45, 1988), bupropion (Wellbutrin - Medical Letter, 31:97, 1989), sertraline (Zoloft - Medical Letter, 34:47, 1992) and paroxetine (Paxil - this issue), the choice of an antidepressant has become more difficult. Should these widely prescribed new drugs replace tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, and others), imipramine (Tofranil, and others), or nortriptyline (Aventyl, and others) for treatment of most patients with depression?
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1993 Mar 19;35(892):25-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Sertraline For Treatment Of Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 15, 1992;  (Issue 870)
Sertraline (Zoloft - Roerig), a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was recently approved for marketing by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of depression. Another serotonin reuptake inhibitor,...
Sertraline (Zoloft - Roerig), a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was recently approved for marketing by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of depression. Another serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (Prozac), is prescribed more frequently in the USA than any other antidepressant (Medical Letter, 32:83, 1990).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1992 May 15;34(870):47-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Fluoxetine (Prozac) Revisited

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 7, 1990;  (Issue 826)
In the short time since fluoxetine (Prozac - Lilly) first became available in the USA (Medical Letter, 30:45, 1988), it has become the most frequently prescribed of all antidepressants. Some recent reports,...
In the short time since fluoxetine (Prozac - Lilly) first became available in the USA (Medical Letter, 30:45, 1988), it has become the most frequently prescribed of all antidepressants. Some recent reports, however, have questioned its safety.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1990 Sep 7;32(826):83-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Sudden Death in children A Tricyclic Antidepressant

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 1990;  (Issue 819)
The 1990 labeling for Norpramin, the Merrell Dow brand of the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine, reports the occurrence of sudden death in an eight-year-old child treated with the drug. Desipramine is also...
The 1990 labeling for Norpramin, the Merrell Dow brand of the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine, reports the occurrence of sudden death in an eight-year-old child treated with the drug. Desipramine is also available as Pertofrane (Rorer) and generically.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1990 Jun 1;32(819):53 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Bupropion For Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 3, 1989;  (Issue 804)
Bupropion (Wellbutrin - Burroughs Wellcome) was recently marketed in the USA for treatment of depression. First approved by the Food and Drug Administration in late 1985, the drug was withdrawn from the...
Bupropion (Wellbutrin - Burroughs Wellcome) was recently marketed in the USA for treatment of depression. First approved by the Food and Drug Administration in late 1985, the drug was withdrawn from the market in early 1986 because of a high incidence of seizures in one study.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1989 Nov 3;31(804):97-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Parkinsonism

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 16, 1988;  (Issue 781)
Patients with Parkinson's disease have a deficiency of the neurotransmitter dopamine, a catecholamine. Dpamine itself cannot be used to treat the disease because it does not cross the blood-brain barrier, but...
Patients with Parkinson's disease have a deficiency of the neurotransmitter dopamine, a catecholamine. Dpamine itself cannot be used to treat the disease because it does not cross the blood-brain barrier, but its metabolic precursor, levodopa, does cross into the brain and is converted to dopamine by a decarboxylase present both in the brain and in the intestinal tract (JM Cedarbaum, Clin Pharmacokinet, 13:141, 1987).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1988 Dec 16;30(781):113-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Clomipramine for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 4, 1988;  (Issue 778)
Clomipramine (Anafranil - Ciba-Geigy), a tricyclic antidepressant, is now available for treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in accordance with the new US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...
Clomipramine (Anafranil - Ciba-Geigy), a tricyclic antidepressant, is now available for treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in accordance with the new US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) procedure for promising investigational drugs (FE Young et al, JAMA, 259:2267, 1988). In other countries, clomipramine has been widely used for many years for treatment of depression.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1988 Nov 4;30(778):102-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Fluoxetine For Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 22, 1988;  (Issue 764)
Fluoxetine (Prozac - Dista), a phenylpropylamide, is the first serotonin-reuptake blocker introduced in the USA for treatment of . It is being promoted as causing fewer adverse effects than other...
Fluoxetine (Prozac - Dista), a phenylpropylamide, is the first serotonin-reuptake blocker introduced in the USA for treatment of . It is being promoted as causing fewer adverse effects than other antidepressants. Claims of greater safety and patient tolerability have often been made for new non-tricyclic antidepressants in recent years, but unpredicted adverse effects have emerged with widespread use, including priapism with trazodone (Desyrel - Medical Letter, 26:35, 1984) and fatal hemolytic anemia with nomifensine (Merital - Medical Letter, 27:73, 1985).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1988 Apr 22;30(764):45-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction