Matching articles for "influenza"

Influenza Vaccine for 2022-2023

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 3, 2022;  (Issue 1660)
Annual vaccination in the US against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Influenza vaccines that are available in the US for the 2022-2023...
Annual vaccination in the US against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Influenza vaccines that are available in the US for the 2022-2023 season are listed in Table 2.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Oct 3;64(1660):153-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza for 2021-2022

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 10, 2022;  (Issue 1641)
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but complications such as pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur, especially in patients at higher risk for complications (see Table 1). Antiviral...
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but complications such as pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur, especially in patients at higher risk for complications (see Table 1). Antiviral drugs recommended for treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza this season are listed in Table 2. Updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Jan 10;64(1641):2-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Chart: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza for 2021-2022 (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 10, 2022;  (Issue 1641)
...
View the Comparison Chart: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza for 2021-2022
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Jan 10;64(1641):e1-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2021-2022

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 4, 2021;  (Issue 1634)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication.1 Available influenza vaccines for the 2021-2022 season are listed in Table...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication.1 Available influenza vaccines for the 2021-2022 season are listed in Table 2.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Oct 4;63(1634):153-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antibacterial Drugs for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 25, 2021;  (Issue 1616)
Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is usually empiric, with selected antibiotic regimens directed against some of the most common causative pathogens. Recommended empiric regimens are listed in...
Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is usually empiric, with selected antibiotic regimens directed against some of the most common causative pathogens. Recommended empiric regimens are listed in Table 2; recommended antibiotic dosages for treatment of CAP are listed in Tables 3 and 4. Joint guidelines for treatment of CAP by the American Thoracic Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (ATS/IDSA) were updated in 2019.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Jan 25;63(1616):10-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Baloxavir (Xofluza) for Post-Exposure Prophylaxis of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 11, 2021;  (Issue 1615)
The oral polymerase acidic endonuclease inhibitor baloxavir marboxil (Xofluza — Genentech) is now FDAapproved for post-exposure prophylaxis of influenza in patients ≥12 years old. Baloxavir was approved...
The oral polymerase acidic endonuclease inhibitor baloxavir marboxil (Xofluza — Genentech) is now FDAapproved for post-exposure prophylaxis of influenza in patients ≥12 years old. Baloxavir was approved for treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients ≥12 years old in 2018.1 Two neuraminidase inhibitors are FDA-approved for prophylaxis of influenza: oseltamivir (Tamiflu, and generics) in patients ≥1 year old, and zanamivir (Relenza) in patients ≥5 years old.2 Unlike oseltamivir and zanamivir, baloxavir is not FDA-approved for pre-exposure prophylaxis of influenza during institutional or community outbreaks.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Jan 11;63(1615):2-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza for 2020-2021

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 2, 2020;  (Issue 1610)
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but complications such as pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur, especially in patients at increased risk for influenza complications (see Table...
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but complications such as pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur, especially in patients at increased risk for influenza complications (see Table 1). Antiviral drugs recommended for treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza this season are listed in Table 2. Updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Nov 2;62(1610):169-73 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Chart: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 2, 2020;  (Issue 1610)
...
View the Comparison Chart: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Nov 2;62(1610):e176-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2020-2021

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 21, 2020;  (Issue 1607)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Vaccination of all eligible persons can reduce the prevalence of influenza illness...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Vaccination of all eligible persons can reduce the prevalence of influenza illness and symptoms that might be confused with those of COVID-19. Available vaccines and recommendations for specific patient populations for the 2020-2021 season are listed in Tables 2 and 3. Lower rates of influenza illness have been observed this season in the Southern Hemisphere, probably because of masking, social distancing, school closures, and travel restrictions.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Sep 21;62(1607):145-50 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Some Drugs for COVID-19

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1595)
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in...
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in treating it. Definitive answers are lacking, but some recommendations can be made. For additional information on specific drugs, see our table Some Drugs Being Considered for Treatment of COVID-19.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1595):49-50 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Table: Treatments Considered for COVID-19 (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1595)
...
View the Table: Treatments Considered for COVID-19
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1595):e1-289 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Some Drugs for COVID-19

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 6, 2020;  (Issue 1919)
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in...
The severity and rapid spread of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2) have raised questions about the use of some drugs in patients with the disease and whether currently available drugs could be effective in treating it. Definitive answers are lacking, but some recommendations can be made. For additional information on specific drugs, see our table Some Drugs Being Considered for Treatment of COVID-19.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 6;62(1919):1 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 13, 2020;  (Issue 1589)
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur. FDA-approved antiviral drugs for influenza are listed in Table 2. The neuraminidase inhibitors...
Influenza is generally a self-limited illness, but pneumonia, respiratory failure, and death can occur. FDA-approved antiviral drugs for influenza are listed in Table 2. The neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir (Tamiflu, and generics), which is taken orally, and zanamivir (Relenza), which is inhaled, are approved for prophylaxis and treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza. The IV neuraminidase inhibitor peramivir (Rapivab) and the oral polymerase acidic (PA) endonuclease inhibitor baloxavir marboxil (Xofluza) are approved only for treatment. All of these drugs are active against both influenza A and influenza B viruses. Updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Jan 13;62(1589):1-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Expanded Table: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 13, 2020;  (Issue 1589)
...
View the Expanded Table: Antiviral Drugs for Influenza
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Jan 13;62(1589):e9-10 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2019-2020

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 21, 2019;  (Issue 1583)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Available vaccines and recommendations for specific patient populations for the...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a contraindication. Available vaccines and recommendations for specific patient populations for the 2019-2020 season are listed in Tables 2 and 3.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Oct 21;61(1583):161-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Elderberry for Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 25, 2019;  (Issue 1566)
Patients may ask about taking elderberry for prevention and treatment of influenza. Products containing elderberry are promoted for relief of cold and flu symptoms and as an immune system...
Patients may ask about taking elderberry for prevention and treatment of influenza. Products containing elderberry are promoted for relief of cold and flu symptoms and as an immune system booster.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Feb 25;61(1566):32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Treatment and Prophylaxis of Seasonal Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 14, 2019;  (Issue 1563)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of seasonal influenza (see Table 1). Frequently updated information on influenza activity, influenza testing, and antiviral resistance is...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of seasonal influenza (see Table 1). Frequently updated information on influenza activity, influenza testing, and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Jan 14;61(1563):1-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Expanded Table: Antiviral Drugs for Treatment and Prophylaxis of Seasonal Influenza 2018-2019 (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 14, 2019;  (Issue 1563)
...
View the Expanded Table: Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Jan 14;61(1563):e11-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Baloxavir Marboxil (Xofluza) for Treatment of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 3, 2018;  (Issue 1561)
The FDA has approved baloxavir marboxil (Xofluza – Shionogi/Genentech), the first polymerase acidic (PA) endonuclease inhibitor, for single-dose, oral treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients...
The FDA has approved baloxavir marboxil (Xofluza – Shionogi/Genentech), the first polymerase acidic (PA) endonuclease inhibitor, for single-dose, oral treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients ≥12 years old. Baloxavir is the first drug with a new mechanism of action to be approved for treatment of influenza in almost 20 years.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Dec 3;60(1561):193-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2018-2019

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 22, 2018;  (Issue 1558)
Routine annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old. Recommendations for the current season for specific patient populations are listed in Tables 2 and...
Routine annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old. Recommendations for the current season for specific patient populations are listed in Tables 2 and 4.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Oct 22;60(1558):169-73 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza 2017-2018

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 1, 2018;  (Issue 1537)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. Frequently updated information on influenza activity, testing for influenza, and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. Frequently updated information on influenza activity, testing for influenza, and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Jan 1;60(1537):1-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2017-2018

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 9, 2017;  (Issue 1531)
Routine annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a specific...
Routine annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a specific contraindication.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Oct 9;59(1531):163-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza 2016-2017

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 2, 2017;  (Issue 1511)
Antiviral drugs can be used for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza. Frequently updated information on influenza activity, testing for influenza, and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at...
Antiviral drugs can be used for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza. Frequently updated information on influenza activity, testing for influenza, and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Jan 2;59(1511):1-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2016-2017

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 10, 2016;  (Issue 1505)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a specific...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a specific contraindication.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Oct 10;58(1505):127-30 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Fluad - An Adjuvanted Seasonal Influenza Vaccine for Older Adults

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 18, 2016;  (Issue 1486)
The FDA has approved Fluad (Seqirus), an adjuvanted trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine, for immunization of adults ≥65 years old. It will become available later this year for use during the 2016-2017...
The FDA has approved Fluad (Seqirus), an adjuvanted trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine, for immunization of adults ≥65 years old. It will become available later this year for use during the 2016-2017 influenza season. Fluad is the second influenza vaccine to be approved in the US specifically for older adults; Fluzone High-Dose was the first. Fluad has been available in other countries for many years.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Jan 18;58(1486):8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza 2015-2016

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 21, 2015;  (Issue 1484)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination1 for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination1 for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Dec 21;57(1484):169-71 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2015-2016

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 14, 2015;  (Issue 1477)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a specific...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is recommended for everyone ≥6 months old without a specific contraindication.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Sep 14;57(1477):125-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Peramivir (Rapivab): An IV Neuraminidase Inhibitor for Treatment of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 2, 2015;  (Issue 1461)
The FDA has approved peramivir (Rapivab – BioCryst), an IV neuraminidase inhibitor administered as a single dose, for treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients ≥18 years old who have had...
The FDA has approved peramivir (Rapivab – BioCryst), an IV neuraminidase inhibitor administered as a single dose, for treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients ≥18 years old who have had symptoms for no more than 2 days. Peramivir was available temporarily in the US during the 2009-2010 influenza season under an emergency use authorization for treatment of hospitalized patients. It has been available in some Asian countries since 2010. Peramivir is the third neuraminidase inhibitor to be approved in the US. Oseltamivir (Tamiflu), which is taken orally, and zanamivir (Relenza), which is inhaled, are approved for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza in children and adults.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Feb 2;57(1461):17-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Concerns about Oseltamivir (Tamiflu)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 19, 2015;  (Issue 1460)
Some readers of our article on Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza have expressed concerns regarding our recommendation for use of the oral neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir (Tamiflu) to treat high-risk...
Some readers of our article on Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza have expressed concerns regarding our recommendation for use of the oral neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir (Tamiflu) to treat high-risk patients with confirmed or suspected influenza illness, citing the British Medical Journal and The Cochrane Collaboration, which have contended that there is no acceptable evidence that the drug prevents complications or hospitalizations and have questioned the completeness of the results of controlled trials conducted by the manufacturer (Roche).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Jan 19;57(1460):14 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Influenza in 2015

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 5, 2015;  (Issue 1459)
The CDC has announced that the most common influenza viruses circulating now are influenza A H3N2, which tend to cause more severe disease, and that about half of these viruses are antigenically different from...
The CDC has announced that the most common influenza viruses circulating now are influenza A H3N2, which tend to cause more severe disease, and that about half of these viruses are antigenically different from the H3N2 strain in this year’s flu vaccine.1 Vaccination may still have a protective effect, even against drifted variants, and patients who have not received this year’s vaccine2 should be encouraged to do so.

Prompt treatment of confirmed or suspected influenza illness with antiviral drugs is recommended for hospitalized patients, for those with severe, complicated, or progressive illness, and for persons at high risk of complications: children <2 years old, adults ≥65 years old, women who are pregnant or ≤2 weeks postpartum, persons <19 years old receiving long-term aspirin therapy, morbidly obese patients (BMI ≥40), persons of American Indian/Alaskan Native heritage, residents of nursing homes or chronic-care facilities, and patients who are immunosuppressed or have chronic diseases such as asthma, diabetes, or heart, lung, or kidney disease.

The neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir (Tamiflu), which is taken orally, and zanamivir (Relenza), which is inhaled, taken within 48 hours after the onset of illness can decrease the duration of fever and symptoms in uncomplicated influenza and may reduce the incidence of pneumonia and death in high-risk patients.3 All of the influenza viruses tested to date for resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors this season have been susceptible to both oseltamivir and zanamivir.1

  1. CDC health advisory regarding the potential for circulation of drifted influenza A (H3N2) viruses. Available at http://emergency.cdc.gov. Accessed December 18, 2014.
  2. Influenza vaccine for 2014-2015. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2014; 56:97.
  3. Antiviral drugs for seasonal influenza 2014-2015. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2014; 56:121.


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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Jan 5;57(1459):1 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Seasonal Influenza 2014-2015

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 8, 2014;  (Issue 1457)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on influenza activity and antiviral resistance is available from the CDC at www.cdc.gov/flu.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Dec 8;56(1457):121-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Vaccines for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 24, 2014;  (Issue 1456)
Patients planning to travel to other countries should be up to date on routine immunizations and, depending on their destination, duration of travel, and planned activities, may also need to receive certain...
Patients planning to travel to other countries should be up to date on routine immunizations and, depending on their destination, duration of travel, and planned activities, may also need to receive certain travel-specific vaccines. Common travel vaccines are listed in Table 2. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at www.cdc.gov/travel. Guidelines for routine adult immunization are discussed in a separate issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Nov 24;56(1456):115-20 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2014-2015

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 13, 2014;  (Issue 1453)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses has been shown to decrease influenza illness and...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses has been shown to decrease influenza illness and its complications.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Oct 13;56(1453):97-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza 2013-2014

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 20, 2014;  (Issue 1434)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on antiviral resistance is available at...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of influenza and as an adjunct to influenza vaccination for prophylaxis. Frequently updated information on antiviral resistance is available at www.cdc.gov.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Jan 20;56(1434):6-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2013-2014

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 16, 2013;  (Issue 1425)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses has been shown to decrease influenza illness and its complications. Several new vaccines are available for the current...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses has been shown to decrease influenza illness and its complications. Several new vaccines are available for the current season.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2013 Sep 16;55(1425):73-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 1, 2013;  (Issue 127)
The drugs of choice for treatment of viral infections (other than HIV) and their dosages are listed in Tables 1-6 on the pages that follow. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not...
The drugs of choice for treatment of viral infections (other than HIV) and their dosages are listed in Tables 1-6 on the pages that follow. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA. Vaccines used for the prevention of viral infections are discussed elsewhere.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Mar;11(127):19-30 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Two New Seasonal Influenza Vaccines

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 4, 2013;  (Issue 1409)
Two new trivalent influenza vaccines, Flucelvax (Novartis) and Flublok (Protein Sciences), will soon be available for prevention of seasonal influenza in adults ≥18 years old (Flucelvax) and 18-49 years old...
Two new trivalent influenza vaccines, Flucelvax (Novartis) and Flublok (Protein Sciences), will soon be available for prevention of seasonal influenza in adults ≥18 years old (Flucelvax) and 18-49 years old (Flublok). Unlike other available influenza vaccines, neither vaccine is produced in eggs, removing any concern regarding use in egg-allergic patients. Avoiding the use of eggs should allow for faster production of these 2 new vaccines, which could be especially beneficial during a pandemic.

Flucelvax is prepared in a similar manner to other influenza vaccines, but the influenza virus is grown in canine kidney cell culture instead of chicken eggs. In an unpublished study summarized in the package insert comparing Flucelvax with placebo in more than 11,000 patients during the 2007-2008 season, the new vaccine was effective in preventing about 84% of cases of influenza due to matching strains and was about 70% effective when non-matching strains were included.

Flublok is produced without use of influenza virus or chicken eggs; a gene that encodes for hemagglutinin antigen (HA) is introduced into baculovirus, a virus that infects insect cells, and the replicating baculovirus produces large amounts of HA. In a study in about 4,600 adults conducted during one influenza season, Flublok was about 45% effective compared to placebo in preventing culture-confirmed influenza despite a significant antigenic mismatch between the vaccine and circulating viruses (96% of circulating strains did not match the vaccine). It was 75% effective in preventing illness caused by matching strains.1

Both Flublok and Flucelvax provide protection against the same strains as the other vaccines available for the 2012-2013 influenza season.2

1. JJ Treanor et al. Protective efficacy of a trivalent recombinant hemagglutinin protein vaccine (FluBlok) against influenza in healthy adults: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Vaccine 2011; 29:7733.

2. Influenza vaccine 2012-2013. Med Lett Drugs Ther 2012; 54:77.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2013 Feb 4;55(1409):12 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza 2012-2013

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 10, 2012;  (Issue 1405)
Antiviral drugs can be used as an adjunct to vaccination for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza. In recent years, the susceptibility of circulating influenza virus strains has evolved rapidly and...
Antiviral drugs can be used as an adjunct to vaccination for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza. In recent years, the susceptibility of circulating influenza virus strains has evolved rapidly and treatment recommendations have changed during the influenza season. Frequently updated information on antiviral resistance is available at www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/antivirals.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2012 Dec 10;54(1405):97-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2012-2013

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 1, 2012;  (Issue 1400)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is the most effective method of preventing influenza and has been shown to decrease influenza illness and its complications. A new vaccine is available...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is the most effective method of preventing influenza and has been shown to decrease influenza illness and its complications. A new vaccine is available for the current season. Chemoprophylaxis and treatment of influenza was discussed in an earlier issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2012 Oct 1;54(1400):77-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 9, 2012;  (Issue 1381)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. In recent years, the susceptibility of circulating influenza strains has evolved rapidly and treatment recommendations have changed...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. In recent years, the susceptibility of circulating influenza strains has evolved rapidly and treatment recommendations have changed during the influenza season. The CDC influenza website provides frequently updated information on antiviral resistance (www.cdc.gov/flu).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2012 Jan 9;54(1381):1-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine for 2011-2012

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 17, 2011;  (Issue 1375)
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is the most effective method of preventing influenza and has been shown to decrease influenza illness and complications. For the current season, a...
Annual vaccination against influenza A and B viruses is the most effective method of preventing influenza and has been shown to decrease influenza illness and complications. For the current season, a new inactivated intradermal vaccine (Fluzone Intradermal) has been FDA-approved for use in adults 18-64 years old. An upcoming issue will review chemoprophylaxis and treatment of influenza.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Oct 17;53(1375):81-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 10, 2011;  (Issue 1355)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of patients with influenza and for prophylaxis when exposure to the disease occurs before or less than 2 weeks after vaccination. They can also be used to control...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of patients with influenza and for prophylaxis when exposure to the disease occurs before or less than 2 weeks after vaccination. They can also be used to control institutional outbreaks of influenza. In recent years, the susceptibility of circulating influenza strains has evolved rapidly and treatment recommendations have changed during the influenza season. The CDC influenza web site provides frequently updated information on antiviral resistance (www.cdc.gov/flu)
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Jan 10;53(1355):1-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Non-HIV Viral Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 1, 2010;  (Issue 98)
The drugs of choice for treatment of non-HIV viral infections and their dosages are listed in Tables 1-6 on the pages that follow. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been...
The drugs of choice for treatment of non-HIV viral infections and their dosages are listed in Tables 1-6 on the pages that follow. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA. Vaccines used for the prevention of viral infections are discussed in another issue of Treatment Guidelines.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2010 Oct;8(98):71-82 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 1, 2009;  (Issue 87)
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for information about appropriate vaccines and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. Guidelines are also available from the Infectious Diseases...
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for information about appropriate vaccines and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. Guidelines are also available from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2009 Nov;7(87):83-94 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

H1N1 Vaccine for Prevention of Pandemic Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 5, 2009;  (Issue 1322)
The FDA has licensed 4 new monovalent vaccines for prevention of respiratory illness caused by a new influenza A H1N1 virus that appears to be derived from a swine strain. The 5th vaccine should be licensed...
The FDA has licensed 4 new monovalent vaccines for prevention of respiratory illness caused by a new influenza A H1N1 virus that appears to be derived from a swine strain. The 5th vaccine should be licensed soon. All of these vaccines are expected to become available in October. An intranasal formulation is expected in the first week of October.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Oct 5;51(1322):77-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Seasonal Trivalent Influenza Vaccine for 2009-2010

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 21, 2009;  (Issue 1321)
Two separate influenza vaccines will be available this season: the usual seasonal trivalent vaccine and a monovalent vaccine (not yet licensed by the FDA) directed at the novel H1N1 virus currently causing...
Two separate influenza vaccines will be available this season: the usual seasonal trivalent vaccine and a monovalent vaccine (not yet licensed by the FDA) directed at the novel H1N1 virus currently causing pandemic infection. The next issue of the Medical Letter will review the pandemic H1N1 vaccine.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Sep 21;51(1321):73-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Adult Immunization

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2009;  (Issue 80)
Although immunization programs have produced high vaccination rates in US infants and children, similar successes have not been achieved in adults. Vaccines recommended for routine use in adults are reviewed...
Although immunization programs have produced high vaccination rates in US infants and children, similar successes have not been achieved in adults. Vaccines recommended for routine use in adults are reviewed here. Vaccines for travel are reviewed separately.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2009 Apr;7(80):27-36 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

More Resistance to Oseltamivir (Tamiflu)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 26, 2009;  (Issue 1304)
Since publication of our recent article on antiviral drugs for influenza, increased levels of resistance to oseltamivir (Tamiflu) have been detected in influenza A H1N1...
Since publication of our recent article on antiviral drugs for influenza, increased levels of resistance to oseltamivir (Tamiflu) have been detected in influenza A H1N1 strains.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Jan 26;51(1304):5-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 15, 2008;  (Issue 1301)
Antiviral drugs are an important adjunct to influenza vaccination and can be used for treatment of patients with influenza within 2 days of the onset of illness and for chemoprophylaxis of influenza exposures...
Antiviral drugs are an important adjunct to influenza vaccination and can be used for treatment of patients with influenza within 2 days of the onset of illness and for chemoprophylaxis of influenza exposures that occur before or less than 2 weeks after vaccination. Patients who are immunocompromised or immunosuppressed, have pulmonary disease, are elderly or are healthcare workers may also be appropriate candidates for chemoprophylaxis.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Dec 15;50(1301):98-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine 2008-2009

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 6, 2008;  (Issue 1296)
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce influenza complications. Changes this year include a vaccine with three new...
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce influenza complications. Changes this year include a vaccine with three new influenza antigens and expanded age criteria to include all children 6 months to 18 years of age. An upcoming issue of The Medical Letter will review drugs for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Oct 6;50(1296):77-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Influenza Developments

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 24, 2008;  (Issue 1282)
Recent reports (D Kaye.Clin Infect Dis April 1, 2008;46:iii) indicate that 2 of the 3 components of this year's influenza vaccine (Med Lett Drugs Ther 2007;49:81), the influenza B and A/H3N2 antigens, do not...
Recent reports (D Kaye.Clin Infect Dis April 1, 2008;46:iii) indicate that 2 of the 3 components of this year's influenza vaccine (Med Lett Drugs Ther 2007;49:81), the influenza B and A/H3N2 antigens, do not matchup well with circulating strains. The B component is probably not protective. The A/H3N2 antigen in the vaccine probably provides some protection, particularly for high-risk patients. The third component, the A/H1N1 antigen, is protective against circulating A/H1N1 influenza viruses, but these viruses, unlike previous A/H1N1 strains, are developing some resistance to oseltamivir (Tamiflu), particularly in Europe; in the US and Canada, about 5% of influenza A/H1N1 isolates are resistant to oseltamivir in vitro.

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Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 Mar 24;50(1282):21-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 22, 2007;  (Issue 1272)
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of patients with influenza and for prophylaxis of influenza exposures that occur before or less than 2 weeks after vaccination. They can also be used to control...
Antiviral drugs can be used for treatment of patients with influenza and for prophylaxis of influenza exposures that occur before or less than 2 weeks after vaccination. They can also be used to control institutional influenza outbreaks and for prophylaxis in years when circulating strains differ from those included in the vaccine.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2007 Oct 22;49(1272):85-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine 2007-2008

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 8, 2007;  (Issue 1271)
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce associated complications....
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce associated complications.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2007 Oct 8;49(1271):81-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Non-HIV Viral Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2007;  (Issue 59)
The drugs of choice for treatment of non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in Tables 1-6. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA....
The drugs of choice for treatment of non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in Tables 1-6. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA. Vaccines used in the prevention of viral infections are discussed in the "Adult Immunization" issue of Treatment Guidelines.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2007 Jul;5(59):59-70 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Addendum: Influenza Vaccine 2006-2007

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 23, 2006;  (Issue 1246)
Since the publication of our article on influenza vaccine (October 9, 2006), a fourth inactivated vaccine (FluLaval - GlaxoSmithKline) has been approved by the FDA for use in people ≥18 years old. It is sold...
Since the publication of our article on influenza vaccine (October 9, 2006), a fourth inactivated vaccine (FluLaval - GlaxoSmithKline) has been approved by the FDA for use in people ≥18 years old. It is sold in 5-mL multi-dose vials. Each 0.5-mL intramuscular dose contains 25 mcg of mercury.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2006 Oct 23;48(1246):85 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine 2006-2007

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 9, 2006;  (Issue 1245)
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce associated...
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce associated complications.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2006 Oct 9;48(1245):81-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Adult Immunization

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2006;  (Issue 47)
Although immunization programs have produced high vaccination rates in US infants and children, similar successes have not been achieved in adults. Vaccines recommended for routine use in adults are reviewed...
Although immunization programs have produced high vaccination rates in US infants and children, similar successes have not been achieved in adults. Vaccines recommended for routine use in adults are reviewed here. Immunizations for travel were reviewed in a recent issue.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2006 Jul;4(47):47-54 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 1, 2006;  (Issue 45)
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for information about immunizations and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the Centers...
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for information about immunizations and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at 877-FYI-TRIP (877-394-8747) or www.cdc.gov/travel.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2006 May;4(45):25-34 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Update: Influenza Resistance to Amantadine and Rimantadine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 30, 2006;  (Issue 1227)
Our article on Antiviral Drugs for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Influenza (Med Lett Drugs Ther 2005;47:93) mentioned possible use of amantadine (Symmetrel, and others) and rimantadine (Flumadine, and others),...
Our article on Antiviral Drugs for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Influenza (Med Lett Drugs Ther 2005;47:93) mentioned possible use of amantadine (Symmetrel, and others) and rimantadine (Flumadine, and others), but warned that the incidence of resistance has increased substantially. The CDC recently issued a Health Alert (www.cdc.gov) saying that current evidence indicates that a high proportion of circulating influenza A viruses in the US are now resistant to amantadine and rimantadine and they should not be used for this indication, at least this year. Click here to go to this update article.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2006 Jan 30;48(1227):12 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 21, 2005;  (Issue 1222)
Antiviral prophylaxis is indicated for influenza exposures that occur before (or less than 2 weeks after) vaccination with inactivated vaccine, or in years when circulating strains differ from those included in...
Antiviral prophylaxis is indicated for influenza exposures that occur before (or less than 2 weeks after) vaccination with inactivated vaccine, or in years when circulating strains differ from those included in the vaccine. Antiviral drugs can also be used for treatment of patients who develop symptoms of influenza, regardless of vaccination status.
Please see Update: Influenza Resistance to Amantadine and Rimantadine
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Nov 21;47(1222):93-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine 2005-2006

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 24, 2005;  (Issue 1220)
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce associated complications. A future issue of The Medical Letter will review drug...
Annual immunization against influenza A and B is the most effective method of preventing infection and has been shown to reduce associated complications. A future issue of The Medical Letter will review drug prophylaxis and treatment of influenza.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Oct 24;47(1220):85-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Non-HIV Viral Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 1, 2005;  (Issue 32)
The drugs of choice for non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in the tables that begin on page 24. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the...
The drugs of choice for non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in the tables that begin on page 24. Some of the indications and dosages recommended here have not been approved by the FDA.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2005 Apr;3(32):23-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral KLEENEX

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 3, 2005;  (Issue 1199)
The first commercially available virucidal tissue, KLEENEX Anti-Viral Tissue (Kimberly-Clark), was recently introduced and is being heavily promoted to the general public. Patients may ask healthcare providers...
The first commercially available virucidal tissue, KLEENEX Anti-Viral Tissue (Kimberly-Clark), was recently introduced and is being heavily promoted to the general public. Patients may ask healthcare providers about the usefulness of these products. Theoretically, virucidal tissues could interrupt transmission of viral infections by blocking hand contamination and/or small particle aerosols from nose-blowing, sneezing and coughing.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Jan 3;47(1199):3-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Antiviral Drugs for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 25, 2004;  (Issue 1194)
Due to the unanticipated shortage in the US supply of inactivated influenza vaccine, many persons who normally would have received the vaccine will be unable to get it this year. Antiviral drugs can be used...
Due to the unanticipated shortage in the US supply of inactivated influenza vaccine, many persons who normally would have received the vaccine will be unable to get it this year. Antiviral drugs can be used for prophylaxis of unvaccinated persons who are exposed to influenza, and for treatment of both vaccinated and unvaccinated patients who develop symptoms of the disease.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Oct 25;46(1194):85-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine 2004-2005

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 11, 2004;  (Issue 1193)
Last year influenza season began in October, peaked in December (both much earlier than usual), and was associated with severe disease, particularly in children. Much of the illness was due to a circulating...
Last year influenza season began in October, peaked in December (both much earlier than usual), and was associated with severe disease, particularly in children. Much of the illness was due to a circulating influenza A H3N2 strain (Fujian type) that had drifted antigenically from the H3N2 strain in the vaccine. The vaccine for the 2004-05 influenza season includes A/Wyoming/3/2003 (H3N2), which is antigenically equivalent to the Fujian strain, A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1), which is unchanged, and a new B strain, either B/Jiangsu/10/2003 or B/Jilin/20/2003, which are both antigenically equivalent to B/Shanghai/361/2002.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Oct 11;46(1193):83-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

FluMist: An Intranasal Live Influenza Vaccine - Addendum

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 16, 2004;  (Issue 1176)
Addendum: FluMist Storage: The storage requirements for FluMist, the intranasal live-attenuated influenza vaccine (Medical Letter 2003; 45:65) have changed. New data have shown that frost-free freezers are...
Addendum: FluMist Storage: The storage requirements for FluMist, the intranasal live-attenuated influenza vaccine (Medical Letter 2003; 45:65) have changed. New data have shown that frost-free freezers are appropriate for storage for at least 3 months, without need for a freezer-box insert.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Feb 16;46(1176):16 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Prevention 2003-2004

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 29, 2003;  (Issue 1166)
Unlike the last few years there is no early-season shortage of influenza vaccine. Immunization programs for all recommended individuals can proceed. There are 2 new influenza vaccine formulations available...
Unlike the last few years there is no early-season shortage of influenza vaccine. Immunization programs for all recommended individuals can proceed. There are 2 new influenza vaccine formulations available this year, FluMist, an intranasal vaccine and Fluzone, a pediatric formulation. Timing, indications, adverse effects, dosage and cost of the vaccines is discussed. The drugs that can be used for prophylaxis of influenza are also reviewed.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2003 Sep 29;45(1166):78-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Prevention 2002-2003

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 2, 2002;  (Issue 1138)
Influenza vaccine for the 2002-2003 season will include last year's A strains, A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1)-like and A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2)-like, and a new B strain, B/Hong-Kong/330/01-like (MMWR Morb Mortal...
Influenza vaccine for the 2002-2003 season will include last year's A strains, A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1)-like and A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2)-like, and a new B strain, B/Hong-Kong/330/01-like (MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2002; 51:503).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Sep 2;44(1138):75-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Advice for Travelers

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 15, 2002;  (Issue 1128)
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for advice about immunizations and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the CDC at...
Patients planning to travel to other countries often ask physicians for advice about immunizations and prevention of diarrhea and malaria. More detailed advice for travelers is available from the CDC at 877-FYI-TRIP (877-394-8747) or www.cdc.gov/travel.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Apr 15;44(1128):33-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Non-HIV Viral Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 4, 2002;  (Issue 1123)
The drugs of choice for non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in the table that begins on the next page. Since the last Medical Letter issue on this subject, some new drugs and some...
The drugs of choice for non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in the table that begins on the next page. Since the last Medical Letter issue on this subject, some new drugs and some new recommendations for old drugs have been added.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2002 Feb 4;44(1123):9-16 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Problems With Influenza Vaccine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 4, 2000;  (Issue 1086)
Production problems in some plants have delayed the availability of this year's influenza vaccine and may limit the total supply. These problems appear to be confined to the USA; no shortage is anticipated in...
Production problems in some plants have delayed the availability of this year's influenza vaccine and may limit the total supply. These problems appear to be confined to the USA; no shortage is anticipated in Canada
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2000 Sep 4;42(1086):79-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Non-HIV Viral Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 3, 1999;  (Issue 1067)
The drugs of choice for non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in the [article's]...
The drugs of choice for non-HIV viral infections with their dosages and cost are listed in the [article's] table.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1999 Dec 3;41(1067):113-20 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine, 1998-1999

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 11, 1998;  (Issue 1035)
A new trivalent influenza vaccine for intramuscular use is available for the 1998-1999 influenza season (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 47, RR-6, May 1, 1998). Last year's vaccine was less effective than usual...
A new trivalent influenza vaccine for intramuscular use is available for the 1998-1999 influenza season (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 47, RR-6, May 1, 1998). Last year's vaccine was less effective than usual because of the appearance of a new variant (A/Sydney/5/97) after selection of the vaccine antigens (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 47:196, 1998). Antigens in the current vaccine are A/Beijing/262/95-like (H1N1); A/Sydney/5/97-like (H3N2), and B/Harbin/07/94, antigenically equivalent to B/Beijing/184/93. Both H1N1 and the H3N2 antigens are new this year. A highly publicized live attenuated influenza vaccine given by nasal spray (FluMist) has not yet been approved by the FDA and will not be available in the USA for use in the current influenza season (RB Belshe et al, N Engl J Med, 338:1405, 1998).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1998 Sep 11;40(1035):91-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine, 1997-1998

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 12, 1997;  (Issue 1009)
A new trivalent influenza vaccine for intramuscular use is available for the 1997-1998 influenza season (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 46 RR-9, April 25, 1997). Antigens in the current vaccine are ...
A new trivalent influenza vaccine for intramuscular use is available for the 1997-1998 influenza season (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 46 RR-9, April 25, 1997). Antigens in the current vaccine are A/johannesburg/82/96, antigenically equivalent to A/Bayern/07/95 (H1N1); A/Nanchang/933/95, antigenically equivalent to A/Wuhan/359/95 (H3N2); and B/Harbin/07/94, antigenically equivalent to B/Beijing/184/93. Only the H1N1 antigen is new this year. A highly publicized nasal spray flu vaccine still has not been approved by the FDA and will not be available in the USA for use in the current influenza season.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1997 Sep 12;39(1009):85-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine, 1996-1997

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 13, 1996;  (Issue 983)
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is anticipating a delay, but not a shortage, of influenza vaccine for the 2001-2002 season. Last year manufacturing problems led to a substantial delay in...
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is anticipating a delay, but not a shortage, of influenza vaccine for the 2001-2002 season. Last year manufacturing problems led to a substantial delay in vaccine availability. This years delay is being attributed, in part, to the discontinuation of the Fluogen (King) brand of vaccine. The 2001-02 vaccine will include A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1)-like, A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2)-like, and B/Sichuan/379/99-like antigens (MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep, 50 RR-4:5, April 30, 2001).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1996 Sep 13;38(983):86 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 1, 1995;  (Issue 956)
A new trivalent influenza vaccine is available for the 1995-1996 influenza season. Influenza vaccine, made from inactivated virus grown in eggs, is recommended especially for elderly and high-risk patients,...
A new trivalent influenza vaccine is available for the 1995-1996 influenza season. Influenza vaccine, made from inactivated virus grown in eggs, is recommended especially for elderly and high-risk patients, their household contacts and health-care personnel who may come in contact with such patients (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 44, RR-3, April 21, 1995). Antigens in the current vaccine are derived from A/Texas/36/91/ (H1N1), A/Johannesburg and B/Harbin antigens are new this year.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1995 Sep 1;37(956):78 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Tacrolimus FK506 Organ Transplants

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 16, 1994;  (Issue 931)
Tacrolimus (Prograf - Fujisawa), previously called FK506 (Medical Letter, 33:94, 1991), has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for primary prevention of organ rejection in patients receiving...
Tacrolimus (Prograf - Fujisawa), previously called FK506 (Medical Letter, 33:94, 1991), has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for primary prevention of organ rejection in patients receiving liver transplants. The drug has also been used as rescue therapy for organ graft rejection unresponsive to cyclosporine (Sandimmune) and other immunosuppressive drugs.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1994 Sep 16;36(931):82-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine, 1995-1995

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 16, 1994;  (Issue 931)
Influenza vaccine for the 2002-2003 season will include last year's A strains, A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1)-like and A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2)-like, and a new B strain, B/Hong- Kong/330/01-like (MMWR Morb Mortal...
Influenza vaccine for the 2002-2003 season will include last year's A strains, A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1)-like and A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2)-like, and a new B strain, B/Hong- Kong/330/01-like (MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2002; 51:503).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1994 Sep 16;36(931):84 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Rimantadine for Prevention and Treatment of Influenza

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 26, 1993;  (Issue 910)
Rimantadine hydrochloride (Flumadine - Forest), the alpha-methyl derivative of amantadine (Symmetrel, and others), was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for prevention and treatment of...
Rimantadine hydrochloride (Flumadine - Forest), the alpha-methyl derivative of amantadine (Symmetrel, and others), was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for prevention and treatment of influenza A virus infections in adults and for prevention of influenza in children.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1993 Nov 26;35(910):109-10 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Masoprocol for Multiple Actinic Keratoses

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 15, 1993;  (Issue 907)
Masoprocol cream 10% (meso-nordihydroguiaretic acid, Actinex - Reed and Carnrick) is now available in the USA for topical treatment of actinic...
Masoprocol cream 10% (meso-nordihydroguiaretic acid, Actinex - Reed and Carnrick) is now available in the USA for topical treatment of actinic keratoses.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1993 Oct 15;35(907):97-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine, 1993-1994

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 17, 1993;  (Issue 905)
A new trivalent influenza vaccine is available for the 1993-1994 influenza season. Vaccination may be even more important than usual this year because of the appearance late in last year's flu season of a new...
A new trivalent influenza vaccine is available for the 1993-1994 influenza season. Vaccination may be even more important than usual this year because of the appearance late in last year's flu season of a new antigenic variant, which was associated with an increase in deaths (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 42:385, May 28, 1993). Influenza vaccine is recommended especially for the elderly and high-risk patients, their household contacts, and health-care personnel who may come in contact with such patients (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 42,RR-6, May 14, 1993).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1993 Sep 17;35(905):89-90 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine, 1992-1993

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 18, 1992;  (Issue 879)
A new trivalent influenza vaccine is now available for the 1992-1993 influenza season (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 41, RR-9:1, May 15, 1992). Vaccination is recommended especially for elderly and high-risk...
A new trivalent influenza vaccine is now available for the 1992-1993 influenza season (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 41, RR-9:1, May 15, 1992). Vaccination is recommended especially for elderly and high-risk patients, their household contacts, and health-care personnel who may come in contact with such patients. Antigens in the current vaccine are derived from A/Texas/36/91 (H1N1), A/Beijing/353/89 (H3N2), and B/Panama/45/90. The A/Texas/36/91 (H1N1) strain is new this year.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1992 Sep 18;34(879):90 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Viral Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 3, 1992;  (Issue 867)
Since the last review of this topic (Medical Letter, 32:73, August 10, 1990) some new antiviral agents have been approved and the indications for several others expanded. The drugs of choice for viral...
Since the last review of this topic (Medical Letter, 32:73, August 10, 1990) some new antiviral agents have been approved and the indications for several others expanded. The drugs of choice for viral infections are listed in the table on page 36.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1992 Apr 3;34(867):31-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine, 1991-1992

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 6, 1991;  (Issue 852)
A new trivalent influenza vaccine is now available for the 1991-1992 influenza season (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 40, RR-6:1, May 24, 1991). Vaccination is recommended especially for elderly and high-risk...
A new trivalent influenza vaccine is now available for the 1991-1992 influenza season (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 40, RR-6:1, May 24, 1991). Vaccination is recommended especially for elderly and high-risk patients, their household contacts, and health-care personnel who may come in contact with such patients. Antigens in the current vaccine are derived from A/Taiwan/1/86 (H1N1), A/Beijing/353/89 (H3N2), and B/Panama/45/90 are new this year.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1991 Sep 6;33(852):86 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Vaccine, 1990-1991

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 7, 1990;  (Issue 826)
A new trivalent influenza vaccine is now available for the 1990-1991 influenza season (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 39, RR7:1, May 11, 1990). Vaccination is recommended especially for elderly and high-risk...
A new trivalent influenza vaccine is now available for the 1990-1991 influenza season (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 39, RR7:1, May 11, 1990). Vaccination is recommended especially for elderly and high-risk patients, their household contacts, and health-care personnel who may come in contact with such patients. Antigens in the vaccine include A/Taiwan/1/86 (H1N1), A/Shanghai/16/89 (H3N2), and B/Yamagata/16/88 is new this year.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1990 Sep 7;32(826):86 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Viral Infections

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 10, 1990;  (Issue 824)
...
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1990 Aug 10;32(824):73-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Routine Immunization for Adult

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 1990;  (Issue 819)
Six vaccines are recommended for routine use in adults living in the USA (Guide for Adult Immunization, 2nd ed, Philadelphia:American College of Physicians, 1990). Immunization recommendations for travel...
Six vaccines are recommended for routine use in adults living in the USA (Guide for Adult Immunization, 2nd ed, Philadelphia:American College of Physicians, 1990). Immunization recommendations for travel outside the USA were published in The Medical Letter, volume 32, page 33, April 6, 1990.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1990 Jun 1;32(819):54-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Prevention, 1989-1990

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 20, 1989;  (Issue 803)
A new trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine is now available for the 1989-1990 influenza season (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 38:297, May 5, 1989: Can Med Assoc J, 141:425, Spet 1, 1989). Antigens in this...
A new trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine is now available for the 1989-1990 influenza season (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 38:297, May 5, 1989: Can Med Assoc J, 141:425, Spet 1, 1989). Antigens in this years's Vaccine are A/Taiwan/1/86 (H1N1), A/Shanghai/11/87 (H3N2), and B/Yamagata/16/88. The A/Shanghai and B/Yamagata are new strains this year. The vaccine is available in the USA as a split-virus (subvirion) or whole virus preparation from Squibb (Fluzone), as a split-virus preparation from parke-davis (Fluogen) and Wyeth-Ayerst (Influenza Virus Vaccine, Trivalent), and as a purified-surface-antigen formulations may be less likely to cause adverse reactions, especially in children; whole-virus vaccines may be slighltly more antigenic. Vaccine from previous years should not be used.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1989 Oct 20;31(803):95-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Influenza Prevention, 1988-1989

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 26, 1988;  (Issue 773)
A new trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine is now available for the 1988-1989 influenza season (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 37:357, June 17, 1988). Antigens in this year's vaccine are A/Taiwan/1/86 (H1N1),...
A new trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine is now available for the 1988-1989 influenza season (Morbid Mortal Weekly Rep, 37:357, June 17, 1988). Antigens in this year's vaccine are A/Taiwan/1/86 (H1N1), A/Sichuan/2/87 (H3N2), and B/Victoria/2/87. The A/Sichuan is a new strain that caused last year's large outbreak of the disease. The vaccine is available in the USA as a split-virus (Subvirion) or whole virus preparation from Squibb (Fluzone), and as a split-virus preparation from Parke-Davis (Fluogen) and Wyeth (Influenza Virus Vaccine, Trivalent). Split-virus vaccines may be slightly more antigenic. Vaccine from previous years should not be used.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1988 Aug 26;30(773):83-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction